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Molecular and morphological insights into the origin of the invasive greater white-toothed shrew (Crocidura russula) in Ireland

(2016) BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS. 18(3). p.857-871
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Abstract
Identifying routes of invasion is a critical management strategy in controlling the spread of invasive species. This is challenging however in the absence of direct evidence. Therefore, indirect methodologies are used to infer possible invasion sources and routes, such as comparisons of genetic and morphological data from populations from invasive ranges and putative source areas. The greater white-toothed shrew (Crocidura russula) was first discovered in Ireland from skeletal remains in the pellets of birds of prey collected in 2007 and is it is now sufficiently established that the species has a detrimental impact on Ireland's small mammal community. In this study, we address the uncertain origin(s) of the Irish population of C. russula. The cytochrome b gene of mitochondrial DNA was analysed from 143 individuals from throughout its range within a phylogenetic and approximate Bayesian computation framework. These analyses revealed that the Irish population stemmed from Europe as opposed to North Africa. Additionally, mandibles from 523 individuals from Ireland and 28 other European populations were subjected to multivariate and distance-based analyses, which demonstrated an association between the Irish population and those in France, Switzerland and Belgium. When the genetic and morphological analyses were considered together, an origin stemming from France was deemed the most likely scenario for the source of the invasive Irish population. This study has demonstrated the importance of utilising a multidisciplinary approach when attempting to identify the origins and invasion routes of invasive species.
Keywords
HOUSE MICE, MICROSATELLITE DATA, POPULATION HISTORY, DNA-SEQUENCE, ANCIENT DNA, PINE MARTEN, Approximate Bayesian computation, Cytochrome b, Europe, Mandibles, Mitochondrial DNA, Morphometrics, APPROXIMATE BAYESIAN COMPUTATION, SUAVEOLENS GROUP, COLONIZATION HISTORY, CYTOCHROME-B GENE

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Gargan, Laura M, Raphaël Cornette, Jon M Yearsley, W Ian Montgomery, Joana Paupério, Paulo C Alves, Fidelma Butler, et al. 2016. “Molecular and Morphological Insights into the Origin of the Invasive Greater White-toothed Shrew (Crocidura Russula) in Ireland.” Biological Invasions 18 (3): 857–871.
APA
Gargan, L. M., Cornette, R., Yearsley, J. M., Montgomery, W. I., Paupério, J., Alves, P. C., Butler, F., et al. (2016). Molecular and morphological insights into the origin of the invasive greater white-toothed shrew (Crocidura russula) in Ireland. BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS, 18(3), 857–871.
Vancouver
1.
Gargan LM, Cornette R, Yearsley JM, Montgomery WI, Paupério J, Alves PC, et al. Molecular and morphological insights into the origin of the invasive greater white-toothed shrew (Crocidura russula) in Ireland. BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS. 2016;18(3):857–71.
MLA
Gargan, Laura M, Raphaël Cornette, Jon M Yearsley, et al. “Molecular and Morphological Insights into the Origin of the Invasive Greater White-toothed Shrew (Crocidura Russula) in Ireland.” BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS 18.3 (2016): 857–871. Print.
@article{7164986,
  abstract     = {Identifying routes of invasion is a critical management strategy in controlling the spread of invasive species. This is challenging however in the absence of direct evidence. Therefore, indirect methodologies are used to infer possible invasion sources and routes, such as comparisons of genetic and morphological data from populations from invasive ranges and putative source areas. The greater white-toothed shrew (Crocidura russula) was first discovered in Ireland from skeletal remains in the pellets of birds of prey collected in 2007 and is it is now sufficiently established that the species has a detrimental impact on Ireland's small mammal community. In this study, we address the uncertain origin(s) of the Irish population of C. russula. The cytochrome b gene of mitochondrial DNA was analysed from 143 individuals from throughout its range within a phylogenetic and approximate Bayesian computation framework. These analyses revealed that the Irish population stemmed from Europe as opposed to North Africa. Additionally, mandibles from 523 individuals from Ireland and 28 other European populations were subjected to multivariate and distance-based analyses, which demonstrated an association between the Irish population and those in France, Switzerland and Belgium. When the genetic and morphological analyses were considered together, an origin stemming from France was deemed the most likely scenario for the source of the invasive Irish population. This study has demonstrated the importance of utilising a multidisciplinary approach when attempting to identify the origins and invasion routes of invasive species.},
  author       = {Gargan, Laura M and Cornette, Rapha{\"e}l and Yearsley, Jon M and Montgomery, W Ian and Paup{\'e}rio, Joana and Alves, Paulo C and Butler, Fidelma and Pascal, Michel and Tresset, Anne and Herrel, Anthony and Lusby, John and Tosh, David G and Searle, Jeremy B and McDevitt, Allan D},
  issn         = {1387-3547},
  journal      = {BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {857--871},
  title        = {Molecular and morphological insights into the origin of the invasive greater white-toothed shrew (Crocidura russula) in Ireland},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-016-1056-y},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2016},
}

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