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Acromiohumeral distance during neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the lower trapezius and serratus anterior muscles in healthy participants

Alya H Bdaiwi, Tanya Anne Mackenzie, Lee Herrington, Ian Horsley and Ann Cools UGent (2015) JOURNAL OF ATHLETIC TRAINING. 50(7). p.713-718
abstract
Context: Compromise to the acromiohumeral distance has been reported in participants with subacromial impingement syndrome compared with healthy participants. In clinical practice, patients with subacromial shoulder impingement are given strengthening programs targeting the lower trapezius (LT) and serratus anterior (SA) muscles to increase scapular posterior tilt and upward rotation. We are the first to use neuromuscular electrical stimulation to stimulate these muscle groups and evaluate how the muscle contraction affects the acromiohumeral distance. Objective: To investigate if electrical muscle stimulation of the LT and SA muscles, both separately and simultaneously, increases the acromiohumeral distance and to identify which muscle-group contraction or combination most influences the acromiohumeral distance. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: Human performance laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty participants (10 men and 10 women, age - 26.9 +/- 8.0 years, body mass index - 23.8) were screened. Intervention(s): Neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the LT and SA. Main Outcome Measure(s): Ultrasound measurement of the acromiohumeral distance. Results: Acromiohumeral distance increased during contraction via neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the LT muscle (t(19) = -3.89, P = .004), SA muscle (t(19) = -7.67, P = .001), and combined LT and SA muscles (t(19) = -5.09, P = .001). We observed no differences in the increased acromiohumeral distance among the 3 procedures (F-2,F-57 = 3.109, P = .08). Conclusions: Our results supported the hypothesis that the muscle force couple around the scapula is important in rehabilitation and scapular control and influences acromiohumeral distance.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
subacromial impingement syndrome, real-time ultrasound, rehabilitation, SHOULDER IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME, SCAPULAR KINEMATICS, RECRUITMENT PATTERNS, SUBACROMIAL SPACE, UPPER EXTREMITY, SYMPTOMS, INDIVIDUALS, REHABILITATION, ORIENTATION, PROTRACTION
journal title
JOURNAL OF ATHLETIC TRAINING
J. Athl. Train.
volume
50
issue
7
pages
713 - 718
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000365183300005
JCR category
SPORT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
2.224 (2015)
JCR rank
21/82 (2015)
JCR quartile
2 (2015)
ISSN
1062-6050
DOI
10.4085/1062-6050-50.4.03
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
8025781
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8025781
date created
2016-07-04 16:00:34
date last changed
2017-03-17 14:57:17
@article{8025781,
  abstract     = {Context: Compromise to the acromiohumeral distance has been reported in participants with subacromial impingement syndrome compared with healthy participants. In clinical practice, patients with subacromial shoulder impingement are given strengthening programs targeting the lower trapezius (LT) and serratus anterior (SA) muscles to increase scapular posterior tilt and upward rotation. We are the first to use neuromuscular electrical stimulation to stimulate these muscle groups and evaluate how the muscle contraction affects the acromiohumeral distance. 
Objective: To investigate if electrical muscle stimulation of the LT and SA muscles, both separately and simultaneously, increases the acromiohumeral distance and to identify which muscle-group contraction or combination most influences the acromiohumeral distance. 
Design: Controlled laboratory study. 
Setting: Human performance laboratory. 
Patients or Other Participants: Twenty participants (10 men and 10 women, age - 26.9 +/- 8.0 years, body mass index - 23.8) were screened. 
Intervention(s): Neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the LT and SA. 
Main Outcome Measure(s): Ultrasound measurement of the acromiohumeral distance. 
Results: Acromiohumeral distance increased during contraction via neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the LT muscle (t(19) = -3.89, P = .004), SA muscle (t(19) = -7.67, P = .001), and combined LT and SA muscles (t(19) = -5.09, P = .001). We observed no differences in the increased acromiohumeral distance among the 3 procedures (F-2,F-57 = 3.109, P = .08). 
Conclusions: Our results supported the hypothesis that the muscle force couple around the scapula is important in rehabilitation and scapular control and influences acromiohumeral distance.},
  author       = {Bdaiwi, Alya H and Mackenzie, Tanya Anne and Herrington, Lee and Horsley, Ian and Cools, Ann},
  issn         = {1062-6050},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF ATHLETIC TRAINING},
  keyword      = {subacromial impingement syndrome,real-time ultrasound,rehabilitation,SHOULDER IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME,SCAPULAR KINEMATICS,RECRUITMENT PATTERNS,SUBACROMIAL SPACE,UPPER EXTREMITY,SYMPTOMS,INDIVIDUALS,REHABILITATION,ORIENTATION,PROTRACTION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {713--718},
  title        = {Acromiohumeral distance during neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the lower trapezius and serratus anterior muscles in healthy participants},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4085/1062-6050-50.4.03},
  volume       = {50},
  year         = {2015},
}

Chicago
Bdaiwi, Alya H, Tanya Anne Mackenzie, Lee Herrington, Ian Horsley, and Ann Cools. 2015. “Acromiohumeral Distance During Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation of the Lower Trapezius and Serratus Anterior Muscles in Healthy Participants.” Journal of Athletic Training 50 (7): 713–718.
APA
Bdaiwi, Alya H, Mackenzie, T. A., Herrington, L., Horsley, I., & Cools, A. (2015). Acromiohumeral distance during neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the lower trapezius and serratus anterior muscles in healthy participants. JOURNAL OF ATHLETIC TRAINING, 50(7), 713–718.
Vancouver
1.
Bdaiwi AH, Mackenzie TA, Herrington L, Horsley I, Cools A. Acromiohumeral distance during neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the lower trapezius and serratus anterior muscles in healthy participants. JOURNAL OF ATHLETIC TRAINING. 2015;50(7):713–8.
MLA
Bdaiwi, Alya H, Tanya Anne Mackenzie, Lee Herrington, et al. “Acromiohumeral Distance During Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation of the Lower Trapezius and Serratus Anterior Muscles in Healthy Participants.” JOURNAL OF ATHLETIC TRAINING 50.7 (2015): 713–718. Print.