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Mitogenomics reveals high synteny and long evolutionary histories of sympatric cryptic nematode species

Tara Grosemans UGent, Krystalynne Morris, W Kelley Thomas, Annelien Rigaux UGent, Tom Moens UGent and Sofie Derycke UGent (2016) ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION. 6(6). p.1854-1870
abstract
Species with seemingly identical morphology but with distinct genetic differences are abundant in the marine environment and frequently co-occur in the same habitat. Such cryptic species are typically delineated using a limited number of mitochondrial and/or nuclear marker genes, which do not yield information on gene order and gene content of the genomes under consideration. We used next-generation sequencing to study the composition of the mitochondrial genomes of four sympatrically distributed cryptic species of the Litoditis marina species complex (PmI, PmII, PmIII, and PmIV). The ecology, biology, and natural occurrence of these four species are well known, but the evolutionary processes behind this cryptic speciation remain largely unknown. The gene order of the mitochondrial genomes of the four species was conserved, but differences in genome length, gene length, and codon usage were observed. The atp8 gene was lacking in all four species. Phylogenetic analyses confirm that PmI and PmIV are sister species and that PmIII diverged earliest. The most recent common ancestor of the four cryptic species was estimated to have diverged 16 MYA. Synonymous mutations outnumbered nonsynonymous changes in all protein-encoding genes, with the Complex IV genes (coxI-III) experiencing the strongest purifying selection. Our mitogenomic results show that morphologically similar species can have long evolutionary histories and that PmIII has several differences in genetic makeup compared to the three other species, which may explain why it is better adapted to higher temperatures than the other species.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Adaptation, cryptic speciation, Litoditis marina, Wolbachia, Miocene, POPULATION GENETIC-STRUCTURE, TRANSFER-RNA GENES, MITOCHONDRIAL GENOME, PELLIODITIS-MARINA, CAENORHABDITIS-BRIGGSAE, GLOBODERA-PALLIDA, DNA, DIVERSITY, SPECIATION, ELEGANS
journal title
ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION
Evol. Ecol.
volume
6
issue
6
pages
1854 - 1870
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000372488300024
JCR category
ECOLOGY
JCR impact factor
2.44 (2016)
JCR rank
57/153 (2016)
JCR quartile
2 (2016)
ISSN
2045-7758
DOI
10.1002/ece3.1975
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
7177654
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-7177654
date created
2016-04-07 11:21:57
date last changed
2017-06-15 08:38:23
@article{7177654,
  abstract     = {Species with seemingly identical morphology but with distinct genetic differences are abundant in the marine environment and frequently co-occur in the same habitat. Such cryptic species are typically delineated using a limited number of mitochondrial and/or nuclear marker genes, which do not yield information on gene order and gene content of the genomes under consideration. We used next-generation sequencing to study the composition of the mitochondrial genomes of four sympatrically distributed cryptic species of the Litoditis marina species complex (PmI, PmII, PmIII, and PmIV). The ecology, biology, and natural occurrence of these four species are well known, but the evolutionary processes behind this cryptic speciation remain largely unknown. The gene order of the mitochondrial genomes of the four species was conserved, but differences in genome length, gene length, and codon usage were observed. The atp8 gene was lacking in all four species. Phylogenetic analyses confirm that PmI and PmIV are sister species and that PmIII diverged earliest. The most recent common ancestor of the four cryptic species was estimated to have diverged 16 MYA. Synonymous mutations outnumbered nonsynonymous changes in all protein-encoding genes, with the Complex IV genes (coxI-III) experiencing the strongest purifying selection. Our mitogenomic results show that morphologically similar species can have long evolutionary histories and that PmIII has several differences in genetic makeup compared to the three other species, which may explain why it is better adapted to higher temperatures than the other species.},
  author       = {Grosemans, Tara and Morris, Krystalynne and Thomas, W Kelley and Rigaux, Annelien and Moens, Tom and Derycke, Sofie},
  issn         = {2045-7758},
  journal      = {ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION},
  keyword      = {Adaptation,cryptic speciation,Litoditis marina,Wolbachia,Miocene,POPULATION GENETIC-STRUCTURE,TRANSFER-RNA GENES,MITOCHONDRIAL GENOME,PELLIODITIS-MARINA,CAENORHABDITIS-BRIGGSAE,GLOBODERA-PALLIDA,DNA,DIVERSITY,SPECIATION,ELEGANS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1854--1870},
  title        = {Mitogenomics reveals high synteny and long evolutionary histories of sympatric cryptic nematode species},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.1975},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
Grosemans, Tara, Krystalynne Morris, W Kelley Thomas, Annelien Rigaux, Tom Moens, and Sofie Derycke. 2016. “Mitogenomics Reveals High Synteny and Long Evolutionary Histories of Sympatric Cryptic Nematode Species.” Ecology and Evolution 6 (6): 1854–1870.
APA
Grosemans, T., Morris, K., Thomas, W. K., Rigaux, A., Moens, T., & Derycke, S. (2016). Mitogenomics reveals high synteny and long evolutionary histories of sympatric cryptic nematode species. ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION, 6(6), 1854–1870.
Vancouver
1.
Grosemans T, Morris K, Thomas WK, Rigaux A, Moens T, Derycke S. Mitogenomics reveals high synteny and long evolutionary histories of sympatric cryptic nematode species. ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION. 2016;6(6):1854–70.
MLA
Grosemans, Tara, Krystalynne Morris, W Kelley Thomas, et al. “Mitogenomics Reveals High Synteny and Long Evolutionary Histories of Sympatric Cryptic Nematode Species.” ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION 6.6 (2016): 1854–1870. Print.