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Growth of sheep fed tannin-rich Albizia gummifera with or without polyethylene glycol

Yisehak Kechero Kebede, Kebede Biruk, Beyene Abegaze and Geert Janssens UGent (2014) TROPICAL ANIMAL HEALTH AND PRODUCTION. 46(7). p.1113-1118
abstract
Twenty-four intact male Bonga lambs were studied in a 100-day experiment to evaluate the effect of feeding tannin rich leaves of Albizia gummifera (AG) on nutrient utilization, growth performance, and carcass composition. The dietary treatments consisted of hay alone (T-1, control), AG at 30 % of control diet + T-1 (T-2), and T-2 + polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG) (T-3, 40 mg PEG, 1 kg AG/head on a dry mass (DM) basis. The lambs were individually fed at 50 g DM/kg live weight. In the last 10 days of the experiment, all animals from each treatment were harnessed with feces collection bags. At the end of the experiment, lambs were slaughtered after overnight fasting for measurements of carcass characteristics. Crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and condensed tannin contents of AG were 300, 586, and 108 g/kg DM, respectively. Lambs fed AG with PEG had higher (P < 0.001) feed intake, digestibility, carcass weight, and weight gain compared with other treatments. Although lambs fed diet T-2 were able to utilize AG, the efficiency of its utilization was lower (P < 0.001) than the PEG-treated groups. The improvement in nutrient intake and digestibility, carcass weight, and growth performance of lambs supplemented with PEG emphasizes the negative effect of tannins on livestock performance. Leaves of AG enhance digestibility and performance in tropical hay-fed sheep, and the addition of PEG further improves this effect, likely due to the binding of tannins.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Growth, Carcass characteristics, GOATS, DEGRADATION, CONDENSED TANNINS, Sheep, Tannin, Polyethylene glycol 6000
journal title
TROPICAL ANIMAL HEALTH AND PRODUCTION
Trop. Anim. Health Prod.
volume
46
issue
7
pages
1113 - 1118
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000342497900002
JCR category
AGRICULTURE, DAIRY & ANIMAL SCIENCE
JCR impact factor
0.817 (2014)
JCR rank
27/57 (2014)
JCR quartile
2 (2014)
ISSN
0049-4747
DOI
10.1007/s11250-014-0605-6
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
7898491
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-7898491
date created
2016-06-28 12:21:39
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:42:08
@article{7898491,
  abstract     = {Twenty-four intact male Bonga lambs were studied in a 100-day experiment to evaluate the effect of feeding tannin rich leaves of Albizia gummifera (AG) on nutrient utilization, growth performance, and carcass composition. The dietary treatments consisted of hay alone (T-1, control), AG at 30 \% of control diet + T-1 (T-2), and T-2 + polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG) (T-3, 40 mg PEG, 1 kg AG/head on a dry mass (DM) basis. The lambs were individually fed at 50 g DM/kg live weight. In the last 10 days of the experiment, all animals from each treatment were harnessed with feces collection bags. At the end of the experiment, lambs were slaughtered after overnight fasting for measurements of carcass characteristics. Crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and condensed tannin contents of AG were 300, 586, and 108 g/kg DM, respectively. Lambs fed AG with PEG had higher (P {\textlangle} 0.001) feed intake, digestibility, carcass weight, and weight gain compared with other treatments. Although lambs fed diet T-2 were able to utilize AG, the efficiency of its utilization was lower (P {\textlangle} 0.001) than the PEG-treated groups. The improvement in nutrient intake and digestibility, carcass weight, and growth performance of lambs supplemented with PEG emphasizes the negative effect of tannins on livestock performance. Leaves of AG enhance digestibility and performance in tropical hay-fed sheep, and the addition of PEG further improves this effect, likely due to the binding of tannins.},
  author       = {Kebede, Yisehak Kechero and Biruk, Kebede and Abegaze, Beyene and Janssens, Geert},
  issn         = {0049-4747},
  journal      = {TROPICAL ANIMAL HEALTH AND PRODUCTION},
  keyword      = {Growth,Carcass characteristics,GOATS,DEGRADATION,CONDENSED TANNINS,Sheep,Tannin,Polyethylene glycol 6000},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1113--1118},
  title        = {Growth of sheep fed tannin-rich Albizia gummifera with or without polyethylene glycol},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11250-014-0605-6},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2014},
}

Chicago
Kebede, Yisehak Kechero, Kebede Biruk, Beyene Abegaze, and Geert Janssens. 2014. “Growth of Sheep Fed Tannin-rich Albizia Gummifera with or Without Polyethylene Glycol.” Tropical Animal Health and Production 46 (7): 1113–1118.
APA
Kebede, Y. K., Biruk, K., Abegaze, B., & Janssens, G. (2014). Growth of sheep fed tannin-rich Albizia gummifera with or without polyethylene glycol. TROPICAL ANIMAL HEALTH AND PRODUCTION, 46(7), 1113–1118.
Vancouver
1.
Kebede YK, Biruk K, Abegaze B, Janssens G. Growth of sheep fed tannin-rich Albizia gummifera with or without polyethylene glycol. TROPICAL ANIMAL HEALTH AND PRODUCTION. 2014;46(7):1113–8.
MLA
Kebede, Yisehak Kechero, Kebede Biruk, Beyene Abegaze, et al. “Growth of Sheep Fed Tannin-rich Albizia Gummifera with or Without Polyethylene Glycol.” TROPICAL ANIMAL HEALTH AND PRODUCTION 46.7 (2014): 1113–1118. Print.