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Where do the cultural differences in dynamics of controlling parenting lie? Adolescents as active agents in the perception of and coping with parental behavior.

Beiwen Chen (UGent) , Bart Soenens (UGent) , Maarten Vansteenkiste (UGent) , Stijn Van Petegem and Wim Beyers (UGent)
(2016) PSYCHOLOGICA BELGICA. 56(3). p.169-192
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Abstract
There is ongoing debate about the universal or culture-specific role of controlling parenting in children's and adolescents' development. This study addressed the possibility of cultural variability in how controlling parenting practices are perceived and dealt with. Specifically, we examined Belgian (N = 341) and Chinese (N = 316) adolescents' perceptions of and reactions towards a vignette depicting parental guilt-induction, relative to generally controlling and autonomy supportive vignettes. Whereas Belgian adolescents perceived guilt-induction to be as controlling as generally controlling parental behavior, Chinese adolescents' perception of guilt-induction as controlling was more moderate. Belgian and Chinese adolescents also showed some similarities and differences in their responses to the feelings of need frustration following from the controlling practices, with compulsive compliance for instance being more common in Chinese adolescents. Discussion focuses on cross-cultural similarities and differences in dynamics of controlling parenting.
Keywords
Parenting, Control, Autonomy-Support, Psychological Control, Guilt-induction, Psychological needs, Coping, Cross-cultural, Self-Determination Theory, SELF-DETERMINATION THEORY, PSYCHOLOGICAL CONTROL, UNITED-STATES, AUTONOMY, CHINESE, PERSPECTIVE, INDUCTION, GUILT, ASSOCIATIONS, RETHINKING

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MLA
Chen, Beiwen, et al. “Where Do the Cultural Differences in Dynamics of Controlling Parenting Lie? Adolescents as Active Agents in the Perception of and Coping with Parental Behavior.” PSYCHOLOGICA BELGICA, vol. 56, no. 3, UBIQUITY PRESS, 2016, pp. 169–92.
APA
Chen, B., Soenens, B., Vansteenkiste, M., Van Petegem, S., & Beyers, W. (2016). Where do the cultural differences in dynamics of controlling parenting lie? Adolescents as active agents in the perception of and coping with parental behavior. PSYCHOLOGICA BELGICA, 56(3), 169–192.
Chicago author-date
Chen, Beiwen, Bart Soenens, Maarten Vansteenkiste, Stijn Van Petegem, and Wim Beyers. 2016. “Where Do the Cultural Differences in Dynamics of Controlling Parenting Lie? Adolescents as Active Agents in the Perception of and Coping with Parental Behavior.” PSYCHOLOGICA BELGICA 56 (3): 169–92.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Chen, Beiwen, Bart Soenens, Maarten Vansteenkiste, Stijn Van Petegem, and Wim Beyers. 2016. “Where Do the Cultural Differences in Dynamics of Controlling Parenting Lie? Adolescents as Active Agents in the Perception of and Coping with Parental Behavior.” PSYCHOLOGICA BELGICA 56 (3): 169–192.
Vancouver
1.
Chen B, Soenens B, Vansteenkiste M, Van Petegem S, Beyers W. Where do the cultural differences in dynamics of controlling parenting lie? Adolescents as active agents in the perception of and coping with parental behavior. PSYCHOLOGICA BELGICA. 2016;56(3):169–92.
IEEE
[1]
B. Chen, B. Soenens, M. Vansteenkiste, S. Van Petegem, and W. Beyers, “Where do the cultural differences in dynamics of controlling parenting lie? Adolescents as active agents in the perception of and coping with parental behavior.,” PSYCHOLOGICA BELGICA, vol. 56, no. 3, pp. 169–192, 2016.
@article{7224256,
  abstract     = {There is ongoing debate about the universal or culture-specific role of controlling parenting in children's and adolescents' development. This study addressed the possibility of cultural variability in how controlling parenting practices are perceived and dealt with. Specifically, we examined Belgian (N = 341) and Chinese (N = 316) adolescents' perceptions of and reactions towards a vignette depicting parental guilt-induction, relative to generally controlling and autonomy supportive vignettes. Whereas Belgian adolescents perceived guilt-induction to be as controlling as generally controlling parental behavior, Chinese adolescents' perception of guilt-induction as controlling was more moderate. Belgian and Chinese adolescents also showed some similarities and differences in their responses to the feelings of need frustration following from the controlling practices, with compulsive compliance for instance being more common in Chinese adolescents. Discussion focuses on cross-cultural similarities and differences in dynamics of controlling parenting.},
  author       = {Chen, Beiwen and Soenens, Bart and Vansteenkiste, Maarten and Van Petegem, Stijn and Beyers, Wim},
  issn         = {0033-2879 },
  journal      = {PSYCHOLOGICA BELGICA},
  keywords     = {Parenting,Control,Autonomy-Support,Psychological Control,Guilt-induction,Psychological needs,Coping,Cross-cultural,Self-Determination Theory,SELF-DETERMINATION THEORY,PSYCHOLOGICAL CONTROL,UNITED-STATES,AUTONOMY,CHINESE,PERSPECTIVE,INDUCTION,GUILT,ASSOCIATIONS,RETHINKING},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {169--192},
  publisher    = {UBIQUITY PRESS},
  title        = {Where do the cultural differences in dynamics of controlling parenting lie? Adolescents as active agents in the perception of and coping with parental behavior.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/pb.306},
  volume       = {56},
  year         = {2016},
}

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