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Tree rings show a different climatic response in a managed and a non-managed plantation of teak (Tectona grandis) in West Africa

(2015) IAWA JOURNAL. 36(4). p.409-427
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Abstract
Establishing large-scale plantations of teak could reduce the pressure on natural forests and sequester atmospheric carbon into durable wood. Understanding the growth dynamics of this species in plantations, outside its natural distribution area, is crucial for forest management. Stem discs of teak were collected in Ivory Coast at two sites, a non-managed plantation (Gagnoa) and a managed plantation (Seguie). All stem discs were processed using the standard dendrochronological methods in order to unravel the relationships between growth and climate. Results showed that growth is slower in Gagnoa compared to the Seguie plantation that is being thinned regularly. In Gagnoa, trees responded positively to April rainfall, i.e., during the early stage of tree-ring formation, and negatively to September-October rainfall, i.e., during the short dry period. In Sgu, trees responded positively to July rainfall, i.e., during latewood formation, under decreasing rainfall. At both sites, tree growth was influenced by sea-surface temperature anomalies during the summer in the Gulf of Guinea. Teak growth in Sauie could be additionally linked to El Nino events, specifically during three major episodes (1976-77, 1982-83 and 1997-98).
Keywords
MONSOON, DROUGHT, EL-NINO, TROPICAL TREES, PINUS-HALEPENSIS, RAINFALL VARIABILITY, GROWTH RELATIONSHIPS, DRY-FOREST TREES, WATER-USE EFFICIENCY, INTRAANNUAL DENSITY-FLUCTUATIONS, ENSO, thinnings, sylviculture, sea-surface temperature, anomalies, climate variability

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Citation

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Chicago
DIE, Agathe, Maaike De Ridder, P Cherubini, FN Kouamé, A Verheyden, P Kitin, BB Toirambe, Jan Van den Bulcke, Joris Van Acker, and H Beeckman. 2015. “Tree Rings Show a Different Climatic Response in a Managed and a Non-managed Plantation of Teak (Tectona Grandis) in West Africa.” Iawa Journal 36 (4): 409–427.
APA
DIE, A., De Ridder, M., Cherubini, P., Kouamé, F., Verheyden, A., Kitin, P., Toirambe, B., et al. (2015). Tree rings show a different climatic response in a managed and a non-managed plantation of teak (Tectona grandis) in West Africa. IAWA JOURNAL, 36(4), 409–427.
Vancouver
1.
DIE A, De Ridder M, Cherubini P, Kouamé F, Verheyden A, Kitin P, et al. Tree rings show a different climatic response in a managed and a non-managed plantation of teak (Tectona grandis) in West Africa. IAWA JOURNAL. 2015;36(4):409–27.
MLA
DIE, Agathe, Maaike De Ridder, P Cherubini, et al. “Tree Rings Show a Different Climatic Response in a Managed and a Non-managed Plantation of Teak (Tectona Grandis) in West Africa.” IAWA JOURNAL 36.4 (2015): 409–427. Print.
@article{7172090,
  abstract     = {Establishing large-scale plantations of teak could reduce the pressure on natural forests and sequester atmospheric carbon into durable wood. Understanding the growth dynamics of this species in plantations, outside its natural distribution area, is crucial for forest management. Stem discs of teak were collected in Ivory Coast at two sites, a non-managed plantation (Gagnoa) and a managed plantation (Seguie). All stem discs were processed using the standard dendrochronological methods in order to unravel the relationships between growth and climate. Results showed that growth is slower in Gagnoa compared to the Seguie plantation that is being thinned regularly. In Gagnoa, trees responded positively to April rainfall, i.e., during the early stage of tree-ring formation, and negatively to September-October rainfall, i.e., during the short dry period. In Sgu, trees responded positively to July rainfall, i.e., during latewood formation, under decreasing rainfall. At both sites, tree growth was influenced by sea-surface temperature anomalies during the summer in the Gulf of Guinea. Teak growth in Sauie could be additionally linked to El Nino events, specifically during three major episodes (1976-77, 1982-83 and 1997-98).},
  author       = {DIE, Agathe and De Ridder, Maaike and Cherubini, P and Kouam{\'e}, FN and Verheyden, A and Kitin, P and Toirambe, BB and Van den Bulcke, Jan and Van Acker, Joris and Beeckman, H},
  issn         = {0928-1541},
  journal      = {IAWA JOURNAL},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {409--427},
  title        = {Tree rings show a different climatic response in a managed and a non-managed plantation of teak (Tectona grandis) in West Africa},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/22941932-20150111},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2015},
}

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