Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Nutritional improvement of grass pea and cassava to prevent neurolathyrism and konzo

Fernand Lambein UGent and Yu-Haey Kuo UGent (2009) New approaches to Plant Breeding of Orphan Crops in Africa. Proceedings of an International Conference, 19-21 September 2007, Bern Switzerland. p.179-189
abstract
Grass pea (Lathyrus sativus) is the most drought tolerant legume and a survival food during drought in Ethiopia and the Indian Subcontinent, producing the cheapest dietary protein and saving thousands of lives. It also is a mixed blessing as the cause of an irreversible crippling disease neurolathyrism after prolonged over-consumption. Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is a protein-poor root crop that is the staple food for over half a billion people in Africa, South America and Southeast Asia, where it may be the cheapest source of dietary carbohydrates. Over-consumption of cassava roots in a monotonous diet can cause an irreversible crippling disease konzo, with clinical symptoms indistinguishable from neurolathyrism. The prominent features of both diseases are sudden onset of symmetric spastic paraparesis of the calf muscles and scissor gate. The common feature of grass pea seed and cassava roots is the low content of the essential sulphur containing amino acids methionine and cysteine. The question arises how such different food intake can give rise to such similar symptoms of toxicity and whether the common deficiency in essential amino acids can be the real cause of these crippling diseases. Nevertheless, the focus of breeding has always been the reduction of the neuro-excitatory amino acid beta-ODAP (beta-N-oxalyl-L-alpha,beta-diaminopropionic acid) blamed to be the cause of neurolathyrism in grass pea and the reduction of the cyanogenic glucosinolates in cassava. Developing varieties with higher content in methionine and cysteine may be more relevant in improving nutrition without jeopardizing the tolerance for biotic stress of these crops. An animal model for both diseases does not exist but is essential and urgently needed in order to assess the safety of existing and new varieties.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
in
New approaches to Plant Breeding of Orphan Crops in Africa. Proceedings of an International Conference, 19-21 September 2007, Bern Switzerland
editor
Zerihun Tadele
pages
11 pages
publisher
University of Bern, Switzerland
place of publication
Bern, Switzerland
conference name
New approaches to Plant Breeding of Orphan Crops in Africa
conference location
Bern, Switzerland
conference start
2007-09-19
conference end
2007-09-21
ISBN
978-3-033-02012-2
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C1
copyright statement
I don't know the status of the copyright for this publication
id
760349
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-760349
date created
2009-10-02 21:43:56
date last changed
2009-11-09 08:55:37
@inproceedings{760349,
  abstract     = {Grass pea (Lathyrus sativus) is the most drought tolerant legume and a survival food during drought in Ethiopia and the Indian Subcontinent, producing the cheapest dietary protein and saving thousands of lives. It also is a mixed blessing as the cause of an irreversible crippling disease neurolathyrism after prolonged over-consumption. Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is a protein-poor root crop that is the staple food for over half a billion people in Africa, South America and Southeast Asia, where it may be the cheapest source of dietary carbohydrates. Over-consumption of cassava roots in a monotonous diet can cause an irreversible crippling disease konzo, with clinical symptoms indistinguishable from neurolathyrism. The prominent features of both diseases are sudden onset of symmetric spastic paraparesis of the calf muscles and scissor gate. The common feature of grass pea seed and cassava roots is the low content of the essential sulphur containing amino acids methionine and cysteine. The question arises how such different food intake can give rise to such similar symptoms of toxicity and whether the common deficiency in essential amino acids can be the real cause of these crippling diseases. Nevertheless, the focus of breeding has always been the reduction of the neuro-excitatory amino acid beta-ODAP (beta-N-oxalyl-L-alpha,beta-diaminopropionic acid) blamed to be the cause of neurolathyrism in grass pea and the reduction of the cyanogenic glucosinolates in cassava. Developing varieties with higher content in methionine and cysteine may be more relevant in improving nutrition without jeopardizing the tolerance for biotic stress of these crops. An animal model for both diseases does not exist but is essential and urgently needed in order to assess the safety of existing and new varieties.},
  author       = {Lambein, Fernand and Kuo, Yu-Haey},
  booktitle    = {New approaches to Plant Breeding of Orphan Crops in Africa. Proceedings of an International Conference, 19-21 September 2007, Bern Switzerland},
  editor       = {Tadele, Zerihun},
  isbn         = {978-3-033-02012-2},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Bern, Switzerland},
  pages        = {179--189},
  publisher    = {University of Bern, Switzerland},
  title        = {Nutritional improvement of grass pea and cassava to prevent neurolathyrism and konzo},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Lambein, Fernand, and Yu-Haey Kuo. 2009. “Nutritional Improvement of Grass Pea and Cassava to Prevent Neurolathyrism and Konzo.” In New Approaches to Plant Breeding of Orphan Crops in Africa. Proceedings of an International Conference, 19-21 September 2007, Bern Switzerland, ed. Zerihun Tadele, 179–189. Bern, Switzerland: University of Bern, Switzerland.
APA
Lambein, F., & Kuo, Y.-H. (2009). Nutritional improvement of grass pea and cassava to prevent neurolathyrism and konzo. In Z. Tadele (Ed.), New approaches to Plant Breeding of Orphan Crops in Africa. Proceedings of an International Conference, 19-21 September 2007, Bern Switzerland (pp. 179–189). Presented at the New approaches to Plant Breeding of Orphan Crops in Africa, Bern, Switzerland: University of Bern, Switzerland.
Vancouver
1.
Lambein F, Kuo Y-H. Nutritional improvement of grass pea and cassava to prevent neurolathyrism and konzo. In: Tadele Z, editor. New approaches to Plant Breeding of Orphan Crops in Africa. Proceedings of an International Conference, 19-21 September 2007, Bern Switzerland. Bern, Switzerland: University of Bern, Switzerland; 2009. p. 179–89.
MLA
Lambein, Fernand, and Yu-Haey Kuo. “Nutritional Improvement of Grass Pea and Cassava to Prevent Neurolathyrism and Konzo.” New Approaches to Plant Breeding of Orphan Crops in Africa. Proceedings of an International Conference, 19-21 September 2007, Bern Switzerland. Ed. Zerihun Tadele. Bern, Switzerland: University of Bern, Switzerland, 2009. 179–189. Print.