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The role of institutional dual embeddedness in the strategic local adaptation of international branch campuses: evidence from Malaysia and Singapore

(2016) STUDIES IN HIGHER EDUCATION. 41(6). p.955-970
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Abstract
Past research revealed that International Branch Campuses (IBCs) are simultaneously under two types of isomorphic pressures. On the one hand, they are obliged to conform to the institutions of their host countries, which lead them towards homogenising with the local Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), hence deviate from their parent unit's model. On the other hand, they are required to maintain their parent unit's identity across borders. By adapting to the local context, IBCs gain legitimacy in their local milieus and thus reduce tensions with local stakeholders. By maintaining similarity with their parents, they differentiate from the local competitors and therefore better compete in the market place. This paper addresses the duality (between adherence to the parent's and local expectations) by studying six important Australian and British IBCs in two major higher education (HE) hubs in South East Asia. We identify the determinants of the IBCs' strategic choices and their responses to institutional pressures. The analysis suggests that IBCs have maintained a high level of similarity with their parent units in terms of curriculum, but not so much in terms of staffing. We argue that staffing will continue to be the biggest strategic challenge faced by IBCs.
Keywords
OFFSHORE CAMPUS, HIGHER-EDUCATION, SUBSIDIARIES, SERVICE, GOVERNANCE, UNIVERSITY, POLICY, FIRMS, WORK, international branch campus, strategic management, institutional pressure, adaptation, strategy and transnational education

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MLA
Shams, Farshid, and Jeroen Huisman. “The Role of Institutional Dual Embeddedness in the Strategic Local Adaptation of International Branch Campuses: Evidence from Malaysia and Singapore.” STUDIES IN HIGHER EDUCATION 41.6 (2016): 955–970. Print.
APA
Shams, F., & Huisman, J. (2016). The role of institutional dual embeddedness in the strategic local adaptation of international branch campuses: evidence from Malaysia and Singapore. STUDIES IN HIGHER EDUCATION, 41(6), 955–970.
Chicago author-date
Shams, Farshid, and Jeroen Huisman. 2016. “The Role of Institutional Dual Embeddedness in the Strategic Local Adaptation of International Branch Campuses: Evidence from Malaysia and Singapore.” Studies in Higher Education 41 (6): 955–970.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Shams, Farshid, and Jeroen Huisman. 2016. “The Role of Institutional Dual Embeddedness in the Strategic Local Adaptation of International Branch Campuses: Evidence from Malaysia and Singapore.” Studies in Higher Education 41 (6): 955–970.
Vancouver
1.
Shams F, Huisman J. The role of institutional dual embeddedness in the strategic local adaptation of international branch campuses: evidence from Malaysia and Singapore. STUDIES IN HIGHER EDUCATION. 2016;41(6):955–70.
IEEE
[1]
F. Shams and J. Huisman, “The role of institutional dual embeddedness in the strategic local adaptation of international branch campuses: evidence from Malaysia and Singapore,” STUDIES IN HIGHER EDUCATION, vol. 41, no. 6, pp. 955–970, 2016.
@article{7205032,
  abstract     = {Past research revealed that International Branch Campuses (IBCs) are simultaneously under two types of isomorphic pressures. On the one hand, they are obliged to conform to the institutions of their host countries, which lead them towards homogenising with the local Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), hence deviate from their parent unit's model. On the other hand, they are required to maintain their parent unit's identity across borders. By adapting to the local context, IBCs gain legitimacy in their local milieus and thus reduce tensions with local stakeholders. By maintaining similarity with their parents, they differentiate from the local competitors and therefore better compete in the market place. This paper addresses the duality (between adherence to the parent's and local expectations) by studying six important Australian and British IBCs in two major higher education (HE) hubs in South East Asia. We identify the determinants of the IBCs' strategic choices and their responses to institutional pressures. The analysis suggests that IBCs have maintained a high level of similarity with their parent units in terms of curriculum, but not so much in terms of staffing. We argue that staffing will continue to be the biggest strategic challenge faced by IBCs.},
  author       = {Shams, Farshid and Huisman, Jeroen},
  issn         = {0307-5079},
  journal      = {STUDIES IN HIGHER EDUCATION},
  keywords     = {OFFSHORE CAMPUS,HIGHER-EDUCATION,SUBSIDIARIES,SERVICE,GOVERNANCE,UNIVERSITY,POLICY,FIRMS,WORK,international branch campus,strategic management,institutional pressure,adaptation,strategy and transnational education},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {955--970},
  title        = {The role of institutional dual embeddedness in the strategic local adaptation of international branch campuses: evidence from Malaysia and Singapore},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2014.966669},
  volume       = {41},
  year         = {2016},
}

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