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Glycosylation in Tribolium castaneum: composition, physiological significance and exploitation for pest control

Tomasz Walski (UGent)
(2016)
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Abstract
The majority of all the proteins undergoes glycosylation. This post-translational modification of proteins is involved in numerous biological processes and an erroneous glycosylation is often lethal. Following this logic interference with insect glycosylation is likely to be an effective way to control insect pests. Unfortunately, most of the knowledge on insect glycobiology comes from the research on Drosophila which lacks relevance in the context of pest insect control. This work focused on the discovery of the physiological importance of N-glycosylation in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, which is a pest and a model insect. Additionally, this PhD thesis investigates the use of glycan-binding proteins (lectins) and the disruption of N-glycosylation as control strategies against pest beetles. Lectins have high insecticidal activity against insect cells but when fed to the red flour beetle their efficiency was greatly impaired by susceptibility to proteolysis, low efficiency of passing through the peritrophic matrix and inefficient transport to the hemolymph. These factors restricting the insecticidal properties of lectins could be generalized to virtually all insecticidal proteins. Therefore these data can be used for a more rational selection of novel insecticidal toxins and enhancement of the activity of the currently used ones. By studying glycan composition, gene expression analysis and functional genomics it was determined that N-glycosylation is involved in insect metamorphosis. Regulated production of N-glycans was crucial for larval growth, progression of the life stages and development of adult appendages. Finally, disruption of the early stages of the N-glycosylation pathway appears to be promising strategy for future control of insect pests.
Keywords
pest control, lectins, Glycosylation, post-translational modifications, RNAi

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Walski, Tomasz. 2016. “Glycosylation in Tribolium Castaneum: Composition, Physiological Significance and Exploitation for Pest Control”. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering.
APA
Walski, T. (2016). Glycosylation in Tribolium castaneum: composition, physiological significance and exploitation for pest control. Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent, Belgium.
Vancouver
1.
Walski T. Glycosylation in Tribolium castaneum: composition, physiological significance and exploitation for pest control. [Ghent, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering; 2016.
MLA
Walski, Tomasz. “Glycosylation in Tribolium Castaneum: Composition, Physiological Significance and Exploitation for Pest Control.” 2016 : n. pag. Print.
@phdthesis{7262874,
  abstract     = {The majority of all the proteins undergoes glycosylation. This post-translational modification of proteins is involved in numerous biological processes and an erroneous glycosylation is often lethal. Following this logic interference with insect glycosylation is likely to be an effective way to control insect pests. Unfortunately, most of the knowledge on insect glycobiology comes from the research on Drosophila which lacks relevance in the context of pest insect control. This work focused on the discovery of the physiological importance of N-glycosylation in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, which is a pest and a model insect. Additionally, this PhD thesis investigates the use of glycan-binding proteins (lectins) and the disruption of N-glycosylation as control strategies against pest beetles. 
Lectins have high insecticidal activity against insect cells but when fed to the red flour beetle their efficiency was greatly impaired by susceptibility to proteolysis, low efficiency of passing through the peritrophic matrix and inefficient transport to the hemolymph. These factors restricting the insecticidal properties of lectins could be generalized to virtually all insecticidal proteins. Therefore these data can be used for a more rational selection of novel insecticidal toxins and enhancement of the activity of the currently used ones. By studying glycan composition, gene expression analysis and functional genomics it was determined that N-glycosylation is involved in insect metamorphosis. Regulated production of N-glycans was crucial for larval growth, progression of the life stages and development of adult appendages. Finally, disruption of the early stages of the N-glycosylation pathway appears to be promising strategy for future control of insect pests.},
  author       = {Walski, Tomasz},
  isbn         = {9789059899018},
  keyword      = {pest control,lectins,Glycosylation,post-translational modifications,RNAi},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {X, 214},
  publisher    = {Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {Glycosylation in Tribolium castaneum: composition, physiological significance and exploitation for pest control},
  year         = {2016},
}