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Hearing in children with congenital cytomegalovirus infection: results of a longitudinal study

JULIE GODERIS, ANNELIES KEYMEULEN, Koenraad Smets UGent, Helen Van Hoecke UGent, Els De Leenheer UGent, An Boudewyns, Christian Desloovere, Rudolf Kuhweide, Marie Muylle, Liesbeth Royackers, et al. (2016) JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS. 172. p.110-115
abstract
Objectives: To evaluate hearing outcome, to characterize the nature of symptomatic and asymptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection and associated hearing loss, and to compare results with data from previous studies. Study design: A prospective multicenter registry was set up in 2007. Six centers participated in the development of a standardized protocol for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. Data were gathered in an online registry. Children (n = 379) with a documented cCMV infection and at least 2 separate audiologic evaluations were included. Audiometric results from a multicenter cohort study of children with cCMV infection with longitudinal observation were examined. Results: Results from 123 children with a symptomatic and 256 children with an asymptomatic cCMV infection were analyzed. In the group with symptomatic cCMV, 63% had hearing loss, compared with 8% in the group with asymptomatic cCMV. Delayed-onset hearing loss occurred in 10.6% of symptomatic cCMV and in 7.8% of asymptomatic cCMV. In the group with symptomatic cCMV, 29.3% of children used some kind of hearing amplification; 1.6% in the group with asymptomatic cCMV used hearing amplification. Conclusions: Symptomatic and asymptomatic cCMV infections are a major cause of hearing loss in childhood. Reliable estimates of the long-term outcome of cCMV infection are mandatory to increase vigilance, especially among pregnant women and to draw attention to preventive measures, vaccine development, and prenatal and postnatal therapy. Universal screening of newborns for cCMV infection should be initiated and combined with longitudinal audiometric follow-up.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
METAANALYSIS, CMV INFECTION, THRESHOLDS, PREVALENCE, MANAGEMENT, MORTALITY, SEQUELAE
journal title
JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS
J. Pediatr.
volume
172
pages
110 - 115
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000375209600020
JCR category
PEDIATRICS
JCR impact factor
3.874 (2016)
JCR rank
6/121 (2016)
JCR quartile
1 (2016)
ISSN
0022-3476
DOI
10.1016/j.jpeds.2016.01.024
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
7279407
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-7279407
date created
2016-06-23 12:05:24
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:45:23
@article{7279407,
  abstract     = {Objectives: To evaluate hearing outcome, to characterize the nature of symptomatic and asymptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection and associated hearing loss, and to compare results with data from previous studies. 
Study design: A prospective multicenter registry was set up in 2007. Six centers participated in the development of a standardized protocol for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. Data were gathered in an online registry. Children (n = 379) with a documented cCMV infection and at least 2 separate audiologic evaluations were included. Audiometric results from a multicenter cohort study of children with cCMV infection with longitudinal observation were examined. 
Results: Results from 123 children with a symptomatic and 256 children with an asymptomatic cCMV infection were analyzed. In the group with symptomatic cCMV, 63\% had hearing loss, compared with 8\% in the group with asymptomatic cCMV. Delayed-onset hearing loss occurred in 10.6\% of symptomatic cCMV and in 7.8\% of asymptomatic cCMV. In the group with symptomatic cCMV, 29.3\% of children used some kind of hearing amplification; 1.6\% in the group with asymptomatic cCMV used hearing amplification. 
Conclusions: Symptomatic and asymptomatic cCMV infections are a major cause of hearing loss in childhood. Reliable estimates of the long-term outcome of cCMV infection are mandatory to increase vigilance, especially among pregnant women and to draw attention to preventive measures, vaccine development, and prenatal and postnatal therapy. Universal screening of newborns for cCMV infection should be initiated and combined with longitudinal audiometric follow-up.},
  author       = {GODERIS, JULIE and KEYMEULEN, ANNELIES and Smets, Koenraad and Van Hoecke, Helen and De Leenheer, Els and Boudewyns, An and Desloovere, Christian and Kuhweide, Rudolf and Muylle, Marie and Royackers, Liesbeth and Schatteman, Isabelle and Dhooge, Ingeborg},
  issn         = {0022-3476},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS},
  keyword      = {METAANALYSIS,CMV INFECTION,THRESHOLDS,PREVALENCE,MANAGEMENT,MORTALITY,SEQUELAE},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {110--115},
  title        = {Hearing in children with congenital cytomegalovirus infection: results of a longitudinal study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2016.01.024},
  volume       = {172},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
GODERIS, JULIE, ANNELIES KEYMEULEN, Koenraad Smets, Helen Van Hoecke, Els De Leenheer, An Boudewyns, Christian Desloovere, et al. 2016. “Hearing in Children with Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: Results of a Longitudinal Study.” Journal of Pediatrics 172: 110–115.
APA
GODERIS, J., KEYMEULEN, A., Smets, K., Van Hoecke, H., De Leenheer, E., Boudewyns, A., Desloovere, C., et al. (2016). Hearing in children with congenital cytomegalovirus infection: results of a longitudinal study. JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS, 172, 110–115.
Vancouver
1.
GODERIS J, KEYMEULEN A, Smets K, Van Hoecke H, De Leenheer E, Boudewyns A, et al. Hearing in children with congenital cytomegalovirus infection: results of a longitudinal study. JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS. 2016;172:110–5.
MLA
GODERIS, JULIE, ANNELIES KEYMEULEN, Koenraad Smets, et al. “Hearing in Children with Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: Results of a Longitudinal Study.” JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS 172 (2016): 110–115. Print.