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Sub-millimetre DOI detector based on monolithic LYSO and digital SiPM for a dedicated small-animal PET system

Radoslaw Marcinkowski UGent, Pieter Mollet UGent, Roel Van Holen UGent and Stefaan Vandenberghe UGent (2016) PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY. 61(5). p.2196-2212
abstract
The mouse model is widely used in a vast range of biomedical and preclinical studies. Thanks to the ability to detect and quantify biological processes at the molecular level in vivo, PET has become a well-established tool in these investigations. However, the need to visualize and quantify radiopharmaceuticals in anatomic structures of millimetre or less requires good spatial resolution and sensitivity from small-animal PET imaging systems. In previous work we have presented a proof-of-concept of a dedicated high- resolution small-animal PET scanner based on thin monolithic scintillator crystals and Digital Photon Counter photosensor. The combination of thin monolithic crystals and MLE positioning algorithm resulted in an excellent spatial resolution of 0.7mm uniform in the entire field of view (FOV). However, the limitation of the scanner was its low sensitivity due to small hickness of the LYSO crystals (2 mm). Here we present an improved detector design for a small-animal PET system that simultaneously achieves higher sensitivity and sustains a sub- millimetre spatial resolution. The proposed detector consists of a 5 mm thick monolithic LYSO crystal optically coupled to a Digital Photon Counter. Mean nearest neighbour (MNN) positioning combined with depth of interaction (DOI) decoding was employed to achieve sub-millimetre spatial resolution. To evaluate detector performance the intrinsic spatial resolution, energy resolution and coincidence resolving time (CRT) were measured. The average intrinsic spatial resolution of the detector was 0.60mm full-width-at-half- maximum (FWHM). A DOI resolution of 1.66 mm was achieved. The energy resolution was 23% FWHM at 511 keV and CRT of 529ps were measured. The improved detector design overcomes the sensitivity limitation of the previous design by increasing the nominal sensitivity of the detector block and retains an excellent intrinsic spatial resolution.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
preclinical, monolithic scintillators, small-animal, PET, digital silicon photomultiplier
journal title
PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY
Phys. Med. Biol.
volume
61
issue
5
pages
2196 - 2212
publisher
IOP Publishing | Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000391789200004
JCR category
RADIOLOGY, NUCLEAR MEDICINE & MEDICAL IMAGING
JCR impact factor
2.742 (2016)
JCR rank
34/126 (2016)
JCR quartile
2 (2016)
ISSN
0031-9155
DOI
10.1088/0031-9155/61/5/2196
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
7175981
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-7175981
alternative location
http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0031-9155/61/5/2196/meta
date created
2016-04-06 10:04:21
date last changed
2017-12-18 08:05:45
@article{7175981,
  abstract     = {The mouse model is widely used in a vast range of biomedical and preclinical studies. Thanks to the ability to detect and quantify biological processes at the molecular level in vivo, PET has become a well-established tool in these investigations. However, the need to visualize and quantify radiopharmaceuticals in anatomic structures of millimetre or less requires good spatial resolution and sensitivity from small-animal PET imaging systems. In previous work we have presented a proof-of-concept of a dedicated high- resolution small-animal PET scanner based on thin monolithic scintillator crystals and Digital Photon Counter photosensor. The combination of thin monolithic crystals and MLE positioning algorithm resulted in an excellent spatial resolution of 0.7mm uniform in the entire field of view (FOV). However, the limitation of the scanner was its low sensitivity due to small hickness of the LYSO crystals (2 mm). Here we present an improved detector design for a small-animal PET system that simultaneously achieves higher sensitivity and sustains a sub- millimetre spatial resolution. The proposed detector consists of a 5 mm thick monolithic LYSO crystal optically coupled to a Digital Photon Counter. Mean nearest neighbour (MNN) positioning combined with depth of interaction (DOI) decoding was employed to achieve sub-millimetre spatial resolution. To evaluate detector performance the intrinsic spatial resolution, energy resolution and coincidence resolving time (CRT) were measured. The average intrinsic spatial resolution of the detector was 0.60mm full-width-at-half- maximum (FWHM). A DOI resolution of 1.66 mm was achieved. The energy resolution was 23\% FWHM at 511 keV and CRT of 529ps were measured. The improved detector design overcomes the sensitivity limitation of the previous design by increasing the nominal sensitivity of the detector block and retains an excellent intrinsic spatial resolution.},
  author       = {Marcinkowski, Radoslaw and Mollet, Pieter and Van Holen, Roel and Vandenberghe, Stefaan},
  issn         = {0031-9155},
  journal      = {PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {preclinical,monolithic scintillators,small-animal,PET,digital silicon photomultiplier},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {2196--2212},
  publisher    = {IOP Publishing | Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine},
  title        = {Sub-millimetre DOI detector based on monolithic LYSO and digital SiPM for a dedicated small-animal PET system},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/61/5/2196},
  volume       = {61},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
Marcinkowski, Radoslaw, Pieter Mollet, Roel Van Holen, and Stefaan Vandenberghe. 2016. “Sub-millimetre DOI Detector Based on Monolithic LYSO and Digital SiPM for a Dedicated Small-animal PET System.” Physics in Medicine and Biology 61 (5): 2196–2212.
APA
Marcinkowski, R., Mollet, P., Van Holen, R., & Vandenberghe, S. (2016). Sub-millimetre DOI detector based on monolithic LYSO and digital SiPM for a dedicated small-animal PET system. PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY, 61(5), 2196–2212.
Vancouver
1.
Marcinkowski R, Mollet P, Van Holen R, Vandenberghe S. Sub-millimetre DOI detector based on monolithic LYSO and digital SiPM for a dedicated small-animal PET system. PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY. IOP Publishing | Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine; 2016;61(5):2196–212.
MLA
Marcinkowski, Radoslaw, Pieter Mollet, Roel Van Holen, et al. “Sub-millimetre DOI Detector Based on Monolithic LYSO and Digital SiPM for a Dedicated Small-animal PET System.” PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY 61.5 (2016): 2196–2212. Print.