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Importance of core and linear marsh elements for wetland arthropod diversity in an agricultural landscape

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Abstract
The importance of linear habitat elements connecting core habitat patches for biodiversity conservation is still poorly understood. We surveyed reed strips along drainage ditches and reed marshes in an agricultural landscape to assess how both the density of linear habitat elements and the area of core habitat affect diversity and community composition of spiders, ground beetles, and long-legged flies. For each taxonomic group, species composition of both all' and typical wetland' species, but not species richness was different between ditches and marshes. Overall local species richness and richness of species of conservation interest were affected at a landscape scale both by the density of ditches and by the area of core wetland. Strength and direction of these effects differed among groups. An increase in the density of reed ditches positively affected the total species richness of spiders and ground beetles and the species richness of typical wetland ground beetles, but not for long-legged flies and typical wetland spiders. The positive effects were explained by improved network functionality, rather than by increase in available habitat area at landscape level. The number of red list spiders and long-legged flies increased only with increasing core wetland area, while no significant effects were found for the number of red list ground beetles. Our study revealed that preserving or increasing the density of habitat corridors (more reed ditches) can be beneficial for the species richness of particular predatory arthropods, including species of conservation concern (especially ground beetles). Other groups react indifferently or are only positively impacted by an increase of core wetland area.
Keywords
Araneae, Carabidae, connectivity, Dolichopodidae, drainage ditch, ecological compensation, green veins, habitat corridor, linear habitat elements, patch-matrix model, Phragmites australis, Species-area relationship, wetlands, SPECIES RICHNESS, FRAGMENTED LANDSCAPES, PHRAGMITES-AUSTRALIS, ASSEMBLAGE STRUCTURE, HABITAT CORRIDORS, AREA RELATIONSHIP, DRAINAGE DITCHES, CARABID BEETLES, BIODIVERSITY, CONNECTIVITY

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Chicago
Decleer, Kris, Dirk Maes, Hans Van Calster, Ivy Jansen, Marc Pollet, Wouter Dekoninck, Léon Baert, Patrick Grootaert, Rudy Van Diggelen, and Dries Bonte. 2015. “Importance of Core and Linear Marsh Elements for Wetland Arthropod Diversity in an Agricultural Landscape.” Insect Conservation and Diversity 8 (4): 289–301.
APA
Decleer, K., Maes, D., Van Calster, H., Jansen, I., Pollet, M., Dekoninck, W., Baert, L., et al. (2015). Importance of core and linear marsh elements for wetland arthropod diversity in an agricultural landscape. INSECT CONSERVATION AND DIVERSITY, 8(4), 289–301.
Vancouver
1.
Decleer K, Maes D, Van Calster H, Jansen I, Pollet M, Dekoninck W, et al. Importance of core and linear marsh elements for wetland arthropod diversity in an agricultural landscape. INSECT CONSERVATION AND DIVERSITY. 2015;8(4):289–301.
MLA
Decleer, Kris, Dirk Maes, Hans Van Calster, et al. “Importance of Core and Linear Marsh Elements for Wetland Arthropod Diversity in an Agricultural Landscape.” INSECT CONSERVATION AND DIVERSITY 8.4 (2015): 289–301. Print.
@article{7101850,
  abstract     = {The importance of linear habitat elements connecting core habitat patches for biodiversity conservation is still poorly understood. We surveyed reed strips along drainage ditches and reed marshes in an agricultural landscape to assess how both the density of linear habitat elements and the area of core habitat affect diversity and community composition of spiders, ground beetles, and long-legged flies. For each taxonomic group, species composition of both all' and typical wetland' species, but not species richness was different between ditches and marshes. Overall local species richness and richness of species of conservation interest were affected at a landscape scale both by the density of ditches and by the area of core wetland. Strength and direction of these effects differed among groups. An increase in the density of reed ditches positively affected the total species richness of spiders and ground beetles and the species richness of typical wetland ground beetles, but not for long-legged flies and typical wetland spiders. The positive effects were explained by improved network functionality, rather than by increase in available habitat area at landscape level. The number of red list spiders and long-legged flies increased only with increasing core wetland area, while no significant effects were found for the number of red list ground beetles. Our study revealed that preserving or increasing the density of habitat corridors (more reed ditches) can be beneficial for the species richness of particular predatory arthropods, including species of conservation concern (especially ground beetles). Other groups react indifferently or are only positively impacted by an increase of core wetland area.},
  author       = {Decleer, Kris and Maes, Dirk and Van Calster, Hans and Jansen, Ivy and Pollet, Marc and Dekoninck, Wouter and Baert, L{\'e}on and Grootaert, Patrick and Van Diggelen, Rudy and Bonte, Dries},
  issn         = {1752-458X},
  journal      = {INSECT CONSERVATION AND DIVERSITY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {289--301},
  title        = {Importance of core and linear marsh elements for wetland arthropod diversity in an agricultural landscape},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/icad.12110},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2015},
}

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