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Quality of life in relation to future mental health problems and offending: testing the good lives model among detained girls

(2016) LAW AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR. 40(3). p.285-294
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Abstract
Detained girls bear high levels of criminal behavior and mental health problems that are likely to persist into young adulthood. Research with these girls began primarily from a risk management perspective, whereas a strength-based empowering perspective may increase knowledge that could improve rehabilitation. This study examines detained girls' quality of life (QoL) in relation to future mental health problems and offending, thereby testing the strength-based good lives model of offender rehabilitation (GLM). At baseline, 95 girls (M-age = 16.25) completed the World Health Organization QoL instrument to assess their QoL prior to detention in the domains of physical health, psychological health, social relationships, and environment. Six months after discharge, mental health problems and offending were assessed by self-report measures. Structural equation models were conducted to test GLM's proposed (in) direct pathways from QoL (via mental health problems) toward offending. Although we could not find support for GLM's direct negative pathway from QoL to offending, our findings did provide support for GLM's indirect negative pathway via mental health problems to future offending. In addition, we found a direct positive pathway from detained girls' satisfaction with their social relationships to offending after discharge. The current findings support the potential relevance of addressing detained girls' QoL, pursuing the development of new skills, and supporting them to build constructive social contacts. Our findings, however, also show that clinicians should not only focus on strengths but that detecting and modifying mental health problems in this vulnerable group is also warranted.
Keywords
GENDER-DIFFERENCES, SEXUAL OFFENDERS, JUVENILE DETENTION, ADOLESCENT FEMALES, PSYCHIATRIC-DISORDERS, CHILD MOLESTERS, YOUNG ADULTHOOD, FIT INDEXES, SELF-ESTEEM, WHOQOL-BREF, good lives model, psychopathology, young offenders, female adolescents, follow-up studies

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Van Damme, Lore, Machteld Hoeve, Robert Vermeiren, Wouter Vanderplasschen, and Olivier Colins. 2016. “Quality of Life in Relation to Future Mental Health Problems and Offending: Testing the Good Lives Model Among Detained Girls.” Law and Human Behavior 40 (3): 285–294.
APA
Van Damme, Lore, Hoeve, M., Vermeiren, R., Vanderplasschen, W., & Colins, O. (2016). Quality of life in relation to future mental health problems and offending: testing the good lives model among detained girls. LAW AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR, 40(3), 285–294.
Vancouver
1.
Van Damme L, Hoeve M, Vermeiren R, Vanderplasschen W, Colins O. Quality of life in relation to future mental health problems and offending: testing the good lives model among detained girls. LAW AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR. 2016;40(3):285–94.
MLA
Van Damme, Lore, Machteld Hoeve, Robert Vermeiren, et al. “Quality of Life in Relation to Future Mental Health Problems and Offending: Testing the Good Lives Model Among Detained Girls.” LAW AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR 40.3 (2016): 285–294. Print.
@article{7213987,
  abstract     = {Detained girls bear high levels of criminal behavior and mental health problems that are likely to persist into young adulthood. Research with these girls began primarily from a risk management perspective, whereas a strength-based empowering perspective may increase knowledge that could improve rehabilitation. This study examines detained girls' quality of life (QoL) in relation to future mental health problems and offending, thereby testing the strength-based good lives model of offender rehabilitation (GLM). At baseline, 95 girls (M-age = 16.25) completed the World Health Organization QoL instrument to assess their QoL prior to detention in the domains of physical health, psychological health, social relationships, and environment. Six months after discharge, mental health problems and offending were assessed by self-report measures. Structural equation models were conducted to test GLM's proposed (in) direct pathways from QoL (via mental health problems) toward offending. Although we could not find support for GLM's direct negative pathway from QoL to offending, our findings did provide support for GLM's indirect negative pathway via mental health problems to future offending. In addition, we found a direct positive pathway from detained girls' satisfaction with their social relationships to offending after discharge. The current findings support the potential relevance of addressing detained girls' QoL, pursuing the development of new skills, and supporting them to build constructive social contacts. Our findings, however, also show that clinicians should not only focus on strengths but that detecting and modifying mental health problems in this vulnerable group is also warranted.},
  author       = {Van Damme, Lore and Hoeve, Machteld and Vermeiren, Robert and Vanderplasschen, Wouter and Colins, Olivier},
  issn         = {0147-7307},
  journal      = {LAW AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR},
  keyword      = {GENDER-DIFFERENCES,SEXUAL OFFENDERS,JUVENILE DETENTION,ADOLESCENT FEMALES,PSYCHIATRIC-DISORDERS,CHILD MOLESTERS,YOUNG ADULTHOOD,FIT INDEXES,SELF-ESTEEM,WHOQOL-BREF,good lives model,psychopathology,young offenders,female adolescents,follow-up studies},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {285--294},
  title        = {Quality of life in relation to future mental health problems and offending: testing the good lives model among detained girls},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/lhb0000177},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2016},
}

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