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Variation and evolution of minimum commuting distances in Flanders

Kobe Boussauw (UGent) and Frank Witlox (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
The distance covered by individual commuting trips increases year after year, regardless of the travel mode. Along with this evolution, also negative external effects increase, such as emissions, noise, accidents, congestion and energy consumption. The reasons for this phenomenon are diverse. Prosperity may be invoked as the main cause. From the discipline of spatial planning, however, land-use policies that enable sprawl are often also partly responsible. By calculating the theoretical minimum commuting distances for Flanders and Brussels, we want to introduce a methodology to quantify this sprawl, and to determine to what extent the spatial structure contributes to the traffic volume that we know today. First we evaluate the spatial variation in minimum commuting distances in 2005, based on population and job data per municipality. Then we quantify the evolution of the minimum commuting distances between 1997 and 2005. We find that the minimum commuting distances increased in many municipalities, in particular in those municipalities where the population grows faster than regional job supply, but we note also municipalities where the value is decreasing.
Keywords
sustainable spatial development, excess commuting, Flanders

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Boussauw, Kobe, and Frank Witlox. 2009. “Variation and Evolution of Minimum Commuting Distances in Flanders.” In Kuhmo-Nectar Conference and Summer School, 4th, Proceedings.
APA
Boussauw, K., & Witlox, F. (2009). Variation and evolution of minimum commuting distances in Flanders. Kuhmo-Nectar conference and summer school, 4th, Proceedings. Presented at the 4th Kuhmo-Nectar conference and summer school: Transport and urban economics.
Vancouver
1.
Boussauw K, Witlox F. Variation and evolution of minimum commuting distances in Flanders. Kuhmo-Nectar conference and summer school, 4th, Proceedings. 2009.
MLA
Boussauw, Kobe, and Frank Witlox. “Variation and Evolution of Minimum Commuting Distances in Flanders.” Kuhmo-Nectar Conference and Summer School, 4th, Proceedings. 2009. Print.
@inproceedings{714073,
  abstract     = {The distance covered by individual commuting trips increases year after year, regardless of the travel mode. Along with this evolution, also negative external effects increase, such as emissions, noise, accidents, congestion and energy consumption. The reasons for this phenomenon are diverse. Prosperity may be invoked as the main cause. From the discipline of spatial planning, however, land-use policies that enable sprawl are often also partly responsible. By calculating the theoretical minimum commuting distances for Flanders and Brussels, we want to introduce a methodology to quantify this sprawl, and to determine to what extent the spatial structure contributes to the traffic volume that we know today.
First we evaluate the spatial variation in minimum commuting distances in 2005, based on population and job data per municipality. Then we quantify the evolution of the minimum commuting distances between 1997 and 2005. We find that the minimum commuting distances increased in many municipalities, in particular in those municipalities where the population grows faster than regional job supply, but we note also municipalities where the value is decreasing.},
  author       = {Boussauw, Kobe and Witlox, Frank},
  booktitle    = {Kuhmo-Nectar conference and summer school, 4th, Proceedings},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Copenhagen, Denmark},
  pages        = {22},
  title        = {Variation and evolution of minimum commuting distances in Flanders},
  year         = {2009},
}