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(Re)animating the image: staging media in Romeo Castellucci's M.#10 Marseille

Jeroen Coppens (UGent)
(2016) DOCUMENTA. 34(1). p.10-27
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Abstract
Contemporary theater practices show a clear shift toward the visual, leaving behind the authorial voice of the text in dramatic theater. Bonnie Marranca already noticed how avant-garde artists use text merely as pretext (xi) in a theater of high visuality (xii) and also Hans-Thies Lehmann affirms the contemporary preoccupation with visual dramaturgy (93). In the wake of this evolution, theater studies has focused more and more on theater as a visual event, proposing theater as an image-producing medium able to reflect on the politics of image-making (Röttger and Jackob) and capable of critically engaging with historical ways of seeing (Bleeker). Interestingly, these accounts foreground theater as a self-reflective medium that deconstructs the operations of making and seeing images. The article continues this line of thought, analyzing how different media (painting, sculpture, photography and cinema) are staged in the visual dramaturgy of Romeo Castellucci’s M.#10 Marseille. We argue that theater’s critical potential toward the visual is anchored in the clash of the spatio-temporal logics of these respective media. Nevertheless, the account of theater as a self-reflective vision machine also falls short, as it fails to acknowledge the magical aspects of the (re)animation of the image on the theater stage. As visual dramaturgies provide a stage to bring the image to life, they go beyond a self-critical account of theater and experiment with an animistic attitude toward the image as a living organism (Mitchell).
Keywords
visual studies, W.J.T. Mitchell, the image as living organism, intermediality, visual dramaturgy

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MLA
Coppens, Jeroen. “(Re)animating the Image: Staging Media in Romeo Castellucci’s M.#10 Marseille.” DOCUMENTA 34.1 (2016): 10–27. Print.
APA
Coppens, Jeroen. (2016). (Re)animating the image: staging media in Romeo Castellucci’s M.#10 Marseille. DOCUMENTA, 34(1), 10–27.
Chicago author-date
Coppens, Jeroen. 2016. “(Re)animating the Image: Staging Media in Romeo Castellucci’s M.#10 Marseille.” Documenta 34 (1): 10–27.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Coppens, Jeroen. 2016. “(Re)animating the Image: Staging Media in Romeo Castellucci’s M.#10 Marseille.” Documenta 34 (1): 10–27.
Vancouver
1.
Coppens J. (Re)animating the image: staging media in Romeo Castellucci’s M.#10 Marseille. DOCUMENTA. 2016;34(1):10–27.
IEEE
[1]
J. Coppens, “(Re)animating the image: staging media in Romeo Castellucci’s M.#10 Marseille,” DOCUMENTA, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 10–27, 2016.
@article{8026832,
  abstract     = {{Contemporary theater practices show a clear shift toward the visual, leaving behind the authorial voice of the text in dramatic theater. Bonnie Marranca already noticed how avant-garde artists use text merely as pretext (xi) in a theater of high visuality (xii) and also Hans-Thies Lehmann affirms the contemporary preoccupation with visual dramaturgy (93). In the wake of this evolution, theater studies has focused more and more on theater as a visual event, proposing theater as an image-producing medium able to reflect on the politics of image-making (Röttger and Jackob) and capable of critically engaging with historical ways of seeing (Bleeker). Interestingly, these accounts foreground theater as a self-reflective medium that deconstructs the operations of making and seeing images. 
The article continues this line of thought, analyzing how different media (painting, sculpture, photography and cinema) are staged in the visual dramaturgy of Romeo Castellucci’s M.#10 Marseille. We argue that theater’s critical potential toward the visual is anchored in the clash of the spatio-temporal logics of these respective media. Nevertheless, the account of theater as a self-reflective vision machine also falls short, as it fails to acknowledge the magical aspects of the (re)animation of the image on the theater stage. As visual dramaturgies provide a stage to bring the image to life, they go beyond a self-critical account of theater and experiment with an animistic attitude toward the image as a living organism (Mitchell).}},
  author       = {{Coppens, Jeroen}},
  issn         = {{0771-8640}},
  journal      = {{DOCUMENTA}},
  keywords     = {{visual studies,W.J.T. Mitchell,the image as living organism,intermediality,visual dramaturgy}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{1}},
  pages        = {{10--27}},
  title        = {{(Re)animating the image: staging media in Romeo Castellucci's M.#10 Marseille}},
  volume       = {{34}},
  year         = {{2016}},
}