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The evolutionary significance of ancient genome duplications

Yves Van de Peer (UGent) , Steven Maere (UGent) and Axel Meyer
(2009) Nature Reviews Genetics. 10(10). p.725-732
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Abstract
Many organisms are currently polyploid, or have a polyploid ancestry and now have secondarily 'diploidized' genomes. This finding is surprising because retained whole-genome duplications (WGDs) are exceedingly rare, suggesting that polyploidy is usually an evolutionary dead end. We argue that ancient genome doublings could probably have survived only under very specific conditions, but that, whenever established, they might have had a pronounced impact on species diversification, and led to an increase in biological complexity and the origin of evolutionary novelties.
Keywords
VERTEBRATE EVOLUTION, CAMBRIAN EXPLOSION, ANGIOSPERM DIVERSIFICATION, TELEOST FISH, YEAST GENOME, FLOWERING PLANTS, WHOLE-GENOME, RECIPROCAL GENE LOSS, RAY-FINNED FISHES, POLYPLOID PLANTS

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Van de Peer, Yves, Steven Maere, and Axel Meyer. 2009. “The Evolutionary Significance of Ancient Genome Duplications.” Nature Reviews Genetics 10 (10): 725–732.
APA
Van de Peer, Y., Maere, S., & Meyer, A. (2009). The evolutionary significance of ancient genome duplications. Nature Reviews Genetics, 10(10), 725–732.
Vancouver
1.
Van de Peer Y, Maere S, Meyer A. The evolutionary significance of ancient genome duplications. Nature Reviews Genetics. London, UK: Nature Publishing Group; 2009;10(10):725–32.
MLA
Van de Peer, Yves, Steven Maere, and Axel Meyer. “The Evolutionary Significance of Ancient Genome Duplications.” Nature Reviews Genetics 10.10 (2009): 725–732. Print.
@article{771452,
  abstract     = {Many organisms are currently polyploid, or have a polyploid ancestry and now have secondarily 'diploidized' genomes. This finding is surprising because retained whole-genome duplications (WGDs) are exceedingly rare, suggesting that polyploidy is usually an evolutionary dead end. We argue that ancient genome doublings could probably have survived only under very specific conditions, but that, whenever established, they might have had a pronounced impact on species diversification, and led to an increase in biological complexity and the origin of evolutionary novelties.},
  author       = {Van de Peer, Yves and Maere, Steven and Meyer, Axel},
  issn         = {1471-0056},
  journal      = {Nature Reviews Genetics},
  keyword      = {VERTEBRATE EVOLUTION,CAMBRIAN EXPLOSION,ANGIOSPERM DIVERSIFICATION,TELEOST FISH,YEAST GENOME,FLOWERING PLANTS,WHOLE-GENOME,RECIPROCAL GENE LOSS,RAY-FINNED FISHES,POLYPLOID PLANTS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {725--732},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  title        = {The evolutionary significance of ancient genome duplications},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrg2600},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2009},
}

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