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Gastric Helicobacters in domestic animals and nonhuman primates and their significance for human health

Freddy Haesebrouck UGent, Frank Pasmans UGent, Bram Flahou UGent, Koen Chiers UGent, Margo Baele UGent, Tom Meyns UGent, Annemie Decostere UGent and Richard Ducatelle UGent (2009) CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY REVIEWS. 22(2). p.202-223
abstract
Helicobacters other than Helicobacter pylori have been associated with gastritis, gastric ulcers, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in humans. These very fastidious microorganisms with a typical large spiral-shaped morphology were provisionally designated "H. heilmannii," but in fact they comprise at least five different Helicobacter species, all of which are known to colonize the gastric mucosa of animals. H. suis, which has been isolated from the stomachs of pigs, is the most prevalent gastric non-H. pylori Helicobacter species in humans. Other gastric non-H. pylori helicobacters colonizing the human stomach are H. felis, H. salomonis, H. bizzozeronii, and the still-uncultivable "Candidatus Helicobacter heilmannii." These microorganisms are often detected in the stomachs of dogs and cats. " Candidatus Helicobacter bovis" is highly prevalent in the abomasums of cattle but has only occasionally been detected in the stomachs of humans. There are clear indications that gastric non-H. pylori Helicobacter infections in humans originate from animals, and it is likely that transmission to humans occurs through direct contact. Little is known about the virulence factors of these microorganisms. The recent successes with in vitro isolation of non-H. pylori helicobacters from domestic animals open new perspectives for studying these microorganisms and their interactions with the host.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
SPIRAL-SHAPED BACTERIA, CAMPYLOBACTER-PYLORI, UREASE-NEGATIVE MUTANT, SP-NOV., HEILMANNII-LIKE ORGANISMS, MONKEYS MACACA-FASCICULARIS, GAMMA-GLUTAMYL-TRANSPEPTIDASE, GASTROSPIRILLUM-HOMINIS, PYLORI VACUOLATING CYTOTOXIN, MUSTELA-PUTORIUS-FURO
journal title
CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY REVIEWS
Clin. Microbiol. Rev.
volume
22
issue
2
pages
23 pages
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000265161100003
JCR category
MICROBIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
14.691 (2009)
JCR rank
2/94 (2009)
JCR quartile
1 (2009)
ISSN
0893-8512
DOI
10.1128/CMR.00041-08
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
799436
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-799436
date created
2009-12-04 10:38:04
date last changed
2010-02-02 10:26:16
@article{799436,
  abstract     = {Helicobacters other than Helicobacter pylori have been associated with gastritis, gastric ulcers, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in humans. These very fastidious microorganisms with a typical large spiral-shaped morphology were provisionally designated {\textacutedbl}H. heilmannii,{\textacutedbl} but in fact they comprise at least five different Helicobacter species, all of which are known to colonize the gastric mucosa of animals. H. suis, which has been isolated from the stomachs of pigs, is the most prevalent gastric non-H. pylori Helicobacter species in humans. Other gastric non-H. pylori helicobacters colonizing the human stomach are H. felis, H. salomonis, H. bizzozeronii, and the still-uncultivable {\textacutedbl}Candidatus Helicobacter heilmannii.{\textacutedbl} These microorganisms are often detected in the stomachs of dogs and cats. {\textacutedbl} Candidatus Helicobacter bovis{\textacutedbl} is highly prevalent in the abomasums of cattle but has only occasionally been detected in the stomachs of humans. There are clear indications that gastric non-H. pylori Helicobacter infections in humans originate from animals, and it is likely that transmission to humans occurs through direct contact. Little is known about the virulence factors of these microorganisms. The recent successes with in vitro isolation of non-H. pylori helicobacters from domestic animals open new perspectives for studying these microorganisms and their interactions with the host.},
  author       = {Haesebrouck, Freddy and Pasmans, Frank and Flahou, Bram and Chiers, Koen and Baele, Margo and Meyns, Tom and Decostere, Annemie and Ducatelle, Richard},
  issn         = {0893-8512},
  journal      = {CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY REVIEWS},
  keyword      = {SPIRAL-SHAPED BACTERIA,CAMPYLOBACTER-PYLORI,UREASE-NEGATIVE MUTANT,SP-NOV.,HEILMANNII-LIKE ORGANISMS,MONKEYS MACACA-FASCICULARIS,GAMMA-GLUTAMYL-TRANSPEPTIDASE,GASTROSPIRILLUM-HOMINIS,PYLORI VACUOLATING CYTOTOXIN,MUSTELA-PUTORIUS-FURO},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {202--223},
  title        = {Gastric Helicobacters in domestic animals and nonhuman primates and their significance for human health},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/CMR.00041-08},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Haesebrouck, Freddy, Frank Pasmans, Bram Flahou, Koen Chiers, Margo Baele, Tom Meyns, Annemie Decostere, and Richard Ducatelle. 2009. “Gastric Helicobacters in Domestic Animals and Nonhuman Primates and Their Significance for Human Health.” Clinical Microbiology Reviews 22 (2): 202–223.
APA
Haesebrouck, F., Pasmans, F., Flahou, B., Chiers, K., Baele, M., Meyns, T., Decostere, A., et al. (2009). Gastric Helicobacters in domestic animals and nonhuman primates and their significance for human health. CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY REVIEWS, 22(2), 202–223.
Vancouver
1.
Haesebrouck F, Pasmans F, Flahou B, Chiers K, Baele M, Meyns T, et al. Gastric Helicobacters in domestic animals and nonhuman primates and their significance for human health. CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY REVIEWS. 2009;22(2):202–23.
MLA
Haesebrouck, Freddy, Frank Pasmans, Bram Flahou, et al. “Gastric Helicobacters in Domestic Animals and Nonhuman Primates and Their Significance for Human Health.” CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY REVIEWS 22.2 (2009): 202–223. Print.