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Comparison of the validity of parentally reported weight, height and BMI among preschool children when measured at home or respectively guessed at by the parents

Charlene Ottevaere (UGent) , Inge Huybrechts (UGent) , Tineke De Vriendt (UGent) and Stefaan De Henauw (UGent)
(2009) Obesity Facts. 2(Suppl 2).
Author
Organization
Abstract
Objective: To compare the validity of parentally reported height, weight and BMI values of pre-school children (3 - 7y), thereby comparing reporting based on measurements at home versus guessing. Methods: The subjects were 297 Belgian pre-school children (52.9% male). Participation rate was 73%. On the basis of a questionnaire, parents reported height and weight of their children and indicated whether this reporting was based on a measurement at home or guessing. For the reference, nurses measured height and weight following standardised procedures. International age- and sex-specific BMI cut-off values were used to determine BMI-categories (IOTF-method). Results: On group level, no important differences were identified in accuracy of reported height, weight and BMI, as compared to the standardized measurements and this was the case in between the two groups considered (measured or reported by the parents). However, for all 3 parameters, the correlations between parental reports and CLB measurements were higher in the group of children whose body parameters were actually measured by the parents. Sensitivity for underweight and overweight/obesity was respectively 73% and 47% when parents measured their child’s height and weight, while only 55% and 47% when parents guessed. Specificity for underweight and overweight/obesity was respectively 82% and 97% when parents measured, while only 75% and 93% when parents guessed. Conclusion: Parentally reported values for height, weight and BMI were better when parents measured their child at home than when they guessed. Therefore, the accuracy of parentally reported values could be improved by stimulating parents to measure their child at home.

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Chicago
Ottevaere, Charlene, Inge Huybrechts, Tineke De Vriendt, and Stefaan De Henauw. 2009. “Comparison of the Validity of Parentally Reported Weight, Height and BMI Among Preschool Children When Measured at Home or Respectively Guessed at by the Parents.” In Obesity Facts, ed. Johannes Hebebrand , 2:98. Karger.
APA
Ottevaere, C., Huybrechts, I., De Vriendt, T., & De Henauw, S. (2009). Comparison of the validity of parentally reported weight, height and BMI among preschool children when measured at home or respectively guessed at by the parents. In J. Hebebrand (Ed.), Obesity Facts (Vol. 2, p. 98). Presented at the 17th European Congress on Obesity, Karger.
Vancouver
1.
Ottevaere C, Huybrechts I, De Vriendt T, De Henauw S. Comparison of the validity of parentally reported weight, height and BMI among preschool children when measured at home or respectively guessed at by the parents. In: Hebebrand J, editor. Obesity Facts. Karger; 2009. p. 98.
MLA
Ottevaere, Charlene, Inge Huybrechts, Tineke De Vriendt, et al. “Comparison of the Validity of Parentally Reported Weight, Height and BMI Among Preschool Children When Measured at Home or Respectively Guessed at by the Parents.” Obesity Facts. Ed. Johannes Hebebrand . Vol. 2. Karger, 2009. 98. Print.
@inproceedings{782742,
  abstract     = {Objective: To compare the validity of parentally reported height, weight
and BMI values of pre-school children (3 - 7y), thereby comparing reporting
based on measurements at home versus guessing.
Methods: The subjects were 297 Belgian pre-school children (52.9\%
male). Participation rate was 73\%. On the basis of a questionnaire, parents
reported height and weight of their children and indicated whether
this reporting was based on a measurement at home or guessing. For
the reference, nurses measured height and weight following standardised
procedures. International age- and sex-specific BMI cut-off values were
used to determine BMI-categories (IOTF-method).
Results: On group level, no important differences were identified in accuracy
of reported height, weight and BMI, as compared to the standardized
measurements and this was the case in between the two groups
considered (measured or reported by the parents). However, for all 3
parameters, the correlations between parental reports and CLB measurements
were higher in the group of children whose body parameters
were actually measured by the parents.
Sensitivity for underweight and overweight/obesity was respectively 73\%
and 47\% when parents measured their child{\textquoteright}s height and weight, while
only 55\% and 47\% when parents guessed. Specificity for underweight
and overweight/obesity was respectively 82\% and 97\% when parents
measured, while only 75\% and 93\% when parents guessed.
Conclusion: Parentally reported values for height, weight and BMI
were better when parents measured their child at home than when they
guessed. Therefore, the accuracy of parentally reported values could be
improved by stimulating parents to measure their child at home.},
  author       = {Ottevaere, Charlene and Huybrechts, Inge and De Vriendt, Tineke and De Henauw, Stefaan},
  booktitle    = {Obesity Facts},
  editor       = {Hebebrand , Johannes},
  issn         = {1662-4025},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Amsterdam, The Netherlands},
  number       = {Suppl 2},
  pages        = {1},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  title        = {Comparison of the validity of parentally reported weight, height and BMI among preschool children when measured at home or respectively guessed at by the parents},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2009},
}