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Indirect rapid prototyping : opening up unprecedented opportunities in scaffold design and applications

Annemie Houben UGent, Jasper Van Hoorick UGent, Jürgen Van Erps, Hugo Thienpont UGent, Sandra Van Vlierberghe UGent and Peter Dubruel UGent (2017) ANNALS OF BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING. 45(1). p.58-83
abstract
Over the past decades, solid freeform fabrication (SFF) has emerged as the main technology for the production of scaffolds for tissue engineering applications as a result of the architectural versatility. However, certain limitations have also arisen, primarily associated with the available, rather limited range of materials suitable for processing. To overcome these limitations, several research groups have been exploring novel methodologies through which a construct, generated via SFF, is applied as a sacrificial mould for production of the final construct. The technique combines the benefits of SFF techniques in terms of controlled, patient-specific design with a large freedom in material selection associated with conventional scaffold production techniques. Consequently, well-defined 3D scaffolds can be generated in a straightforward manner from previously difficult to print and even "unprintable" materials due to thermomechanical properties that do not match the often strict temperature and pressure requirements for direct rapid prototyping. These include several biomaterials, thermally degradable materials, ceramics and composites. Since it can be combined with conventional pore forming techniques, indirect rapid prototyping (iRP) enables the creation of a hierarchical porosity in the final scaffold with micropores inside the struts. Consequently, scaffolds and implants for applications in both soft and hard tissue regeneration have been reported. In this review, an overview of different iRP strategies and materials are presented from the first reports of the approach at the turn of the century until now.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Indirect 3D printing, Lost-Mould, Indirect Solid Free Form Fabrication, Indirect Rapid Prototyping, Tissue Engineering, SOLID FREEFORM FABRICATION, 3-DIMENSIONAL MICROVASCULAR NETWORKS, CALCIUM-PHOSPHATE SCAFFOLDS, MARROW STROMAL CELLS, COMPOSITE SCAFFOLDS, BONE REGENERATION, PORE-SIZE, POLYCAPROLACTONE SCAFFOLDS, HYDROXYAPATITE SCAFFOLDS, INTERNAL ARCHITECTURE
journal title
ANNALS OF BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING
Ann. Biomed. Eng.
volume
45
issue
1
issue title
Additive manufacturing of biomaterials, tissues, and organs
pages
58 - 83
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000391923100005
ISSN
0090-6964
DOI
10.1007/s10439-016-1610-x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
additional info
the first two authors have contributed equally to this work
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
7236420
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-7236420
date created
2016-05-27 16:29:41
date last changed
2017-05-18 07:51:01
@article{7236420,
  abstract     = {Over the past decades, solid freeform fabrication (SFF) has emerged as the main technology for the production of scaffolds for tissue engineering applications as a result of the architectural versatility. However, certain limitations have also arisen, primarily associated with the available, rather limited range of materials suitable for processing. To overcome these limitations, several research groups have been exploring novel methodologies through which a construct, generated via SFF, is applied as a sacrificial mould for production of the final construct. The technique combines the benefits of SFF techniques in terms of controlled, patient-specific design with a large freedom in material selection associated with conventional scaffold production techniques. Consequently, well-defined 3D scaffolds can be generated in a straightforward manner from previously difficult to print and even {\textacutedbl}unprintable{\textacutedbl} materials due to thermomechanical properties that do not match the often strict temperature and pressure requirements for direct rapid prototyping. These include several biomaterials, thermally degradable materials, ceramics and composites. Since it can be combined with conventional pore forming techniques, indirect rapid prototyping (iRP) enables the creation of a hierarchical porosity in the final scaffold with micropores inside the struts. Consequently, scaffolds and implants for applications in both soft and hard tissue regeneration have been reported. In this review, an overview of different iRP strategies and materials are presented from the first reports of the approach at the turn of the century until now.},
  author       = {Houben, Annemie and Van Hoorick, Jasper and Van Erps, J{\"u}rgen and Thienpont, Hugo and Van Vlierberghe, Sandra and Dubruel, Peter},
  issn         = {0090-6964},
  journal      = {ANNALS OF BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING},
  keyword      = {Indirect 3D printing,Lost-Mould,Indirect Solid Free Form Fabrication,Indirect Rapid Prototyping,Tissue Engineering,SOLID FREEFORM FABRICATION,3-DIMENSIONAL MICROVASCULAR NETWORKS,CALCIUM-PHOSPHATE SCAFFOLDS,MARROW STROMAL CELLS,COMPOSITE SCAFFOLDS,BONE REGENERATION,PORE-SIZE,POLYCAPROLACTONE SCAFFOLDS,HYDROXYAPATITE SCAFFOLDS,INTERNAL ARCHITECTURE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {58--83},
  title        = {Indirect rapid prototyping : opening up unprecedented opportunities in scaffold design and applications},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10439-016-1610-x},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {2017},
}

Chicago
Houben, Annemie, Jasper Van Hoorick, Jürgen Van Erps, Hugo Thienpont, Sandra Van Vlierberghe, and Peter Dubruel. 2017. “Indirect Rapid Prototyping : Opening up Unprecedented Opportunities in Scaffold Design and Applications.” Annals of Biomedical Engineering 45 (1): 58–83.
APA
Houben, A., Van Hoorick, J., Van Erps, J., Thienpont, H., Van Vlierberghe, S., & Dubruel, P. (2017). Indirect rapid prototyping : opening up unprecedented opportunities in scaffold design and applications. ANNALS OF BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, 45(1), 58–83.
Vancouver
1.
Houben A, Van Hoorick J, Van Erps J, Thienpont H, Van Vlierberghe S, Dubruel P. Indirect rapid prototyping : opening up unprecedented opportunities in scaffold design and applications. ANNALS OF BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING. 2017;45(1):58–83.
MLA
Houben, Annemie, Jasper Van Hoorick, Jürgen Van Erps, et al. “Indirect Rapid Prototyping : Opening up Unprecedented Opportunities in Scaffold Design and Applications.” ANNALS OF BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING 45.1 (2017): 58–83. Print.