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Dutch and German noun-noun compounds in translation

(2016) LEBENDE SPRACHEN. 61(1). p.117-147
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Abstract
Although nominal compounding is a very productive word formation category in Dutch and German, it is often claimed that it is realized differently in these closely related languages: Where German prefers a compound, Dutch may opt for an alternative construction. The present article explores the differences in nominal compounding by analysing a bidirectional translation corpus. A quantitative analysis confirms that German is more compound-productive than Dutch. Furthermore, patterns are identified to illustrate that different preferences in the rendering of semantic content can lead to Dutch phrases where German uses a compound.
Keywords
translation, noun-noun compounds, corpus-based research, semantic relations

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
De Metsenaere, Hinde, Sonia Vandepitte, and Marc Van de Velde. 2016. “Dutch and German Noun-noun Compounds in Translation.” Ed. Peter A. Schmitt and Reinhold Werner. Lebende Sprachen 61 (1): 117–147.
APA
De Metsenaere, H., Vandepitte, S., & Van de Velde, M. (2016). Dutch and German noun-noun compounds in translation. (Peter A. Schmitt & R. Werner, Eds.)LEBENDE SPRACHEN, 61(1), 117–147.
Vancouver
1.
De Metsenaere H, Vandepitte S, Van de Velde M. Dutch and German noun-noun compounds in translation. Schmitt PA, Werner R, editors. LEBENDE SPRACHEN. De Gruyter Mouton; 2016;61(1):117–47.
MLA
De Metsenaere, Hinde, Sonia Vandepitte, and Marc Van de Velde. “Dutch and German Noun-noun Compounds in Translation.” Ed. Peter A. Schmitt & Reinhold Werner. LEBENDE SPRACHEN 61.1 (2016): 117–147. Print.
@article{7173558,
  abstract     = {Although nominal compounding is a very productive word formation category in Dutch and German, it is often claimed that it is realized differently in these closely related languages: Where German prefers a compound, Dutch may opt for an alternative construction. The present article explores the differences in nominal compounding by analysing a bidirectional translation corpus. A quantitative analysis confirms that German is more compound-productive than Dutch. Furthermore, patterns are identified to illustrate that different preferences in the rendering of semantic content can lead to Dutch phrases where German uses a compound.},
  author       = {De Metsenaere, Hinde and Vandepitte, Sonia and Van de Velde, Marc},
  editor       = {Schmitt, Peter A. and Werner, Reinhold},
  issn         = {0023-9909},
  journal      = {LEBENDE SPRACHEN},
  keywords     = {translation,noun-noun compounds,corpus-based research,semantic relations},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {117--147},
  publisher    = {De Gruyter Mouton},
  title        = {Dutch and German noun-noun compounds in translation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/les-2016-0006},
  volume       = {61},
  year         = {2016},
}

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