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Microbial shifts associated with necrotic enteritis

(2016) AVIAN PATHOLOGY. 45(3). p.308-312
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Abstract
An outbreak of necrotic enteritis (NE) is a complex process requiring one or a number of predisposing factors rather than just the presence of pathogenic Clostridium perfringens. Examples are dietary influences, such as high levels of non-starch polysaccharides and fishmeal, and factors that evoke epithelial cell damage, such as Fusarium mycotoxins in feed and Eimeria infections. Recent studies have shown that different predisposing factors induce similar shifts in the intestinal microbiota composition. Butyrate-producing-strains of the Ruminococcaceae family are decreased in abundance by both fishmeal and Eimeria. Similarly, a decreased abundance of butyrate-producing-strains belonging to the Lachnospiraceae family has been induced by fishmeal. Also shifts are observed in the lactic acid-producing bacteria, such as decreased abundance of Lactobacillus johnsonii or Weissella confusa, when broilers were fed a fishmeal-based diet or a Fusarium mycotoxin contaminated diet. Finally, the abundance of Candidatus Savagella was decreased in broilers following Eimeria challenge or feeding a fumonisins contaminated diet. The nature of the microbiota shifts indicate that immune modulatory actions of the intestinal microbiota may play a critical role in the effect on the necrosis inducing activity of C. perfringens. Indeed, colonization with butyrate-producing bacteria plays a key role in counteracting inflammation in the gut and preserving intestinal integrity, while Candidatus Savagella is involved in stimulating Th17 and immunoglobulin A responses. Lactic acid bacteria stimulate colonization of lactate-utilizing and butyrate-producing Lachnospiraceae. Future research needs to clarify the role of the microbiota changes in the pathogenesis of NE.
Keywords
microbiota, short-chain fatty acids, necrotic enteritis, Clostridium perfringens, chicken, SEGMENTED FILAMENTOUS BACTERIA, CLOSTRIDIUM-PERFRINGENS, BROILER-CHICKENS, CANDIDATUS-ARTHROMITUS, INTESTINAL MICROBIOME, PREDISPOSING FACTORS, GENOME SEQUENCE, COLONIZATION, POULTRY, GUT

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Chicago
Antonissen, Gunther, Venessa Eeckhaut, Karolien Van Driessche, Lonneke Onrust, Freddy Haesebrouck, Richard Ducatelle, Robert J Moore, and Filip Van Immerseel. 2016. “Microbial Shifts Associated with Necrotic Enteritis.” Avian Pathology 45 (3): 308–312.
APA
Antonissen, G., Eeckhaut, V., Van Driessche, K., Onrust, L., Haesebrouck, F., Ducatelle, R., Moore, R. J., et al. (2016). Microbial shifts associated with necrotic enteritis. AVIAN PATHOLOGY, 45(3), 308–312.
Vancouver
1.
Antonissen G, Eeckhaut V, Van Driessche K, Onrust L, Haesebrouck F, Ducatelle R, et al. Microbial shifts associated with necrotic enteritis. AVIAN PATHOLOGY. 2016;45(3):308–12.
MLA
Antonissen, Gunther, Venessa Eeckhaut, Karolien Van Driessche, et al. “Microbial Shifts Associated with Necrotic Enteritis.” AVIAN PATHOLOGY 45.3 (2016): 308–312. Print.
@article{7262292,
  abstract     = {An outbreak of necrotic enteritis (NE) is a complex process requiring one or a number of predisposing factors rather than just the presence of pathogenic Clostridium perfringens. Examples are dietary influences, such as high levels of non-starch polysaccharides and fishmeal, and factors that evoke epithelial cell damage, such as Fusarium mycotoxins in feed and Eimeria infections. Recent studies have shown that different predisposing factors induce similar shifts in the intestinal microbiota composition. Butyrate-producing-strains of the Ruminococcaceae family are decreased in abundance by both fishmeal and Eimeria. Similarly, a decreased abundance of butyrate-producing-strains belonging to the Lachnospiraceae family has been induced by fishmeal. Also shifts are observed in the lactic acid-producing bacteria, such as decreased abundance of Lactobacillus johnsonii or Weissella confusa, when broilers were fed a fishmeal-based diet or a Fusarium mycotoxin contaminated diet. Finally, the abundance of Candidatus Savagella was decreased in broilers following Eimeria challenge or feeding a fumonisins contaminated diet. The nature of the microbiota shifts indicate that immune modulatory actions of the intestinal microbiota may play a critical role in the effect on the necrosis inducing activity of C. perfringens. Indeed, colonization with butyrate-producing bacteria plays a key role in counteracting inflammation in the gut and preserving intestinal integrity, while Candidatus Savagella is involved in stimulating Th17 and immunoglobulin A responses. Lactic acid bacteria stimulate colonization of lactate-utilizing and butyrate-producing Lachnospiraceae. Future research needs to clarify the role of the microbiota changes in the pathogenesis of NE.},
  author       = {Antonissen, Gunther and Eeckhaut, Venessa and Van Driessche, Karolien and Onrust, Lonneke and Haesebrouck, Freddy and Ducatelle, Richard and Moore, Robert J and Van Immerseel, Filip},
  issn         = {0307-9457},
  journal      = {AVIAN PATHOLOGY},
  keyword      = {microbiota,short-chain fatty acids,necrotic enteritis,Clostridium perfringens,chicken,SEGMENTED FILAMENTOUS BACTERIA,CLOSTRIDIUM-PERFRINGENS,BROILER-CHICKENS,CANDIDATUS-ARTHROMITUS,INTESTINAL MICROBIOME,PREDISPOSING FACTORS,GENOME SEQUENCE,COLONIZATION,POULTRY,GUT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {308--312},
  title        = {Microbial shifts associated with necrotic enteritis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03079457.2016.1152625},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {2016},
}

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