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Effects of cognitive control training on the dynamics of (mal)adaptive emotion regulation in daily life

Kristof Hoorelbeke (UGent) , Ernst Koster (UGent) , Ineke Demeyer (UGent) , Tom Loeys (UGent) and Marie-Anne Vanderhasselt (UGent)
(2016) EMOTION. 16(7). p.945-956
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Organization
Abstract
Cognitive control plays a key role in both adaptive emotion regulation, such as positive reappraisal, and maladaptive emotion regulation, such as rumination, with both strategies playing a major role in resilience and well-being. As a result, cognitive control training (CCT) targeting working memory functioning may have the potential to reduce maladaptive emotion regulation and increase adaptive emotion regulation. The current study explored the effects of CCT on positive reappraisal ability in a lab context, and deployment and efficacy of positive appraisal and rumination in daily life. A sample of undergraduates (n = 83) was allocated to CCT or an active control condition, performing 10 online training sessions over a period of 14 days. Effects on regulation of affective states in daily life were assessed using experience sampling over a 7-day posttraining period. Results revealed a positive association between baseline cognitive control and self-reported use of adaptive emotion regulation strategies, whereas maladaptive emotion regulation strategies showed a negative association. CCT showed transfer to working memory functioning on the dual n-back task. Overall, effects of CCT on emotion regulation were limited to reducing deployment of rumination in low positive affective states. However, we did not find beneficial effects on indicators of adaptive emotion regulation. These findings are in line with previous studies targeting maladaptive emotion regulation but suggest limited use in enhancing adaptive emotion regulation in a healthy sample.
Keywords
INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES, DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS, CONTROLLED-TRIAL, POSITIVE AFFECT, NEGATIVE AFFECT, WORKING-MEMORY, RUMINATION, REAPPRAISAL, INTERFERENCE, STRESS, positive reappraisal, rumination, resilience, cognitive control, training

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Hoorelbeke, Kristof et al. “Effects of Cognitive Control Training on the Dynamics of (mal)adaptive Emotion Regulation in Daily Life.” EMOTION 16.7 (2016): 945–956. Print.
APA
Hoorelbeke, K., Koster, E., Demeyer, I., Loeys, T., & Vanderhasselt, M.-A. (2016). Effects of cognitive control training on the dynamics of (mal)adaptive emotion regulation in daily life. EMOTION, 16(7), 945–956.
Chicago author-date
Hoorelbeke, Kristof, Ernst Koster, Ineke Demeyer, Tom Loeys, and Marie-Anne Vanderhasselt. 2016. “Effects of Cognitive Control Training on the Dynamics of (mal)adaptive Emotion Regulation in Daily Life.” Emotion 16 (7): 945–956.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Hoorelbeke, Kristof, Ernst Koster, Ineke Demeyer, Tom Loeys, and Marie-Anne Vanderhasselt. 2016. “Effects of Cognitive Control Training on the Dynamics of (mal)adaptive Emotion Regulation in Daily Life.” Emotion 16 (7): 945–956.
Vancouver
1.
Hoorelbeke K, Koster E, Demeyer I, Loeys T, Vanderhasselt M-A. Effects of cognitive control training on the dynamics of (mal)adaptive emotion regulation in daily life. EMOTION. 2016;16(7):945–56.
IEEE
[1]
K. Hoorelbeke, E. Koster, I. Demeyer, T. Loeys, and M.-A. Vanderhasselt, “Effects of cognitive control training on the dynamics of (mal)adaptive emotion regulation in daily life,” EMOTION, vol. 16, no. 7, pp. 945–956, 2016.
@article{7090099,
  abstract     = {Cognitive control plays a key role in both adaptive emotion regulation, such as positive reappraisal, and maladaptive emotion regulation, such as rumination, with both strategies playing a major role in resilience and well-being. As a result, cognitive control training (CCT) targeting working memory functioning may have the potential to reduce maladaptive emotion regulation and increase adaptive emotion regulation. The current study explored the effects of CCT on positive reappraisal ability in a lab context, and deployment and efficacy of positive appraisal and rumination in daily life. A sample of undergraduates (n = 83) was allocated to CCT or an active control condition, performing 10 online training sessions over a period of 14 days. Effects on regulation of affective states in daily life were assessed using experience sampling over a 7-day posttraining period. Results revealed a positive association between baseline cognitive control and self-reported use of adaptive emotion regulation strategies, whereas maladaptive emotion regulation strategies showed a negative association. CCT showed transfer to working memory functioning on the dual n-back task. Overall, effects of CCT on emotion regulation were limited to reducing deployment of rumination in low positive affective states. However, we did not find beneficial effects on indicators of adaptive emotion regulation. These findings are in line with previous studies targeting maladaptive emotion regulation but suggest limited use in enhancing adaptive emotion regulation in a healthy sample.},
  author       = {Hoorelbeke, Kristof and Koster, Ernst and Demeyer, Ineke and Loeys, Tom and Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne},
  issn         = {1528-3542},
  journal      = {EMOTION},
  keywords     = {INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES,DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS,CONTROLLED-TRIAL,POSITIVE AFFECT,NEGATIVE AFFECT,WORKING-MEMORY,RUMINATION,REAPPRAISAL,INTERFERENCE,STRESS,positive reappraisal,rumination,resilience,cognitive control,training},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {945--956},
  title        = {Effects of cognitive control training on the dynamics of (mal)adaptive emotion regulation in daily life},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/emo0000169},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2016},
}

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