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Life history trade-offs imposed by dragline use in two money spiders

Dries Bonte UGent, Lieselot Verduyn and Bart Braeckman UGent (2016) JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY. 219(1). p.26-30
abstract
Trade-offs among life history traits are central to understanding the limits of adaptations to stress. In animals, virtually all decisions taken during life are expected to have downstream consequences. To what degree rare, but energy-demanding, decisions carry over to individual performance is rarely studied in arthropods. We used spiders as a model system to test how single investments in silk use - for dispersal or predator escape - affect individual performance. Silk produced for safe lines and as threads for ballooning is of the strongest kind and is energetically costly, especially when resources are limited. We induced dragline spinning in two species of money spider at similar quantities to that under natural conditions and tested trade-offs with lifespan and egg sac production under unlimited prey availability and a dietary restriction treatment. We demonstrate strong trade-offs between dragline spinning and survival and fecundity. Survival trade-offs were additive to those imposed by the dietary treatment, but a reduction in eggs produced after silk use was only prevalent under conditions where food was restricted during the spider's life. Because draglines are not recycled after their use for dispersal or predator escape, their spinning incurs substantial fitness costs in dispersal, especially in environments with prey limitation. Rare but energetically costly decisions related to dispersal or predator escape may thus carry over to adult performance and explain phenotypic heterogeneity in natural populations.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Erigone, Costs, Stress, Dietary restriction, Dispersal, Carry-over, LONG-DISTANCE DISPERSAL, MODELING DISPERSAL, SILK, BEHAVIOR, REPRODUCTION, RESTRICTION, POPULATIONS, EMIGRATION, STARVATION, LONGEVITY, Silk
journal title
JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY
J. Exp. Biol.
volume
219
issue
1
pages
26 - 30
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000368541900012
JCR category
BIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
3.32 (2016)
JCR rank
16/84 (2016)
JCR quartile
1 (2016)
ISSN
0022-0949
DOI
10.1242/jeb.132191
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
7101826
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-7101826
date created
2016-02-25 14:12:03
date last changed
2017-05-04 14:01:25
@article{7101826,
  abstract     = {Trade-offs among life history traits are central to understanding the limits of adaptations to stress. In animals, virtually all decisions taken during life are expected to have downstream consequences. To what degree rare, but energy-demanding, decisions carry over to individual performance is rarely studied in arthropods. We used spiders as a model system to test how single investments in silk use - for dispersal or predator escape - affect individual performance. Silk produced for safe lines and as threads for ballooning is of the strongest kind and is energetically costly, especially when resources are limited. We induced dragline spinning in two species of money spider at similar quantities to that under natural conditions and tested trade-offs with lifespan and egg sac production under unlimited prey availability and a dietary restriction treatment. We demonstrate strong trade-offs between dragline spinning and survival and fecundity. Survival trade-offs were additive to those imposed by the dietary treatment, but a reduction in eggs produced after silk use was only prevalent under conditions where food was restricted during the spider's life. Because draglines are not recycled after their use for dispersal or predator escape, their spinning incurs substantial fitness costs in dispersal, especially in environments with prey limitation. Rare but energetically costly decisions related to dispersal or predator escape may thus carry over to adult performance and explain phenotypic heterogeneity in natural populations.},
  author       = {Bonte, Dries and Verduyn, Lieselot and Braeckman, Bart},
  issn         = {0022-0949},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {Erigone,Costs,Stress,Dietary restriction,Dispersal,Carry-over,LONG-DISTANCE DISPERSAL,MODELING DISPERSAL,SILK,BEHAVIOR,REPRODUCTION,RESTRICTION,POPULATIONS,EMIGRATION,STARVATION,LONGEVITY,Silk},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {26--30},
  title        = {Life history trade-offs imposed by dragline use in two money spiders},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jeb.132191},
  volume       = {219},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
Bonte, Dries, Lieselot Verduyn, and Bart Braeckman. 2016. “Life History Trade-offs Imposed by Dragline Use in Two Money Spiders.” Journal of Experimental Biology 219 (1): 26–30.
APA
Bonte, D., Verduyn, L., & Braeckman, B. (2016). Life history trade-offs imposed by dragline use in two money spiders. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY, 219(1), 26–30.
Vancouver
1.
Bonte D, Verduyn L, Braeckman B. Life history trade-offs imposed by dragline use in two money spiders. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY. 2016;219(1):26–30.
MLA
Bonte, Dries, Lieselot Verduyn, and Bart Braeckman. “Life History Trade-offs Imposed by Dragline Use in Two Money Spiders.” JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY 219.1 (2016): 26–30. Print.