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Voluntary inhibition of pain avoidance behavior: an fMRI study

Maggie Lynn, Jelle Demanet, Ruth Krebs UGent, Pieter Van Dessel UGent and Marcel Brass UGent (2016) BRAIN STRUCTURE & FUNCTION. 221(3). p.1309-1320
abstract
Behavioral inhibition has classically been considered to rely upon a neural network centered at the right inferior frontal cortex [rIFC; Aron et al. (8:170-177, 2004; 18:177-185, 2014)]. However, the vast majority of inhibition studies have entailed exogenous stop signals instructing participants to withhold responding. More recent work has begun to examine the neural underpinnings of endogenous inhibition, revealing a distinct cortical basis in the dorsal fronto-median cortex [dFMC; Brass and Haggard (27:9141-9145, 2007); Kuhn et al. (30:2834-3843, 2009)]. Yet, contrary to everyday experiences of voluntary behavioral suppression, the paradigms employed to investigate action inhibition have thus far been somewhat artificial, and involve little persuasive motivation to act. Accordingly, the present fMRI study seeks to compare and contrast intentional with instructed inhibition in a novel pain paradigm that recruits 'hot' incentive response systems. Participants received increasing thermal stimulation to their inner wrists, and were required to occasionally withhold their natural impulse to withdraw from the compelling pain sensation at peak temperature, in both instructed and free-choice conditions. Consistent with previous research, we observed inhibition-related activity in the dFMC and the rIFC. However, these regions displayed equivalent activation levels for both inhibition types. These data extend previous research by demonstrating that under ecologically valid conditions with a strong motivation to act, both stopping networks operate in concert to enable suppression of unwanted behavior.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Volition, Effort, Behavioral inhibition, CINGULATE, CONNECTIVITY, STOP, MOTOR AREA, BRAIN RESPONSES, SOCIAL COGNITION, INTENTIONAL INHIBITION, SELF-CONTROL, INFERIOR FRONTAL-CORTEX, RESPONSE-INHIBITION, Self-control, Pain
journal title
BRAIN STRUCTURE & FUNCTION
volume
221
issue
3
pages
1309 - 1320
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000373801400007
JCR category
ANATOMY & MORPHOLOGY
JCR impact factor
4.698 (2016)
JCR rank
1/21 (2016)
JCR quartile
1 (2016)
ISSN
1863-2653
DOI
10.1007/s00429-014-0972-9
project
The integrative neuroscience of behavioral control (Neuroscience)
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
7225315
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-7225315
date created
2016-05-24 15:58:02
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:41:54
@article{7225315,
  abstract     = {Behavioral inhibition has classically been considered to rely upon a neural network centered at the right inferior frontal cortex [rIFC; Aron et al. (8:170-177, 2004; 18:177-185, 2014)]. However, the vast majority of inhibition studies have entailed exogenous stop signals instructing participants to withhold responding. More recent work has begun to examine the neural underpinnings of endogenous inhibition, revealing a distinct cortical basis in the dorsal fronto-median cortex [dFMC; Brass and Haggard (27:9141-9145, 2007); Kuhn et al. (30:2834-3843, 2009)]. Yet, contrary to everyday experiences of voluntary behavioral suppression, the paradigms employed to investigate action inhibition have thus far been somewhat artificial, and involve little persuasive motivation to act. Accordingly, the present fMRI study seeks to compare and contrast intentional with instructed inhibition in a novel pain paradigm that recruits 'hot' incentive response systems. Participants received increasing thermal stimulation to their inner wrists, and were required to occasionally withhold their natural impulse to withdraw from the compelling pain sensation at peak temperature, in both instructed and free-choice conditions. Consistent with previous research, we observed inhibition-related activity in the dFMC and the rIFC. However, these regions displayed equivalent activation levels for both inhibition types. These data extend previous research by demonstrating that under ecologically valid conditions with a strong motivation to act, both stopping networks operate in concert to enable suppression of unwanted behavior.},
  author       = {Lynn, Maggie and Demanet, Jelle and Krebs, Ruth and Van Dessel, Pieter and Brass, Marcel},
  issn         = {1863-2653},
  journal      = {BRAIN STRUCTURE \& FUNCTION},
  keyword      = {Volition,Effort,Behavioral inhibition,CINGULATE,CONNECTIVITY,STOP,MOTOR AREA,BRAIN RESPONSES,SOCIAL COGNITION,INTENTIONAL INHIBITION,SELF-CONTROL,INFERIOR FRONTAL-CORTEX,RESPONSE-INHIBITION,Self-control,Pain},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {1309--1320},
  title        = {Voluntary inhibition of pain avoidance behavior: an fMRI study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00429-014-0972-9},
  volume       = {221},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
Lynn, Maggie, Jelle Demanet, Ruth Krebs, Pieter Van Dessel, and Marcel Brass. 2016. “Voluntary Inhibition of Pain Avoidance Behavior: An fMRI Study.” Brain Structure & Function 221 (3): 1309–1320.
APA
Lynn, M., Demanet, J., Krebs, R., Van Dessel, P., & Brass, M. (2016). Voluntary inhibition of pain avoidance behavior: an fMRI study. BRAIN STRUCTURE & FUNCTION, 221(3), 1309–1320.
Vancouver
1.
Lynn M, Demanet J, Krebs R, Van Dessel P, Brass M. Voluntary inhibition of pain avoidance behavior: an fMRI study. BRAIN STRUCTURE & FUNCTION. 2016;221(3):1309–20.
MLA
Lynn, Maggie, Jelle Demanet, Ruth Krebs, et al. “Voluntary Inhibition of Pain Avoidance Behavior: An fMRI Study.” BRAIN STRUCTURE & FUNCTION 221.3 (2016): 1309–1320. Print.