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Optimisation of a two-stage heat treatment process: durability aspects

M. J. Boonstra, Joris Van Acker UGent, E. Kegel and M. Stevens (2007) WOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 41(1). p.31-57
abstract
Heat treatment of wood at relatively high temperatures (in the range of 150-280 degrees C) is an effective method to improve biological durability of wood. This study was performed to investigate the effect of heat treatment process optimisation on the resistance against fungal attack, including basidiomycetes, molds and blue stain fungi. An industrially used two-stage heat treatment method under relatively mild conditions (< 200 degrees C) was used to treat the boards. Heat treatment of radiata pine sapwood revealed a clear improvement of the resistance against the brown rot fungi Coniophora puteana and Poria placenta. Increasing process temperature and/or effective process time during the first process stage, the hydro thermolysis, appeared to affect the resistance against C. puteana attack, but the effect on the resistance against P. placenta was rather limited. Heat treated radiata pine showed a limited resistance against the white rot fungus Coriolus versicolor and process variations during the hydro thermolysis stage appeared not to affect this resistance. A clear difference between the resistance of heat treated Scots pine sapwood and heartwood against fungal attack is observed. Scots pine heartwood showed a higher resistance against C. puteana and P. placenta but also against the white rot fungus C. versicolor. Similar results were obtained when heat treated birch was exposed to brown and white rot fungi. Heat treatment showed an improved resistance against C. puteana attack, especially at higher temperatures during the hydro thermolysis stage. A clear improvement of the durability was also observed after exposure to the white rot fungus C. versicolor and especially Stereum hirsutum. Increasing the process temperature or process time during the hydro thermolysis stage appeared to have a limited effect on the resistance against C. versicolor attack. Heat treated radiata pine and Norway spruce were still susceptible to mold growth on the wood surface, probably due to the formation of hemicelluloses degradation products (e.g. sugars) during heat treatment. Remarkable is the absence of blue stain fungi on heat treated wood specimen, also because the abandant blue stain fungi were observed on untreated specimen. Molecular reasons for the resistance of heat treated wood against fungal attack are discussed in detail contributing to a better understanding of heat treatment methods.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
keyword
ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY, HYDROXYL RADICALS, PHANEROCHAETE-CHRYSOSPORIUM, EXTRACELLULAR SUBSTANCE, WHITE-ROT, HEAVILY DEGRADED LIGNINS, THERMALLY MODIFIED WOOD, BASIDIOMYCETE GLOEOPHYLLUM-TRABEUM, BROWN-ROT FUNGI, HYDROGEN-PEROXIDE
journal title
WOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
WOOD SCI TECHNOL
volume
41
issue
1
pages
31 - 57
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000243399600003
JCR category
MATERIALS SCIENCE, PAPER & WOOD
JCR impact factor
0.691 (2007)
JCR rank
5/18 (2007)
JCR quartile
1 (2007)
ISSN
0043-7719
DOI
10.1007/s00226-006-0087-4
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
742251
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-742251
date created
2009-09-09 08:58:31
date last changed
2010-05-19 09:17:56
@article{742251,
  abstract     = {Heat treatment of wood at relatively high temperatures (in the range of 150-280 degrees C) is an effective method to improve biological durability of wood. This study was performed to investigate the effect of heat treatment process optimisation on the resistance against fungal attack, including basidiomycetes, molds and blue stain fungi. An industrially used two-stage heat treatment method under relatively mild conditions ({\textlangle} 200 degrees C) was used to treat the boards. Heat treatment of radiata pine sapwood revealed a clear improvement of the resistance against the brown rot fungi Coniophora puteana and Poria placenta. Increasing process temperature and/or effective process time during the first process stage, the hydro thermolysis, appeared to affect the resistance against C. puteana attack, but the effect on the resistance against P. placenta was rather limited. Heat treated radiata pine showed a limited resistance against the white rot fungus Coriolus versicolor and process variations during the hydro thermolysis stage appeared not to affect this resistance. A clear difference between the resistance of heat treated Scots pine sapwood and heartwood against fungal attack is observed. Scots pine heartwood showed a higher resistance against C. puteana and P. placenta but also against the white rot fungus C. versicolor. Similar results were obtained when heat treated birch was exposed to brown and white rot fungi. Heat treatment showed an improved resistance against C. puteana attack, especially at higher temperatures during the hydro thermolysis stage. A clear improvement of the durability was also observed after exposure to the white rot fungus C. versicolor and especially Stereum hirsutum. Increasing the process temperature or process time during the hydro thermolysis stage appeared to have a limited effect on the resistance against C. versicolor attack. Heat treated radiata pine and Norway spruce were still susceptible to mold growth on the wood surface, probably due to the formation of hemicelluloses degradation products (e.g. sugars) during heat treatment. Remarkable is the absence of blue stain fungi on heat treated wood specimen, also because the abandant blue stain fungi were observed on untreated specimen. Molecular reasons for the resistance of heat treated wood against fungal attack are discussed in detail contributing to a better understanding of heat treatment methods.},
  author       = {Boonstra, M. J. and Van Acker, Joris and Kegel, E. and Stevens, M.},
  issn         = {0043-7719},
  journal      = {WOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY},
  keyword      = {ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY,HYDROXYL RADICALS,PHANEROCHAETE-CHRYSOSPORIUM,EXTRACELLULAR SUBSTANCE,WHITE-ROT,HEAVILY DEGRADED LIGNINS,THERMALLY MODIFIED WOOD,BASIDIOMYCETE GLOEOPHYLLUM-TRABEUM,BROWN-ROT FUNGI,HYDROGEN-PEROXIDE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {31--57},
  title        = {Optimisation of a two-stage heat treatment process: durability aspects},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00226-006-0087-4},
  volume       = {41},
  year         = {2007},
}

Chicago
Boonstra, M. J., Joris Van Acker, E. Kegel, and M. Stevens. 2007. “Optimisation of a Two-stage Heat Treatment Process: Durability Aspects.” Wood Science and Technology 41 (1): 31–57.
APA
Boonstra, M. J., Van Acker, J., Kegel, E., & Stevens, M. (2007). Optimisation of a two-stage heat treatment process: durability aspects. WOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 41(1), 31–57.
Vancouver
1.
Boonstra MJ, Van Acker J, Kegel E, Stevens M. Optimisation of a two-stage heat treatment process: durability aspects. WOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 2007;41(1):31–57.
MLA
Boonstra, M. J., Joris Van Acker, E. Kegel, et al. “Optimisation of a Two-stage Heat Treatment Process: Durability Aspects.” WOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 41.1 (2007): 31–57. Print.