Advanced search

Potentials and limitations of modeling bite forces: preliminary implications of simplifying real life musculoskeletal systems to simplified 3D and 2D models

Mathias Bouilliart (UGent) , Jens De Meyer (UGent) , Sam Van Wassenbergh (UGent) , Barbara De Kegel (UGent) and Dominique Adriaens (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
In case the bite force of an organism can’t be measured in vivo, it can be estimated mathematically using static-state equilibrium models. However, these models represent different levels of simplifications of the reality. To investigate the impact of such simplifications of the musculoskeletal topography and the parameters describing muscle function, three different models are compared in this study. The first model describes the topography using 3D-coordinates and calculates muscle contraction force by using a series of parameters (including the muscle’s origin and insertion, fiber and tendon lengths and pennation angle). As the lower jaw becomes depressed, this model accounts for changes in muscle physiology parameters according to this movement. The second model uses the same 3D-coordinates, but calculates muscle force based on the physiological cross section area (PCSA) of the muscle. In this model, the muscle force is a theoretical maximal isometric force that remains constant throughout the simulation of different gape angles. The third model projects lever arms and the muscle’s line of action to the midsagittal plane and uses the PCSA (as measured in 3D) to infer muscle force. Input-data for these models is obtained from the European eel (Anguilla anguilla). Several isometric- and allometric-scaled morphs are deduced from a yellow eel specimen and implemented in the models. This poster illustrates the preliminary results of the three models. These results are compared, and validated against in vivo bite force data of yellow eels. Bite force calculations of earlier life stages (leptocephali and glass eels) were also simulated using the same models. These comparisons therefore allow defining constraints on the predictive power of different models generally used to calculate bite forces.

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Bouilliart, Mathias, Jens De Meyer, Sam Van Wassenbergh, Barbara De Kegel, and Dominique Adriaens. 2015. “Potentials and Limitations of Modeling Bite Forces: Preliminary Implications of Simplifying Real Life Musculoskeletal Systems to Simplified 3D and 2D Models.” In Zoology 2015, Abstracts.
APA
Bouilliart, M., De Meyer, J., Van Wassenbergh, S., De Kegel, B., & Adriaens, D. (2015). Potentials and limitations of modeling bite forces: preliminary implications of simplifying real life musculoskeletal systems to simplified 3D and 2D models. Zoology 2015, Abstracts. Presented at the Zoology 2015 (22nd Benelux congress of Zoology).
Vancouver
1.
Bouilliart M, De Meyer J, Van Wassenbergh S, De Kegel B, Adriaens D. Potentials and limitations of modeling bite forces: preliminary implications of simplifying real life musculoskeletal systems to simplified 3D and 2D models. Zoology 2015, Abstracts. 2015.
MLA
Bouilliart, Mathias, Jens De Meyer, Sam Van Wassenbergh, et al. “Potentials and Limitations of Modeling Bite Forces: Preliminary Implications of Simplifying Real Life Musculoskeletal Systems to Simplified 3D and 2D Models.” Zoology 2015, Abstracts. 2015. Print.
@inproceedings{7224520,
  abstract     = {In case the bite force of an organism can{\textquoteright}t be measured in vivo, it can be estimated mathematically using static-state equilibrium models. However, these models represent different levels of simplifications of the reality. To investigate the impact of such simplifications of the musculoskeletal topography and the parameters describing muscle function, three different models are compared in this study. The first model describes the topography using 3D-coordinates and calculates muscle contraction force by using a series of parameters (including the muscle{\textquoteright}s origin and insertion, fiber and tendon lengths and pennation angle). As the lower jaw becomes depressed, this model accounts for changes in muscle physiology parameters according to this movement. The second model uses the same 3D-coordinates, but calculates muscle force based on the physiological cross section area (PCSA) of the muscle. In this model, the muscle force is a theoretical maximal isometric force that remains constant throughout the simulation of different gape angles. The third model projects lever arms and the muscle{\textquoteright}s line of action to the midsagittal plane and uses the PCSA (as measured in 3D) to infer muscle force.
Input-data for these models is obtained from the European eel (Anguilla anguilla). Several isometric- and allometric-scaled morphs are deduced from a yellow eel specimen and implemented in the models. This poster illustrates the preliminary results of the three models. These results are compared, and validated against in vivo bite force data of yellow eels. Bite force calculations of earlier life stages (leptocephali and glass eels) were also simulated using the same models. These comparisons therefore allow defining constraints on the predictive power of different models generally used to calculate bite forces.},
  author       = {Bouilliart, Mathias and De Meyer, Jens and Van Wassenbergh, Sam and De Kegel, Barbara and Adriaens, Dominique},
  booktitle    = {Zoology 2015, Abstracts},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Amsterdam, The Netherlands},
  title        = {Potentials and limitations of modeling bite forces: preliminary implications of simplifying real life musculoskeletal systems to simplified 3D and 2D models},
  year         = {2015},
}