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Local host response following an intramammary challenge with Staphylococcus fleurettii and different strains of Staphylococcus chromogenes in dairy heifers

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Abstract
Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are a common cause of subclinical mastitis in dairy cattle. The CNS inhabit various ecological habitats, ranging between the environment and the host. In order to obtain a better insight into the host response, an experimental infection was carried out in eight healthy heifers in mid-lactation with three different CNS strains: a Staphylococcus fleurettii strain originating from sawdust bedding, an intramammary Staphylococcus chromogenes strain originating from a persistent intramammary infection (S. chromogenes IM) and a S. chromogenes strain isolated from a heifer's teat apex (S. chromogenes TA). Each heifer was inoculated in the mammary gland with 1.0 x 10(6) colony forming units of each bacterial strain (one strain per udder quarter), whereas the remaining quarter was infused with phosphate-buffered saline. Overall, the CNS evoked a mild local host response. The somatic cell count increased in all S. fleurettii-inoculated quarters, although the strain was eliminated within 12 h. The two S. chromogenes strains were shed in larger numbers for a longer period. Bacterial and somatic cell counts, as well as neutrophil responses, were higher after inoculation with S. chromogenes IM than with S. chromogenes TA. In conclusion, these results suggest that S. chromogenes might be better adapted to the mammary gland than S. fleurettii. Furthermore, not all S. chromogenes strains induce the same local host response.
Keywords
SOMATIC-CELL COUNT, COAGULASE-NEGATIVE STAPHYLOCOCCI, MAJOR MASTITIS PATHOGENS, INNATE IMMUNE-RESPONSE, TEAT APEX COLONIZATION, ESCHERICHIA-COLI, BOVINE MASTITIS, TECHNICAL-NOTE, MILK NEUTROPHILS, RISK-FACTORS

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MLA
Piccart, Kristine et al. “Local Host Response Following an Intramammary Challenge with Staphylococcus Fleurettii and Different Strains of Staphylococcus Chromogenes in Dairy Heifers.” VETERINARY RESEARCH 47 (2016): n. pag. Print.
APA
Piccart, K., Verbeke, J., De Visscher, A., Piepers, S., Haesebrouck, F., & De Vliegher, S. (2016). Local host response following an intramammary challenge with Staphylococcus fleurettii and different strains of Staphylococcus chromogenes in dairy heifers. VETERINARY RESEARCH, 47.
Chicago author-date
Piccart, Kristine, Joren Verbeke, Anneleen De Visscher, Sofie Piepers, Freddy Haesebrouck, and Sarne De Vliegher. 2016. “Local Host Response Following an Intramammary Challenge with Staphylococcus Fleurettii and Different Strains of Staphylococcus Chromogenes in Dairy Heifers.” Veterinary Research 47.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Piccart, Kristine, Joren Verbeke, Anneleen De Visscher, Sofie Piepers, Freddy Haesebrouck, and Sarne De Vliegher. 2016. “Local Host Response Following an Intramammary Challenge with Staphylococcus Fleurettii and Different Strains of Staphylococcus Chromogenes in Dairy Heifers.” Veterinary Research 47.
Vancouver
1.
Piccart K, Verbeke J, De Visscher A, Piepers S, Haesebrouck F, De Vliegher S. Local host response following an intramammary challenge with Staphylococcus fleurettii and different strains of Staphylococcus chromogenes in dairy heifers. VETERINARY RESEARCH. 2016;47.
IEEE
[1]
K. Piccart, J. Verbeke, A. De Visscher, S. Piepers, F. Haesebrouck, and S. De Vliegher, “Local host response following an intramammary challenge with Staphylococcus fleurettii and different strains of Staphylococcus chromogenes in dairy heifers,” VETERINARY RESEARCH, vol. 47, 2016.
@article{8047823,
  abstract     = {Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are a common cause of subclinical mastitis in dairy cattle. The CNS inhabit various ecological habitats, ranging between the environment and the host. In order to obtain a better insight into the host response, an experimental infection was carried out in eight healthy heifers in mid-lactation with three different CNS strains: a Staphylococcus fleurettii strain originating from sawdust bedding, an intramammary Staphylococcus chromogenes strain originating from a persistent intramammary infection (S. chromogenes IM) and a S. chromogenes strain isolated from a heifer's teat apex (S. chromogenes TA). Each heifer was inoculated in the mammary gland with 1.0 x 10(6) colony forming units of each bacterial strain (one strain per udder quarter), whereas the remaining quarter was infused with phosphate-buffered saline. Overall, the CNS evoked a mild local host response. The somatic cell count increased in all S. fleurettii-inoculated quarters, although the strain was eliminated within 12 h. The two S. chromogenes strains were shed in larger numbers for a longer period. Bacterial and somatic cell counts, as well as neutrophil responses, were higher after inoculation with S. chromogenes IM than with S. chromogenes TA. In conclusion, these results suggest that S. chromogenes might be better adapted to the mammary gland than S. fleurettii. Furthermore, not all S. chromogenes strains induce the same local host response.},
  articleno    = {56},
  author       = {Piccart, Kristine and Verbeke, Joren and De Visscher, Anneleen and Piepers, Sofie and Haesebrouck, Freddy and De Vliegher, Sarne},
  issn         = {0928-4249},
  journal      = {VETERINARY RESEARCH},
  keywords     = {SOMATIC-CELL COUNT,COAGULASE-NEGATIVE STAPHYLOCOCCI,MAJOR MASTITIS PATHOGENS,INNATE IMMUNE-RESPONSE,TEAT APEX COLONIZATION,ESCHERICHIA-COLI,BOVINE MASTITIS,TECHNICAL-NOTE,MILK NEUTROPHILS,RISK-FACTORS},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {11},
  title        = {Local host response following an intramammary challenge with Staphylococcus fleurettii and different strains of Staphylococcus chromogenes in dairy heifers},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13567-016-0338-9},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2016},
}

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