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The Salmonella enteritidis lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis gene rfbH is required for survival in egg albumen

Inne Gantois (UGent) , Richard Ducatelle (UGent) , Frank Pasmans (UGent) , Freddy Haesebrouck (UGent) and Filip Van Immerseel (UGent)
(2009) ZOONOSES AND PUBLIC HEALTH. 56(3). p.145-149
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Abstract
Salmonella Enteritidis is still a major cause of human food borne infections and can be associated with the consumption of meat and chicken eggs. It is the world's most common cause of salmonellosis in part because it has the ability to colonize the oviduct and contaminate eggs. It was shown that when stored at room temperature, S. Enteritidis bacteria can multiply extensively in contaminated eggs. Using the in vivo expression technology, it was shown that the rfbH gene, involved in lipopolysaccharide O-antigen synthesis, is transcriptionally induced during growth in whole eggs at room temperature. A S. Enteritidis Delta rfbH strain was unable to multiply in eggs at room temperature and did not survive in egg white at 42 degrees C. The attenuation was most likely caused by an increased susceptibility of the Delta rfbH mutant to yet undefined antibacterial components of the egg albumen.
Keywords
ESCHERICHIA-COLI, EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED HENS, GROWTH, MEMBRANE, BACTERIA, LYSOZYME, egg white survival, LPS, egg contamination, Salmonella Enteritidis, CONTAMINATED EGGS, OVOTRANSFERRIN, INACTIVATION, TYPHIMURIUM

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Chicago
Gantois, Inne, Richard Ducatelle, Frank Pasmans, Freddy Haesebrouck, and Filip Van Immerseel. 2009. “The Salmonella Enteritidis Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Gene rfbH Is Required for Survival in Egg Albumen.” Zoonoses and Public Health 56 (3): 145–149.
APA
Gantois, I., Ducatelle, R., Pasmans, F., Haesebrouck, F., & Van Immerseel, F. (2009). The Salmonella enteritidis lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis gene rfbH is required for survival in egg albumen. ZOONOSES AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 56(3), 145–149.
Vancouver
1.
Gantois I, Ducatelle R, Pasmans F, Haesebrouck F, Van Immerseel F. The Salmonella enteritidis lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis gene rfbH is required for survival in egg albumen. ZOONOSES AND PUBLIC HEALTH. 2009;56(3):145–9.
MLA
Gantois, Inne, Richard Ducatelle, Frank Pasmans, et al. “The Salmonella Enteritidis Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Gene rfbH Is Required for Survival in Egg Albumen.” ZOONOSES AND PUBLIC HEALTH 56.3 (2009): 145–149. Print.
@article{799390,
  abstract     = {Salmonella Enteritidis is still a major cause of human food borne infections and can be associated with the consumption of meat and chicken eggs. It is the world's most common cause of salmonellosis in part because it has the ability to colonize the oviduct and contaminate eggs. It was shown that when stored at room temperature, S. Enteritidis bacteria can multiply extensively in contaminated eggs. Using the in vivo expression technology, it was shown that the rfbH gene, involved in lipopolysaccharide O-antigen synthesis, is transcriptionally induced during growth in whole eggs at room temperature. A S. Enteritidis Delta rfbH strain was unable to multiply in eggs at room temperature and did not survive in egg white at 42 degrees C. The attenuation was most likely caused by an increased susceptibility of the Delta rfbH mutant to yet undefined antibacterial components of the egg albumen.},
  author       = {Gantois, Inne and Ducatelle, Richard and Pasmans, Frank and Haesebrouck, Freddy and Van Immerseel, Filip},
  issn         = {1863-1959},
  journal      = {ZOONOSES AND PUBLIC HEALTH},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {145--149},
  title        = {The Salmonella enteritidis lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis gene rfbH is required for survival in egg albumen},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1863-2378.2008.01195.x},
  volume       = {56},
  year         = {2009},
}

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