Advanced search
1 file | 579.10 KB Add to list

Effect of pedaling cadence on muscle oxygenation during high-intensity cycling until exhaustion: a comparison between untrained subjects and triathletes

Author
Organization
Abstract
Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the muscle oxygenation between trained and untrained subjects during heavy exercise until exhaustion at two extreme pedaling cadences using a NIRS system. Methods: Nine untrained male subjects and nine male competitive triathletes cycled until exhaustion at an intensity corresponding to 90 % of the power output achieved at peak oxygen uptake at 40 and 100 rpm. Gas exchanges were measured breath-by-breath during each exercise. Muscle (de) oxygenation was monitored continuously by near-infrared spectroscopy on the Vastus Lateralis. Results: Muscle deoxygenation (Delta deoxy[Hb + Mb], i.e., O-2 extraction) and Delta total[Hb + Mb] were significantly higher at 40 rpm compared to 100 rpm during the exercise in untrained subjects but not in triathletes (p < 0.05). The time performed until exhaustion was significantly higher at 40 than at 100 rpm in untrained subjects (373 +/- 55 vs. 234 +/- 37 s, respectively) but not in triathletes (339 +/- 69 vs. 325 +/- 66 s). Conclusions: These results indicate that high aerobic fitness (1) allows for better regulation between (V) over dotO(2M) and (Q) over dot O-2M following the change in pedaling cadence, and (2) is the most important factor in the relationship between pedaling cadence and performance.
Keywords
HUMANS, FIBER TYPE, EFFICIENCY, FREQUENCY, AEROBIC POWER, HEAVY EXERCISE, UPTAKE KINETICS, INTERNAL POWER, SKELETAL-MUSCLE, BLOOD-FLOW, Performance, Near-infrared spectroscopy, Aerobic fitness, Pedal rate, Pedal frequency, Muscle oxygenation

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 579.10 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Zorgati, Houssem et al. “Effect of Pedaling Cadence on Muscle Oxygenation During High-intensity Cycling Until Exhaustion: a Comparison Between Untrained Subjects and Triathletes.” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY 115.12 (2015): 2681–2689. Print.
APA
Zorgati, H., Collomp, K., Boone, J., Guimard, A., Buttelli, O., Mucci, P., Amiot, V., et al. (2015). Effect of pedaling cadence on muscle oxygenation during high-intensity cycling until exhaustion: a comparison between untrained subjects and triathletes. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY, 115(12), 2681–2689.
Chicago author-date
Zorgati, Houssem, Katia Collomp, Jan Boone, Alexandre Guimard, Olivier Buttelli, Patrick Mucci, Virgile Amiot, and Fabrice Prieur. 2015. “Effect of Pedaling Cadence on Muscle Oxygenation During High-intensity Cycling Until Exhaustion: a Comparison Between Untrained Subjects and Triathletes.” European Journal of Applied Physiology 115 (12): 2681–2689.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Zorgati, Houssem, Katia Collomp, Jan Boone, Alexandre Guimard, Olivier Buttelli, Patrick Mucci, Virgile Amiot, and Fabrice Prieur. 2015. “Effect of Pedaling Cadence on Muscle Oxygenation During High-intensity Cycling Until Exhaustion: a Comparison Between Untrained Subjects and Triathletes.” European Journal of Applied Physiology 115 (12): 2681–2689.
Vancouver
1.
Zorgati H, Collomp K, Boone J, Guimard A, Buttelli O, Mucci P, et al. Effect of pedaling cadence on muscle oxygenation during high-intensity cycling until exhaustion: a comparison between untrained subjects and triathletes. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY. 2015;115(12):2681–9.
IEEE
[1]
H. Zorgati et al., “Effect of pedaling cadence on muscle oxygenation during high-intensity cycling until exhaustion: a comparison between untrained subjects and triathletes,” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY, vol. 115, no. 12, pp. 2681–2689, 2015.
@article{7089400,
  abstract     = {Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the muscle oxygenation between trained and untrained subjects during heavy exercise until exhaustion at two extreme pedaling cadences using a NIRS system. 
Methods: Nine untrained male subjects and nine male competitive triathletes cycled until exhaustion at an intensity corresponding to 90 % of the power output achieved at peak oxygen uptake at 40 and 100 rpm. Gas exchanges were measured breath-by-breath during each exercise. Muscle (de) oxygenation was monitored continuously by near-infrared spectroscopy on the Vastus Lateralis. 
Results: Muscle deoxygenation (Delta deoxy[Hb + Mb], i.e., O-2 extraction) and Delta total[Hb + Mb] were significantly higher at 40 rpm compared to 100 rpm during the exercise in untrained subjects but not in triathletes (p < 0.05). The time performed until exhaustion was significantly higher at 40 than at 100 rpm in untrained subjects (373 +/- 55 vs. 234 +/- 37 s, respectively) but not in triathletes (339 +/- 69 vs. 325 +/- 66 s). 
Conclusions: These results indicate that high aerobic fitness (1) allows for better regulation between (V) over dotO(2M) and (Q) over dot O-2M following the change in pedaling cadence, and (2) is the most important factor in the relationship between pedaling cadence and performance.},
  author       = {Zorgati, Houssem and Collomp, Katia and Boone, Jan and Guimard, Alexandre and Buttelli, Olivier and Mucci, Patrick and Amiot, Virgile and Prieur, Fabrice},
  issn         = {1439-6319},
  journal      = {EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY},
  keywords     = {HUMANS,FIBER TYPE,EFFICIENCY,FREQUENCY,AEROBIC POWER,HEAVY EXERCISE,UPTAKE KINETICS,INTERNAL POWER,SKELETAL-MUSCLE,BLOOD-FLOW,Performance,Near-infrared spectroscopy,Aerobic fitness,Pedal rate,Pedal frequency,Muscle oxygenation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {2681--2689},
  title        = {Effect of pedaling cadence on muscle oxygenation during high-intensity cycling until exhaustion: a comparison between untrained subjects and triathletes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-015-3235-4},
  volume       = {115},
  year         = {2015},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: