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Long-term effects of colostrum intake in piglet mortality and performance

Ilse Declerck (UGent) , Jeroen Dewulf (UGent) , Steven Sarrazin (UGent) and Dominiek Maes (UGent)
(2016) JOURNAL OF ANIMAL SCIENCE. 94(4). p.1633-1643
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Abstract
The present study investigated the long-term effects of colostrum intake on performance and mortality in pigs. A total of 1,455 live-born piglets in 10 commercial herds were followed from birth until 22 wk of age. Pigs were individually weighed at birth, at weaning, at onset (intermediate weight), and during the fattening period (finishing weight). Colostrum intake was calculated by the mechanistic model developed by Theil et al. (see text for citation). One linear mixed model was fitted to model the possible associations between colostrum intake and weight at the weaning, intermediate, and finishing periods. In addition to colostrum intake as the main predictor of interest, other predictor variables were also tested, namely birth weight, birth order, sex, breed, and the interval between birth and first suckling (t(FS)). Colostrum intake and birth weight were positively associated with weaning (P < 0.001), intermediate (P < 0.001), and finishing (P < 0.001) weights. Furthermore, higher colostrum intake is more beneficial to weaning (P < 0.001), intermediate (P < 0.001), and finishing (P = 0.02) weights in piglets with low versus high birth weights. Birth order was positively associated with weight at each measurement time (P = 0.01). Sex affected only finishing weight (P < 0.001). Some breeds differed in piglets' weight at onset or during the fattening period. The association between tFS and weaning weight differed by breed. Three generalized linear mixed models were performed to model the probability of dying during the suckling, the nursery, or the fattening period. Colostrum intake, birth weight, birth order, sex, breed, and tFS were tested. Preweaning mortality was negatively associated with colostrum intake (P < 0.001) and birth weight (P = 0.004) and positively associated with tFS (P < 0.001). Mortality during the nursery period was negatively associated with colostrum intake (P < 0.001) and birth weight (P = 0.002). The negative association between colostrum intake and mortality during the suckling (P < 0.001) and the nursery (P = 0.008) periods was more pronounced in small versus heavy piglets. Mortality during fattening was associated with weaning (P = 0.04) and intermediate (P = 0.006) weight. In conclusion, colostrum intake significantly influences piglets' short-term and long-term performance and mortality. As colostrum yield is reported to be independent of litter size, sufficient colostrum intake per piglet is crucial, especially in hyperprolific sows.
Keywords
long term, mortality, colostrum, NEWBORN PIGLET, GROWTH-PERFORMANCE, performance, piglet, LOOSE-HOUSED SOWS, DAILY WEIGHT-GAIN, BIRTH-WEIGHT, LITTER SIZE, NEONATAL SURVIVAL, SUBSEQUENT GROWTH, PREDICT COLOSTRUM, NURSERY PHASE

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Chicago
Declerck, Ilse, Jeroen Dewulf, Steven Sarrazin, and Dominiek Maes. 2016. “Long-term Effects of Colostrum Intake in Piglet Mortality and Performance.” Journal of Animal Science 94 (4): 1633–1643.
APA
Declerck, I., Dewulf, J., Sarrazin, S., & Maes, D. (2016). Long-term effects of colostrum intake in piglet mortality and performance. JOURNAL OF ANIMAL SCIENCE, 94(4), 1633–1643.
Vancouver
1.
Declerck I, Dewulf J, Sarrazin S, Maes D. Long-term effects of colostrum intake in piglet mortality and performance. JOURNAL OF ANIMAL SCIENCE. 2016;94(4):1633–43.
MLA
Declerck, Ilse, Jeroen Dewulf, Steven Sarrazin, et al. “Long-term Effects of Colostrum Intake in Piglet Mortality and Performance.” JOURNAL OF ANIMAL SCIENCE 94.4 (2016): 1633–1643. Print.
@article{8048015,
  abstract     = {The present study investigated the long-term effects of colostrum intake on performance and mortality in pigs. A total of 1,455 live-born piglets in 10 commercial herds were followed from birth until 22 wk of age. Pigs were individually weighed at birth, at weaning, at onset (intermediate weight), and during the fattening period (finishing weight). Colostrum intake was calculated by the mechanistic model developed by Theil et al. (see text for citation). One linear mixed model was fitted to model the possible associations between colostrum intake and weight at the weaning, intermediate, and finishing periods. In addition to colostrum intake as the main predictor of interest, other predictor variables were also tested, namely birth weight, birth order, sex, breed, and the interval between birth and first suckling (t(FS)). Colostrum intake and birth weight were positively associated with weaning (P {\textlangle} 0.001), intermediate (P {\textlangle} 0.001), and finishing (P {\textlangle} 0.001) weights. Furthermore, higher colostrum intake is more beneficial to weaning (P {\textlangle} 0.001), intermediate (P {\textlangle} 0.001), and finishing (P = 0.02) weights in piglets with low versus high birth weights. Birth order was positively associated with weight at each measurement time (P = 0.01). Sex affected only finishing weight (P {\textlangle} 0.001). Some breeds differed in piglets' weight at onset or during the fattening period. The association between tFS and weaning weight differed by breed. Three generalized linear mixed models were performed to model the probability of dying during the suckling, the nursery, or the fattening period. Colostrum intake, birth weight, birth order, sex, breed, and tFS were tested. Preweaning mortality was negatively associated with colostrum intake (P {\textlangle} 0.001) and birth weight (P = 0.004) and positively associated with tFS (P {\textlangle} 0.001). Mortality during the nursery period was negatively associated with colostrum intake (P {\textlangle} 0.001) and birth weight (P = 0.002). The negative association between colostrum intake and mortality during the suckling (P {\textlangle} 0.001) and the nursery (P = 0.008) periods was more pronounced in small versus heavy piglets. Mortality during fattening was associated with weaning (P = 0.04) and intermediate (P = 0.006) weight. In conclusion, colostrum intake significantly influences piglets' short-term and long-term performance and mortality. As colostrum yield is reported to be independent of litter size, sufficient colostrum intake per piglet is crucial, especially in hyperprolific sows.},
  author       = {Declerck, Ilse and Dewulf, Jeroen and Sarrazin, Steven and Maes, Dominiek},
  issn         = {0021-8812},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF ANIMAL SCIENCE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {1633--1643},
  title        = {Long-term effects of colostrum intake in piglet mortality and performance},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2527/jas2015-9564},
  volume       = {94},
  year         = {2016},
}

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