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Is living in a high-rise building bad for your self-rated health?

Pieter-Paul Verhaeghe UGent, Ad Coenen UGent and Bart Van de Putte UGent (2016) JOURNAL OF URBAN HEALTH-BULLETIN OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE. 93(5). p.884-898
abstract
While the construction of high-rise buildings is a popular policy strategy for accommodating population growth in cities, there is still much debate about the health consequences of living in high flats. This study examines the relationship between living in high-rise buildings and self-rated health in Belgium. We use data from the Belgian Census of 2001, merged with the National Register of Belgium (N = 6,102,820). Results from multilevel, binary logistic regression analyses show that residents living in high-rise buildings have considerable lower odds to have a good or very good self-rated health in comparison with residents in low-rise buildings (OR 0.67; 95 % CI 0.67–0.68). However, this negative relationship completely disappears after adjusting for socioeconomic and demographic variables (OR 1.04; 95 % CI 1.03–1.05), which suggests that residents’ worse self-rated health in high-rise buildings can be explained by the strong demographic and socioeconomic segregation between high- and low-rise buildings in Belgium. In addition, there is a weak, but robust curvilinear relationship between floor level and self-rated health within high-rise buildings. Self-rated health increases until the sixth floor (OR 1.19; 95 % CI 1.15–1.24) and remains stable from the seventh floor and upwards. These findings refute one of the central ideas in architectural sciences that living in high buildings is bad for one’s health.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
DOSE-RESPONSE METAANALYSIS, ROAD-TRAFFIC NOISE, PREDICTION, NEIGHBORHOOD, Belgium, PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY, FLATS, MORTALITY, MENTAL-HEALTH, FAMILIES, FLOOR, High-rise building, Floor level, Housing, Self-rated health, Segregation
journal title
JOURNAL OF URBAN HEALTH-BULLETIN OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE
volume
93
issue
5
pages
884 - 898
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000385026200010
JCR category
MEDICINE, GENERAL & INTERNAL
JCR impact factor
1.959 (2016)
JCR rank
48/154 (2016)
JCR quartile
2 (2016)
ISSN
1099-3460
DOI
10.1007/s11524-016-0066-5
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
8049424
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8049424
alternative location
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11524-016-0066-5
date created
2016-08-16 13:33:41
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:48:22
@article{8049424,
  abstract     = {While the construction of high-rise buildings is a popular policy strategy for accommodating population growth in cities, there is still much debate about the health consequences of living in high flats. This study examines the relationship between living in high-rise buildings and self-rated health in Belgium. We use data from the Belgian Census of 2001, merged with the National Register of Belgium (N\,=\,6,102,820). Results from multilevel, binary logistic regression analyses show that residents living in high-rise buildings have considerable lower odds to have a good or very good self-rated health in comparison with residents in low-rise buildings (OR 0.67; 95 \% CI 0.67--0.68). However, this negative relationship completely disappears after adjusting for socioeconomic and demographic variables (OR 1.04; 95 \% CI 1.03--1.05), which suggests that residents{\textquoteright} worse self-rated health in high-rise buildings can be explained by the strong demographic and socioeconomic segregation between high- and low-rise buildings in Belgium. In addition, there is a weak, but robust curvilinear relationship between floor level and self-rated health within high-rise buildings. Self-rated health increases until the sixth floor (OR 1.19; 95 \% CI 1.15--1.24) and remains stable from the seventh floor and upwards. These findings refute one of the central ideas in architectural sciences that living in high buildings is bad for one{\textquoteright}s health.},
  author       = {Verhaeghe, Pieter-Paul and Coenen, Ad and Van de Putte, Bart},
  issn         = {1099-3460},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF URBAN HEALTH-BULLETIN OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE},
  keyword      = {DOSE-RESPONSE METAANALYSIS,ROAD-TRAFFIC NOISE,PREDICTION,NEIGHBORHOOD,Belgium,PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY,FLATS,MORTALITY,MENTAL-HEALTH,FAMILIES,FLOOR,High-rise building,Floor level,Housing,Self-rated health,Segregation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {884--898},
  title        = {Is living in a high-rise building bad for your self-rated health?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11524-016-0066-5},
  volume       = {93},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
Verhaeghe, Pieter-Paul, Ad Coenen, and Bart Van de Putte. 2016. “Is Living in a High-rise Building Bad for Your Self-rated Health?” Journal of Urban Health-bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine 93 (5): 884–898.
APA
Verhaeghe, P.-P., Coenen, A., & Van de Putte, B. (2016). Is living in a high-rise building bad for your self-rated health? JOURNAL OF URBAN HEALTH-BULLETIN OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE, 93(5), 884–898.
Vancouver
1.
Verhaeghe P-P, Coenen A, Van de Putte B. Is living in a high-rise building bad for your self-rated health? JOURNAL OF URBAN HEALTH-BULLETIN OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE. 2016;93(5):884–98.
MLA
Verhaeghe, Pieter-Paul, Ad Coenen, and Bart Van de Putte. “Is Living in a High-rise Building Bad for Your Self-rated Health?” JOURNAL OF URBAN HEALTH-BULLETIN OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE 93.5 (2016): 884–898. Print.