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Functional assessment of the cervical spine in F-16 pilots with and without neck pain

Veerle De Loose UGent, Marieke Van den Oord, Frederic Burnotte, Damien Van Tiggelen UGent, Veerle Stevens UGent, Barbara Cagnie UGent, Lieven Danneels UGent and Erik Witvrouw UGent (2009) AVIATION SPACE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE. 80(5). p.477-481
abstract
Introduction: Spinal symptoms in fighter pilots are a serious aeromedical problem. The most common neck complaints are muscular pain and strain. The aim of the current study was to determine possible differences in the cervical range of motion (CROM), neck position sense, and neck muscle strength between pilots with and without neck pain. Methods: There were 90 male F-I 6 pilots who volunteered, of which 17 had experienced bilateral neck pain. A standardized questionnaire was used to collect personal information. The maximum isometric neck flexion/extension and lateral flexion strength, the neck position sense, and the cervical range of motion were measured. Results: There were no significant differences between healthy pilots and those with neck pain concerning neck Muscle strength and neck position sense. The neck pain group had a limited CROM in the sagittal plane (130 degrees; CI: 116 degrees-144 degrees) and in the transversal plane (155 degrees; CI: 140 degrees-170 degrees) compared to the healthy pilots. Discussion: In the current study we screened for different motor skills so that deficits Could be detected and retraining programs could be implemented when necessary. According to our results, individual retraining programs might reduce neck pain and therefore a well-instructed training program to maintain a proper active CROM should be implemented. Future Studies should investigate the effectiveness of this kind of program.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
proprioception, mobility, strength, rehabilitation, CERVICOCEPHALIC KINESTHETIC SENSIBILITY, HIGH-PERFORMANCE AIRCRAFT, FIGHTER PILOTS, POSITION SENSE, OFFICE WORKERS, MUSCLE STRAIN, RISK-FACTORS, INJURY, HEAD, STRENGTH
journal title
AVIATION SPACE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE
Aviat. Space Environ. Med.
volume
80
issue
5
pages
477 - 481
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000265550800008
JCR category
MEDICINE, GENERAL & INTERNAL
JCR impact factor
0.993 (2009)
JCR rank
76/132 (2009)
JCR quartile
3 (2009)
ISSN
0095-6562
DOI
10.3357/ASEM.2408.2009
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
724949
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-724949
date created
2009-08-11 11:40:23
date last changed
2012-02-08 12:55:23
@article{724949,
  abstract     = {Introduction: Spinal symptoms in fighter pilots are a serious aeromedical problem. The most common neck complaints are muscular pain and strain. The aim of the current study was to determine possible differences in the cervical range of motion (CROM), neck position sense, and neck muscle strength between pilots with and without neck pain. Methods: There were 90 male F-I 6 pilots who volunteered, of which 17 had experienced bilateral neck pain. A standardized questionnaire was used to collect personal information. The maximum isometric neck flexion/extension and lateral flexion strength, the neck position sense, and the cervical range of motion were measured. Results: There were no significant differences between healthy pilots and those with neck pain concerning neck Muscle strength and neck position sense. The neck pain group had a limited CROM in the sagittal plane (130 degrees; CI: 116 degrees-144 degrees) and in the transversal plane (155 degrees; CI: 140 degrees-170 degrees) compared to the healthy pilots. Discussion: In the current study we screened for different motor skills so that deficits Could be detected and retraining programs could be implemented when necessary. According to our results, individual retraining programs might reduce neck pain and therefore a well-instructed training program to maintain a proper active CROM should be implemented. Future Studies should investigate the effectiveness of this kind of program.},
  author       = {De Loose, Veerle and Van den Oord, Marieke and Burnotte, Frederic and Van Tiggelen, Damien and Stevens, Veerle and Cagnie, Barbara and Danneels, Lieven and Witvrouw, Erik},
  issn         = {0095-6562},
  journal      = {AVIATION SPACE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE},
  keyword      = {proprioception,mobility,strength,rehabilitation,CERVICOCEPHALIC KINESTHETIC SENSIBILITY,HIGH-PERFORMANCE AIRCRAFT,FIGHTER PILOTS,POSITION SENSE,OFFICE WORKERS,MUSCLE STRAIN,RISK-FACTORS,INJURY,HEAD,STRENGTH},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {477--481},
  title        = {Functional assessment of the cervical spine in F-16 pilots with and without neck pain},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3357/ASEM.2408.2009},
  volume       = {80},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
De Loose, Veerle, Marieke Van den Oord, Frederic Burnotte, Damien Van Tiggelen, Veerle Stevens, Barbara Cagnie, Lieven Danneels, and Erik Witvrouw. 2009. “Functional Assessment of the Cervical Spine in F-16 Pilots with and Without Neck Pain.” Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine 80 (5): 477–481.
APA
De Loose, V., Van den Oord, M., Burnotte, F., Van Tiggelen, D., Stevens, V., Cagnie, B., Danneels, L., et al. (2009). Functional assessment of the cervical spine in F-16 pilots with and without neck pain. AVIATION SPACE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, 80(5), 477–481.
Vancouver
1.
De Loose V, Van den Oord M, Burnotte F, Van Tiggelen D, Stevens V, Cagnie B, et al. Functional assessment of the cervical spine in F-16 pilots with and without neck pain. AVIATION SPACE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE. 2009;80(5):477–81.
MLA
De Loose, Veerle, Marieke Van den Oord, Frederic Burnotte, et al. “Functional Assessment of the Cervical Spine in F-16 Pilots with and Without Neck Pain.” AVIATION SPACE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE 80.5 (2009): 477–481. Print.