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What a treat! I like to eat! Reward sensitivity as a determinant of eating behavior

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several studies with participants of different age groups (toddlers, might increase effectiveness of such efforts., high rewarding foods abundantly available in the present obesogenic environment, People eat, but also because eating gives them pleasure. Eating due to food deprivation is related to the energy balance and referred to as homeostatic hunger. Hedonic eating on the other hand is driven by the pleasure that is associated with eating. The unfortunate thing with the most pleasurable, not only because they are food deprived, the relevance of individual reward sensitivity is clear. Taking this individual characteristic into account when developing interventions to improve eating behavior, is that they tend to be the most calorically dense foods. However, not all individuals are equally sensitive to the rewarding aspects of food. The influence of the reward value of food might be particularly relevant for individuals with high temperamental sensitivity to reward. In this presentation, children, adolescents, eating behavior, adults) on the link between reward value of food and/or individual reward sensitivity and eating behavior will be outlined. The implications for treatment of problematic eating will be discussed., Method, We will present both cross-sectional data on the link between reward sensitivity, food intake and weight, experimental data on the reward value of food and on the effects of individual reward sensitivity on eating behavior. The differential effect of reward sensitivity on evidence-based behavior change techniques to improve eating behavior (in toddlers) will be highlighted. Most data presented will be from the ‘Reward: rewarding healthy food choices’ project., Results, High reward sensitivity is associated with increased craving and food intake, high rewarding food, and a risk factor for increased weight. Reward based strategies to improve eating behavior are found to be most effective in toddlers with high reward sensitivity., Conclusion, In the present obesogenic environment, with its omnipresence of high caloric

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Chicago
Vervoort, Leentje. 2016. “What a Treat! I Like to Eat! Reward Sensitivity as a Determinant of Eating Behavior.” In World Congress of Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies.
APA
Vervoort, Leentje. (2016). What a treat! I like to eat! Reward sensitivity as a determinant of eating behavior. World Congress of Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies. Presented at the World Congress of Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies.
Vancouver
1.
Vervoort L. What a treat! I like to eat! Reward sensitivity as a determinant of eating behavior. World Congress of Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies. 2016.
MLA
Vervoort, Leentje. “What a Treat! I Like to Eat! Reward Sensitivity as a Determinant of Eating Behavior.” World Congress of Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies. 2016. Print.
@inproceedings{8053453,
  author       = {Vervoort, Leentje},
  booktitle    = {World Congress of Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies},
  keyword      = {several studies with participants of different age groups (toddlers,might increase effectiveness of such efforts.,high rewarding foods abundantly available in the present obesogenic environment,People eat,but also because eating gives them pleasure. Eating due to food deprivation is related to the energy balance and referred to as homeostatic hunger. Hedonic eating on the other hand is driven by the pleasure that is associated with eating. The unfortunate thing with the most pleasurable,not only because they are food deprived,the relevance of individual reward sensitivity is clear. Taking this individual characteristic into account when developing interventions to improve eating behavior,is that they tend to be the most calorically dense foods. However,not all individuals are equally sensitive to the rewarding aspects of food. The influence of the reward value of food might be particularly relevant for individuals with high temperamental sensitivity to reward. In this presentation,children,adolescents,eating behavior,adults) on the link between reward value of food and/or individual reward sensitivity and eating behavior will be outlined. The implications for treatment of problematic eating will be discussed.,Method,We will present both cross-sectional data on the link between reward sensitivity,food intake and weight,experimental data on the reward value of food and on the effects of individual reward sensitivity on eating behavior. The differential effect of reward sensitivity on evidence-based behavior change techniques to improve eating behavior (in toddlers) will be highlighted. Most data presented will be from the {\textquoteleft}Reward: rewarding healthy food choices{\textquoteright} project.,Results,High reward sensitivity is associated with increased craving and food intake,high rewarding food,and a risk factor for increased weight. Reward based strategies to improve eating behavior are found to be most effective in toddlers with high reward sensitivity.,Conclusion,In the present obesogenic environment,with its omnipresence of high caloric},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Melbourne},
  title        = {What a treat! I like to eat! Reward sensitivity as a determinant of eating behavior},
  year         = {2016},
}