Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Geoarchaeological prospection with multi-coil electromagnetic induction sensors

David Simpson UGent (2009)
abstract
In Flanders, the risk of destruction of archaeologically valuable sites is high due to the intensive building activity. The aim of archaeological prospection is to estimate the archaeological value of a terrain without complete excavation. For this purpose, earth sciences are increasingly adopted to reconstruct the paleo-environment and to increase the archaeological evidence. An important geoarchaeological prospection method is geophysical prospection, where sensors are used to map the natural soil variability and to detect anthropogenic traces without disturbing the soil. The three most applied sensor types for archaeological prospection are the magnetometer, the electrical resistivity meter and the ground penetrating radar. A fourth type, based on electromagnetic induction is less often used, despite its apparent advantages. It can measure two physical properties simultaneously, the electrical conductivity and the magnetic susceptibility. The instrument does not require soil contact and is therefore easily mounted on a motorized platform. Recently, new sensors were developed with multiple receiver coils, each having a specific spatial sensitivity. The potential of these sensors for archaeology was not evaluated until now. The goal of this doctoral research was to test the use of electromagnetic induction sensors for geoarchaeological prospection. First, a motorized sensor platform was developed to measure large areas per day in a high resolution, so that apart from the archaeological site, also its broader context can be mapped. Computer software was written to be able to process the data and to correct errors such as time drift. Second, the sensitivity of the sensor configurations was tested on an experimental site where structures of known dimensions and physical properties were buried. The results proofed that the coil configuration of the sensor has a large impact on the detection level. Third, the electrical and magnetic response of the electromagnetic induction sensors were compared with magnetometer and electrical resistivity sensors. Finally, the sensors were evaluated on different sites with Medieval or Bronze Age traces in varying environmental settings and with field verification by auger observations.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
promoter
UGent and UGent
organization
alternative title
Geoarcheologische prospectie door elektromagnetische inductiesensoren met meervoudige spoelen
year
type
dissertation (monograph)
subject
pages
XXXI, 154 pages
publisher
Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering
place of publication
Ghent, Belgium
defense location
Gent : Faculteit Bio-ingenieurswetenschappen (A0.030)
defense date
2009-12-08 17:00
ISBN
9789059893443
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
D1
additional info
dissertation in part contains copyrighted material
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
805630
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-805630
date created
2009-12-09 14:09:33
date last changed
2010-12-14 16:40:43
@phdthesis{805630,
  abstract     = {In Flanders, the risk of destruction of archaeologically valuable sites is high due to the intensive building activity. The aim of archaeological prospection is to estimate the archaeological value of a terrain without complete excavation. For this purpose, earth sciences are increasingly adopted to reconstruct the paleo-environment and to increase the archaeological evidence. An important geoarchaeological prospection method is geophysical prospection, where sensors are used to map the natural soil variability and to detect anthropogenic traces without disturbing the soil.
The three most applied sensor types for archaeological prospection are the magnetometer, the electrical resistivity meter and the ground penetrating radar. A fourth type, based on electromagnetic induction is less often used, despite its apparent advantages. It can measure two physical properties simultaneously, the electrical conductivity and the magnetic susceptibility. The instrument does not require soil contact and is therefore easily mounted on a motorized platform. Recently, new sensors were developed with multiple receiver coils, each having a specific spatial sensitivity. The potential of these sensors for archaeology was not evaluated until now.
The goal of this doctoral research was to test the use of electromagnetic induction sensors for geoarchaeological prospection. First, a motorized sensor platform was developed to measure large areas per day in a high resolution, so that apart from the archaeological site, also its broader context can be mapped.  Computer software was written to be able to process the data and to correct errors such as time drift. Second, the sensitivity of the sensor configurations was tested on an experimental site where structures of known dimensions and physical properties were buried. The results proofed that the coil configuration of the sensor has a large impact on the detection level. Third, the electrical and magnetic response of the electromagnetic induction sensors were compared with magnetometer and electrical resistivity sensors. Finally, the sensors were evaluated on different sites with Medieval or Bronze Age traces in varying environmental settings and with field verification by auger observations.},
  author       = {Simpson, David},
  isbn         = {9789059893443},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {XXXI, 154},
  publisher    = {Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {Geoarchaeological prospection with multi-coil electromagnetic induction sensors},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Simpson, David. 2009. “Geoarchaeological Prospection with Multi-coil Electromagnetic Induction Sensors”. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering.
APA
Simpson, D. (2009). Geoarchaeological prospection with multi-coil electromagnetic induction sensors. Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent, Belgium.
Vancouver
1.
Simpson D. Geoarchaeological prospection with multi-coil electromagnetic induction sensors. [Ghent, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering; 2009.
MLA
Simpson, David. “Geoarchaeological Prospection with Multi-coil Electromagnetic Induction Sensors.” 2009 : n. pag. Print.