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Calcium spiking patterns and the role of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase CCaMK in lateral root base nodulation of Sesbania rostrata

(2009) PLANT CELL. 21(5). p.1526-1540
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Abstract
Nodulation factor (NF) signal transduction in the legume-rhizobium symbiosis involves calcium oscillations that are instrumental in eliciting nodulation. To date, Ca2+ spiking has been studied exclusively in the intracellular bacterial invasion of growing root hairs in zone I. This mechanism is not the only one by which rhizobia gain entry into their hosts; the tropical legume Sesbania rostrata can be invaded intercellularly by rhizobia at cracks caused by lateral root emergence, and this process is associated with cell death for formation of infection pockets. We show that epidermal cells at lateral root bases respond to NFs with Ca2+ oscillations that are faster and more symmetrical than those observed during root hair invasion. Enhanced jasmonic acid or reduced ethylene levels slowed down the Ca2+ spiking frequency and stimulated intracellular root hair invasion by rhizobia, but prevented nodule formation. Hence, intracellular invasion in root hairs is linked with a very specific Ca2+ signature. In parallel experiments, we found that knockdown of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase gene of S. rostrata abolished nodule development but not the formation of infection pockets by intercellular invasion at lateral root bases, suggesting that the colonization of the outer cortex is independent of Ca2+ spiking decoding.
Keywords
INTERCELLULAR INVASION, LOTUS-JAPONICUS, RECEPTOR KINASE, AZORHIZOBIUM-CAULINODANS, MEDICAGO-TRUNCATULA, PROTEIN-KINASE, FUNGAL SYMBIOSIS, FACTOR SIGNAL-TRANSDUCTION, HAIR DEFORMATION, SYMBIOTIC NODULE DEVELOPMENT

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Chicago
Capoen, Ward, Jeroen Den Herder, Jongho Sun, Christa Verplancke, Annick De Keyser, Riet De Rycke, Sofie Goormachtig, Giles Oldroyd, and Marcella Holsters. 2009. “Calcium Spiking Patterns and the Role of the Calcium/calmodulin-dependent Kinase CCaMK in Lateral Root Base Nodulation of Sesbania Rostrata.” Plant Cell 21 (5): 1526–1540.
APA
Capoen, W., Den Herder, J., Sun, J., Verplancke, C., De Keyser, A., De Rycke, R., Goormachtig, S., et al. (2009). Calcium spiking patterns and the role of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase CCaMK in lateral root base nodulation of Sesbania rostrata. PLANT CELL, 21(5), 1526–1540.
Vancouver
1.
Capoen W, Den Herder J, Sun J, Verplancke C, De Keyser A, De Rycke R, et al. Calcium spiking patterns and the role of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase CCaMK in lateral root base nodulation of Sesbania rostrata. PLANT CELL. 2009;21(5):1526–40.
MLA
Capoen, Ward, Jeroen Den Herder, Jongho Sun, et al. “Calcium Spiking Patterns and the Role of the Calcium/calmodulin-dependent Kinase CCaMK in Lateral Root Base Nodulation of Sesbania Rostrata.” PLANT CELL 21.5 (2009): 1526–1540. Print.
@article{721887,
  abstract     = {Nodulation factor (NF) signal transduction in the legume-rhizobium symbiosis involves calcium oscillations that are instrumental in eliciting nodulation. To date, Ca2+ spiking has been studied exclusively in the intracellular bacterial invasion of growing root hairs in zone I. This mechanism is not the only one by which rhizobia gain entry into their hosts; the tropical legume Sesbania rostrata can be invaded intercellularly by rhizobia at cracks caused by lateral root emergence, and this process is associated with cell death for formation of infection pockets. We show that epidermal cells at lateral root bases respond to NFs with Ca2+ oscillations that are faster and more symmetrical than those observed during root hair invasion. Enhanced jasmonic acid or reduced ethylene levels slowed down the Ca2+ spiking frequency and stimulated intracellular root hair invasion by rhizobia, but prevented nodule formation. Hence, intracellular invasion in root hairs is linked with a very specific Ca2+ signature. In parallel experiments, we found that knockdown of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase gene of S. rostrata abolished nodule development but not the formation of infection pockets by intercellular invasion at lateral root bases, suggesting that the colonization of the outer cortex is independent of Ca2+ spiking decoding.},
  author       = {Capoen, Ward and Den Herder, Jeroen and Sun, Jongho and Verplancke, Christa and De Keyser, Annick and De Rycke, Riet and Goormachtig, Sofie and Oldroyd, Giles and Holsters, Marcella},
  issn         = {1040-4651},
  journal      = {PLANT CELL},
  keyword      = {INTERCELLULAR INVASION,LOTUS-JAPONICUS,RECEPTOR KINASE,AZORHIZOBIUM-CAULINODANS,MEDICAGO-TRUNCATULA,PROTEIN-KINASE,FUNGAL SYMBIOSIS,FACTOR SIGNAL-TRANSDUCTION,HAIR DEFORMATION,SYMBIOTIC NODULE DEVELOPMENT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1526--1540},
  title        = {Calcium spiking patterns and the role of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase CCaMK in lateral root base nodulation of Sesbania rostrata},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1105/tpc.109.066233},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2009},
}

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