Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Relative contributions of pigments and biophotonic nanostructures to natural color production : a case study in budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) feathers

Liliana D'Alba, Leah Kieffer and Matthew Shawkey UGent (2012) JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY. 215(8). p.1272-1277
abstract
Understanding the mechanistic bases of natural color diversity can provide insight into its evolution and inspiration for biomimetic optical structures. Metazoans can be colored by absorption of light from pigments or by scattering of light from biophotonic nanostructures, and these mechanisms have largely been treated as distinct. However, the interactions between them have rarely been examined. Captive breeding of budgerigars (Aves, Psittacidae, Melopsittacus undulatus) has produced a wide variety of color morphs spanning the majority of the spectrum visible to birds, including the ultraviolet, and thus they have been used as examples of hypothesized structure-pigment interactions. However, empirical data testing these interactions in this excellent model system are lacking. Here we used ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, light and electron microscopy, pigment extraction experiments and optical modeling to examine the physical bases of color production in seven budgerigar morphs, including grey and chromatic (purple to yellow) colors. Feathers from all morphs contained quasi-ordered air-keratin. spongy layer' matrices, but these were highly reduced and irregular in grey and yellow feathers. Similarly, all feathers but yellow and grey had a layer of melanin-containing melanosomes basal to the spongy layer. The presence of melanosomes likely increases color saturation produced by spongy layers whereas their absence may allow increased expression of yellow colors. Finally, extraction of yellow pigments caused some degree of color change in all feathers except purple and grey, suggesting that their presence and contribution to color production is more widespread than previously thought. These data illustrate how interactions between structures and pigments can increase the range of colors attainable in birds and potentially in synthetic systems.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
structural color, psittacofulvin, COHERENT-LIGHT SCATTERING, FOURIER-ANALYSIS, PLUMAGE COLOR, BARBS, KERATIN, YELLOW
journal title
JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY
J. Exp. Biol.
volume
215
issue
8
pages
1272 - 1277
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000302117300008
JCR category
BIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
3.236 (2012)
JCR rank
14/83 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
0022-0949
DOI
10.1242/jeb.064907
language
English
UGent publication?
no
classification
A1
id
7176626
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-7176626
date created
2016-04-06 13:58:47
date last changed
2017-11-23 09:48:25
@article{7176626,
  abstract     = {Understanding the mechanistic bases of natural color diversity can provide insight into its evolution and inspiration for biomimetic optical structures. Metazoans can be colored by absorption of light from pigments or by scattering of light from biophotonic nanostructures, and these mechanisms have largely been treated as distinct. However, the interactions between them have rarely been examined. Captive breeding of budgerigars (Aves, Psittacidae, Melopsittacus undulatus) has produced a wide variety of color morphs spanning the majority of the spectrum visible to birds, including the ultraviolet, and thus they have been used as examples of hypothesized structure-pigment interactions. However, empirical data testing these interactions in this excellent model system are lacking. Here we used ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, light and electron microscopy, pigment extraction experiments and optical modeling to examine the physical bases of color production in seven budgerigar morphs, including grey and chromatic (purple to yellow) colors. Feathers from all morphs contained quasi-ordered air-keratin. spongy layer' matrices, but these were highly reduced and irregular in grey and yellow feathers. Similarly, all feathers but yellow and grey had a layer of melanin-containing melanosomes basal to the spongy layer. The presence of melanosomes likely increases color saturation produced by spongy layers whereas their absence may allow increased expression of yellow colors. Finally, extraction of yellow pigments caused some degree of color change in all feathers except purple and grey, suggesting that their presence and contribution to color production is more widespread than previously thought. These data illustrate how interactions between structures and pigments can increase the range of colors attainable in birds and potentially in synthetic systems.},
  author       = {D'Alba, Liliana and Kieffer, Leah and Shawkey, Matthew},
  issn         = {0022-0949},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {structural color,psittacofulvin,COHERENT-LIGHT SCATTERING,FOURIER-ANALYSIS,PLUMAGE COLOR,BARBS,KERATIN,YELLOW},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1272--1277},
  title        = {Relative contributions of pigments and biophotonic nanostructures to natural color production : a case study in budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) feathers},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jeb.064907},
  volume       = {215},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
D’Alba, Liliana, Leah Kieffer, and Matthew Shawkey. 2012. “Relative Contributions of Pigments and Biophotonic Nanostructures to Natural Color Production : a Case Study in Budgerigar (Melopsittacus Undulatus) Feathers.” Journal of Experimental Biology 215 (8): 1272–1277.
APA
D’Alba, L., Kieffer, L., & Shawkey, M. (2012). Relative contributions of pigments and biophotonic nanostructures to natural color production : a case study in budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) feathers. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY, 215(8), 1272–1277.
Vancouver
1.
D’Alba L, Kieffer L, Shawkey M. Relative contributions of pigments and biophotonic nanostructures to natural color production : a case study in budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) feathers. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY. 2012;215(8):1272–7.
MLA
D’Alba, Liliana, Leah Kieffer, and Matthew Shawkey. “Relative Contributions of Pigments and Biophotonic Nanostructures to Natural Color Production : a Case Study in Budgerigar (Melopsittacus Undulatus) Feathers.” JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY 215.8 (2012): 1272–1277. Print.