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Coronectomy of deeply impacted lower third molar: incidence of outcomes and complications after one year follow-up

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Abstract
Objectives: The purpose of present study was to assess the surgical management of impacted third molar with proximity to the inferior alveolar nerve and complications associated with coronectomy in a series of patients undergoing third molar surgery. Material and Methods: The position of the mandibular canal in relation to the mandibular third molar region and mandibular foramen in the front part of the mandible (i.e., third molar in close proximity to the inferior alveolar nerve [IAN] or not) was identified on panoramic radiographs of patients scheduled for third molar extraction. Results: Close proximity to the IAN was observed in 64 patients (35 females, 29 males) with an impacted mandibular third molar. Coronectomy was performed in these patients. The most common complication was tooth migration away from the mandibular canal (n = 14), followed by root exposure (n = 5). Re-operation to remove the root was performed in cases with periapical infection and root exposure. Conclusions: The results indicate that coronectomy can be considered a reasonable and safe treatment alternative for patients who demonstrate elevated risk for injury to the inferior alveolar nerve with removal of the third molars. Coronectomy did not increase the incidence of damage to the inferior alveolar nerve and would be safer than complete extraction in situations in which the root of the mandibular third molar overlaps or is in close proximity to the mandibular canal.
Keywords
complications, impacted tooth, third molar, oral surgery, inferior alveolar nerve

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Ajbage, Jimoh Olubanwo, Guido Heijsters, Ahmed Sobhy Salem, Sarah Van Slycke, Serge Schepers, Constantinus Politis, and Luc Vrielinck. 2015. “Coronectomy of Deeply Impacted Lower Third Molar: Incidence of Outcomes and Complications After One Year Follow-up.” Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Research 6 (2).
APA
Ajbage, J. O., Heijsters, G., Salem, A. S., Van Slycke, S., Schepers, S., Politis, C., & Vrielinck, L. (2015). Coronectomy of deeply impacted lower third molar: incidence of outcomes and complications after one year follow-up. JOURNAL OF ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL RESEARCH, 6(2).
Vancouver
1.
Ajbage JO, Heijsters G, Salem AS, Van Slycke S, Schepers S, Politis C, et al. Coronectomy of deeply impacted lower third molar: incidence of outcomes and complications after one year follow-up. JOURNAL OF ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL RESEARCH. 2015;6(2).
MLA
Ajbage, Jimoh Olubanwo et al. “Coronectomy of Deeply Impacted Lower Third Molar: Incidence of Outcomes and Complications After One Year Follow-up.” JOURNAL OF ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL RESEARCH 6.2 (2015): n. pag. Print.
@article{7098206,
  abstract     = {Objectives: The purpose of present study was to assess the surgical management of impacted third molar with proximity to the inferior alveolar nerve and complications associated with coronectomy in a series of patients undergoing third molar surgery.
Material and Methods: The position of the mandibular canal in relation to the mandibular third molar region and mandibular foramen in the front part of the mandible (i.e., third molar in close proximity to the inferior alveolar nerve [IAN] or not) was identified on panoramic radiographs of patients scheduled for third molar extraction.
Results: Close proximity to the IAN was observed in 64 patients (35 females, 29 males) with an impacted mandibular third molar. Coronectomy was performed in these patients. The most common complication was tooth migration away from the mandibular canal (n = 14), followed by root exposure (n = 5). Re-operation to remove the root was performed in cases with periapical infection and root exposure.
Conclusions: The results indicate that coronectomy can be considered a reasonable and safe treatment alternative for patients who demonstrate elevated risk for injury to the inferior alveolar nerve with removal of the third molars. Coronectomy did not increase the incidence of damage to the inferior alveolar nerve and would be safer than complete extraction in situations in which the root of the mandibular third molar overlaps or is in close proximity to the mandibular canal.},
  articleno    = {e1},
  author       = {Ajbage, Jimoh Olubanwo and Heijsters, Guido and Salem, Ahmed Sobhy and Van Slycke, Sarah and Schepers, Serge and Politis, Constantinus and Vrielinck, Luc},
  issn         = {2029-283X},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL RESEARCH},
  keywords     = {complications,impacted tooth,third molar,oral surgery,inferior alveolar nerve},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {7},
  title        = {Coronectomy of deeply impacted lower third molar: incidence of outcomes and complications after one year follow-up},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5037/jomr.2015.6201},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2015},
}

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