Advanced search
1 file | 198.53 KB Add to list

Fate of foodborne viruses in the 'Farm to Fork' chain of fresh produce

Dan Li (UGent) , Ann De Keuckelaere (UGent) and Mieke Uyttendaele (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Norovirus (NoV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) are the most important foodborne viruses. Fresh produce has been identified as an important vehicle for their transmission. In order to supply a basis to identify possible prevention and control strategies, this review intends to demonstrate the fate of foodborne viruses in the farm to fork chain of fresh produce, which include the introduction routes (contamination sources), the viral survival abilities at different stages, and the reactions of foodborne viruses towards the treatments used in food processing of fresh produce. In general, the preharvest contamination comes mainly from soli fertilizer or irrigation water, while the harvest and postharvest contaminations come mainly from food handlers, which can be both symptomatic and asymptomatic. Foodborne viruses show high stabilities in all the stages of fresh produce production and processing. Low-temperature storage and other currently used preservation techniques, as well as washing by water have shown limited added value for reducing the virus load on fresh produce. Chemical sanitizers, although with limitations, are strongly recommended to be applied in the wash water in order to minimize cross-contamination. Alternatively, radiation strategies have shown promising inactivating effects on foodborne viruses. For high-pressure processing and thermal treatment, efforts have to be made on setting up treatment parameters to induce sufficient viral inactivation within a food matrix and to protect the sensory and nutritional qualities of fresh produce to the largest extent.
Keywords
fresh produce, HAV, foodborne viruses, norovirus, HEPATITIS-A VIRUS, HIGH HYDROSTATIC-PRESSURE, REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION-PCR, HUMAN ENTERIC VIRUSES, HUMAN NOROVIRUS SURROGATES, QUANTITATIVE EXPOSURE MODEL, ELECTRON-BEAM IRRADIATION, MICROBIAL RISK-ASSESSMENT, FOOD-CONTACT SURFACES, WASTE-WATER TREATMENT

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 198.53 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Li, Dan, Ann De Keuckelaere, and Mieke Uyttendaele. “Fate of Foodborne Viruses in the ‘Farm to Fork’ Chain of Fresh Produce.” COMPREHENSIVE REVIEWS IN FOOD SCIENCE AND FOOD SAFETY 14.6 (2015): 755–770. Print.
APA
Li, D., De Keuckelaere, A., & Uyttendaele, M. (2015). Fate of foodborne viruses in the “Farm to Fork” chain of fresh produce. COMPREHENSIVE REVIEWS IN FOOD SCIENCE AND FOOD SAFETY, 14(6), 755–770.
Chicago author-date
Li, Dan, Ann De Keuckelaere, and Mieke Uyttendaele. 2015. “Fate of Foodborne Viruses in the ‘Farm to Fork’ Chain of Fresh Produce.” Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety 14 (6): 755–770.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Li, Dan, Ann De Keuckelaere, and Mieke Uyttendaele. 2015. “Fate of Foodborne Viruses in the ‘Farm to Fork’ Chain of Fresh Produce.” Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety 14 (6): 755–770.
Vancouver
1.
Li D, De Keuckelaere A, Uyttendaele M. Fate of foodborne viruses in the “Farm to Fork” chain of fresh produce. COMPREHENSIVE REVIEWS IN FOOD SCIENCE AND FOOD SAFETY. 2015;14(6):755–70.
IEEE
[1]
D. Li, A. De Keuckelaere, and M. Uyttendaele, “Fate of foodborne viruses in the ‘Farm to Fork’ chain of fresh produce,” COMPREHENSIVE REVIEWS IN FOOD SCIENCE AND FOOD SAFETY, vol. 14, no. 6, pp. 755–770, 2015.
@article{7092628,
  abstract     = {Norovirus (NoV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) are the most important foodborne viruses. Fresh produce has been identified as an important vehicle for their transmission. In order to supply a basis to identify possible prevention and control strategies, this review intends to demonstrate the fate of foodborne viruses in the farm to fork chain of fresh produce, which include the introduction routes (contamination sources), the viral survival abilities at different stages, and the reactions of foodborne viruses towards the treatments used in food processing of fresh produce. In general, the preharvest contamination comes mainly from soli fertilizer or irrigation water, while the harvest and postharvest contaminations come mainly from food handlers, which can be both symptomatic and asymptomatic. Foodborne viruses show high stabilities in all the stages of fresh produce production and processing. Low-temperature storage and other currently used preservation techniques, as well as washing by water have shown limited added value for reducing the virus load on fresh produce. Chemical sanitizers, although with limitations, are strongly recommended to be applied in the wash water in order to minimize cross-contamination. Alternatively, radiation strategies have shown promising inactivating effects on foodborne viruses. For high-pressure processing and thermal treatment, efforts have to be made on setting up treatment parameters to induce sufficient viral inactivation within a food matrix and to protect the sensory and nutritional qualities of fresh produce to the largest extent.},
  author       = {Li, Dan and De Keuckelaere, Ann and Uyttendaele, Mieke},
  issn         = {1541-4337},
  journal      = {COMPREHENSIVE REVIEWS IN FOOD SCIENCE AND FOOD SAFETY},
  keywords     = {fresh produce,HAV,foodborne viruses,norovirus,HEPATITIS-A VIRUS,HIGH HYDROSTATIC-PRESSURE,REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION-PCR,HUMAN ENTERIC VIRUSES,HUMAN NOROVIRUS SURROGATES,QUANTITATIVE EXPOSURE MODEL,ELECTRON-BEAM IRRADIATION,MICROBIAL RISK-ASSESSMENT,FOOD-CONTACT SURFACES,WASTE-WATER TREATMENT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {755--770},
  title        = {Fate of foodborne viruses in the 'Farm to Fork' chain of fresh produce},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1541-4337.12163},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2015},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: