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Pigs and avian influenza viruses: susceptibility and significance for interspecies transmission

Annebel De Vleeschauwer UGent (2009)
abstract
Influenza A viruses infect humans and animals as diverse as pigs, horses, seals, ferrets and a variety of wild and domestic bird species. For decades, pigs were believed to be uniquely susceptible to influenza viruses of both human and avian origin, and were hypothesized to act as mixing vessels in which avian and human viruses could reassort, generating novel influenza virus subtypes with pandemic potential. Although this theory has been suggested to explain the emergence of the 1957 and 1968 human pandemic influenza viruses, it has never been proven and recent research findings pose serious questions on its credibility.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
promoter
UGent
organization
year
type
dissertation (monograph)
subject
keyword
Avian Influenza, heterosubtypic immunity, susceptibility, Pigs
pages
173 pages
publisher
Ghent University. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine
place of publication
Merelbeke, Belgium
defense location
Merelbeke : Faculteit Diergeneeskunde (auditorium D)
defense date
2009-12-16 16:00
ISBN
9789058641953
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
D1
additional info
dissertation in parts contains copyrighted material
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
803239
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-803239
date created
2009-12-08 14:20:52
date last changed
2010-03-05 12:02:36
@phdthesis{803239,
  abstract     = {Influenza A viruses infect humans and animals as diverse as pigs, horses, seals, ferrets and a variety of wild and domestic bird species. For decades, pigs were believed to be uniquely susceptible to influenza viruses of both human and avian origin, and were hypothesized to act as mixing vessels in which avian and human viruses could reassort, generating novel influenza virus subtypes with pandemic potential. Although this theory has been suggested to explain the emergence of the 1957 and 1968 human pandemic influenza viruses, it has never been proven and recent research findings pose serious questions on its credibility.},
  author       = {De Vleeschauwer, Annebel},
  isbn         = {9789058641953},
  keyword      = {Avian Influenza,heterosubtypic immunity,susceptibility,Pigs},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {173},
  publisher    = {Ghent University. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {Pigs and avian influenza viruses: susceptibility and significance for interspecies transmission},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
De Vleeschauwer, Annebel. 2009. “Pigs and Avian Influenza Viruses: Susceptibility and Significance for Interspecies Transmission”. Merelbeke, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine.
APA
De Vleeschauwer, A. (2009). Pigs and avian influenza viruses: susceptibility and significance for interspecies transmission. Ghent University. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Merelbeke, Belgium.
Vancouver
1.
De Vleeschauwer A. Pigs and avian influenza viruses: susceptibility and significance for interspecies transmission. [Merelbeke, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine; 2009.
MLA
De Vleeschauwer, Annebel. “Pigs and Avian Influenza Viruses: Susceptibility and Significance for Interspecies Transmission.” 2009 : n. pag. Print.