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The rise and fall of nodding syndrome in public discourse: an analysis of newspaper coverage in Uganda

(2016) CRITIQUE OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 36(2). p.168-196
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Abstract
Nodding syndrome is an unexplained affliction that has affected thousands of children in post-conflict northern Uganda, South Sudan and in Tanzania. This study focuses on the sudden rise of nodding syndrome in the Ugandan public discourse, based on 369 newspaper reports over a timespan of 4.5 years and interviews with journalists, politicians, caretakers and health workers during 15 months of fieldwork in Kitgum district. The news coverage of nodding syndrome follows a non-linear trajectory, increasing at the end of 2011 and declining a year later. Attention is paid to the conceptualization of nodding syndrome in media reports, linked to the formation of public opinion and management of the affliction. Different settings elicit different concepts and it is therefore necessary to contextualize illness and focus on processes of formation.
Keywords
conflict, politics, conceptualization, content analysis, media discourse, Uganda, nodding syndrome, illness, Acholi, CASE SERIES, MEDIA, ILLNESS

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MLA
van Bemmel, Karin. “The Rise and Fall of Nodding Syndrome in Public Discourse: An Analysis of Newspaper Coverage in Uganda.” Ed. John Gledhill & Stephen Nugent. CRITIQUE OF ANTHROPOLOGY 36.2 (2016): 168–196. Print.
APA
van Bemmel, K. (2016). The rise and fall of nodding syndrome in public discourse: an analysis of newspaper coverage in Uganda. (J. Gledhill & S. Nugent, Eds.)CRITIQUE OF ANTHROPOLOGY, 36(2), 168–196.
Chicago author-date
van Bemmel, Karin. 2016. “The Rise and Fall of Nodding Syndrome in Public Discourse: An Analysis of Newspaper Coverage in Uganda.” Ed. John Gledhill and Stephen Nugent. Critique of Anthropology 36 (2): 168–196.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
van Bemmel, Karin. 2016. “The Rise and Fall of Nodding Syndrome in Public Discourse: An Analysis of Newspaper Coverage in Uganda.” Ed. John Gledhill and Stephen Nugent. Critique of Anthropology 36 (2): 168–196.
Vancouver
1.
van Bemmel K. The rise and fall of nodding syndrome in public discourse: an analysis of newspaper coverage in Uganda. Gledhill J, Nugent S, editors. CRITIQUE OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 2016;36(2):168–96.
IEEE
[1]
K. van Bemmel, “The rise and fall of nodding syndrome in public discourse: an analysis of newspaper coverage in Uganda,” CRITIQUE OF ANTHROPOLOGY, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 168–196, 2016.
@article{7222782,
  abstract     = {Nodding syndrome is an unexplained affliction that has affected thousands of children in post-conflict northern Uganda, South Sudan and in Tanzania. This study focuses on the sudden rise of nodding syndrome in the Ugandan public discourse, based on 369 newspaper reports over a timespan of 4.5 years and interviews with journalists, politicians, caretakers and health workers during 15 months of fieldwork in Kitgum district. The news coverage of nodding syndrome follows a non-linear trajectory, increasing at the end of 2011 and declining a year later. Attention is paid to the conceptualization of nodding syndrome in media reports, linked to the formation of public opinion and management of the affliction. Different settings elicit different concepts and it is therefore necessary to contextualize illness and focus on processes of formation.},
  author       = {van Bemmel, Karin},
  editor       = {Gledhill, John and Nugent, Stephen},
  issn         = {0308-275X},
  journal      = {CRITIQUE OF ANTHROPOLOGY},
  keywords     = {conflict,politics,conceptualization,content analysis,media discourse,Uganda,nodding syndrome,illness,Acholi,CASE SERIES,MEDIA,ILLNESS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {168--196},
  title        = {The rise and fall of nodding syndrome in public discourse: an analysis of newspaper coverage in Uganda},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0308275X15614635},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2016},
}

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