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Influence of heat treatment on spray-dried mixtures of Amioca (R) starch and Carbopol (R) 974P used as carriers for nasal drug delivery

Delphine Coucke UGent, Eveline Pringels, P Foreman, P Adriaensens, R Carleer, Jean Paul Remon UGent and Chris Vervaet UGent (2009) INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PHARMACEUTICS. 378(1-2). p.45-50
abstract
A mucoadhesive spray-dried starch/poly(acrylic acid) powder underwent different heat treatments in order to induce cross-linking between the functional groups of starch (Amioca (R)) and poly(acrylic acid) (Carbopol (R) 974P). After heat treatment the water-absorbing capacity, viscosity and elasticity of the mucoadhesive powder increased. NMR analysis in combination with FT-IR indicated that heat treatment induced a low degree of cross-linking between the polymers. Nasal administration of Amioca (R)/Carbopol (R) 974P powders without heat treatment resulted in an absolute bioavailability in rabbits of 8.2 +/- 3.0% for insulin. Due to the difference in water-absorbing capacity (which opened the tight junctions of the nasal mucosa), elasticity and plasticity (which reduced mucociliairy clearance and prolonged residence time) heat treatment at 120 degrees C improved the bioavailability: 26.4 +/- 21.9, 36.5 +/- 11.0 and 19.3 +/- 17.3% after heat treatment during 30 min, 1 h and 4 h, respectively. Heat treatment at 60 degrees C was less efficient. This study demonstrated that the nasal insulin absorption improved via heat treatment of the Amioca (R)/Carbopol (R) 974P powder (prior to the addition of insulin). The bioavailability-enhancing effect of a 1 h heat treatment at 120 degrees C was confirmed using the same polymer matrix in combination with different drugs (salmon calcitonin, human growth hormone and metoprolol tartrate). (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Amioca (R)/Carbopol (R) 974P powder formulation, NMR spectroscopy, Heat treatment, ABSORPTION, INSULIN, MICROSPHERES, Insulin, Nasal delivery, SYSTEM
journal title
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PHARMACEUTICS
Int. J. Pharm.
volume
378
issue
1-2
pages
45 - 50
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000269163600007
JCR category
PHARMACOLOGY & PHARMACY
JCR impact factor
2.962 (2009)
JCR rank
78/236 (2009)
JCR quartile
2 (2009)
ISSN
0378-5173
DOI
10.1016/j.ijpharm.2009.05.041
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I don't know the status of the copyright for this publication
id
740862
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-740862
date created
2009-09-04 14:37:06
date last changed
2009-09-07 08:31:27
@article{740862,
  abstract     = {A mucoadhesive spray-dried starch/poly(acrylic acid) powder underwent different heat treatments in order to induce cross-linking between the functional groups of starch (Amioca (R)) and poly(acrylic acid) (Carbopol (R) 974P). After heat treatment the water-absorbing capacity, viscosity and elasticity of the mucoadhesive powder increased. NMR analysis in combination with FT-IR indicated that heat treatment induced a low degree of cross-linking between the polymers. Nasal administration of Amioca (R)/Carbopol (R) 974P powders without heat treatment resulted in an absolute bioavailability in rabbits of 8.2 +/- 3.0\% for insulin. Due to the difference in water-absorbing capacity (which opened the tight junctions of the nasal mucosa), elasticity and plasticity (which reduced mucociliairy clearance and prolonged residence time) heat treatment at 120 degrees C improved the bioavailability: 26.4 +/- 21.9, 36.5 +/- 11.0 and 19.3 +/- 17.3\% after heat treatment during 30 min, 1 h and 4 h, respectively. Heat treatment at 60 degrees C was less efficient. This study demonstrated that the nasal insulin absorption improved via heat treatment of the Amioca (R)/Carbopol (R) 974P powder (prior to the addition of insulin). The bioavailability-enhancing effect of a 1 h heat treatment at 120 degrees C was confirmed using the same polymer matrix in combination with different drugs (salmon calcitonin, human growth hormone and metoprolol tartrate). (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Coucke, Delphine and Pringels, Eveline and Foreman, P and Adriaensens, P and Carleer, R and Remon, Jean Paul and Vervaet, Chris},
  issn         = {0378-5173},
  journal      = {INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PHARMACEUTICS},
  keyword      = {Amioca (R)/Carbopol (R) 974P powder formulation,NMR spectroscopy,Heat treatment,ABSORPTION,INSULIN,MICROSPHERES,Insulin,Nasal delivery,SYSTEM},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {45--50},
  title        = {Influence of heat treatment on spray-dried mixtures of Amioca (R) starch and Carbopol (R) 974P used as carriers for nasal drug delivery},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2009.05.041},
  volume       = {378},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Coucke, Delphine, Eveline Pringels, P Foreman, P Adriaensens, R Carleer, Jean Paul Remon, and Chris Vervaet. 2009. “Influence of Heat Treatment on Spray-dried Mixtures of Amioca (R) Starch and Carbopol (R) 974P Used as Carriers for Nasal Drug Delivery.” International Journal of Pharmaceutics 378 (1-2): 45–50.
APA
Coucke, D., Pringels, E., Foreman, P., Adriaensens, P., Carleer, R., Remon, J. P., & Vervaet, C. (2009). Influence of heat treatment on spray-dried mixtures of Amioca (R) starch and Carbopol (R) 974P used as carriers for nasal drug delivery. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PHARMACEUTICS, 378(1-2), 45–50.
Vancouver
1.
Coucke D, Pringels E, Foreman P, Adriaensens P, Carleer R, Remon JP, et al. Influence of heat treatment on spray-dried mixtures of Amioca (R) starch and Carbopol (R) 974P used as carriers for nasal drug delivery. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PHARMACEUTICS. 2009;378(1-2):45–50.
MLA
Coucke, Delphine, Eveline Pringels, P Foreman, et al. “Influence of Heat Treatment on Spray-dried Mixtures of Amioca (R) Starch and Carbopol (R) 974P Used as Carriers for Nasal Drug Delivery.” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PHARMACEUTICS 378.1-2 (2009): 45–50. Print.