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Preliminary results on auditory brainstem responses elicited by simultaneously presented electrical and acoustical signals in bimodal cochlear implant users

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Abstract
Introduction: Bimodal hearing refers to the condition in which electrical hearing via a cochlear implant (CI) is combined with residual hearing in the non-implanted ear. Psychoacoustic research demonstrates improvements in speech perception in noise and sound localization. There is however a large inter-subject variability in bimodal outcome, which may partly be explained by the capacity of the auditory brainstem to integrate electrical and acoustical signals. The present study suggests a technique to assess brainstem processing of bimodal stimulation. Methods: Ten bimodal listeners were included in the study. The non-implanted ear was stimulated acoustically, whereas the implanted ear was stimulated electrically. Before starting the ABR acquisition, the electrical and acoustical stimulation were pitch and loudness balanced. Subsequently, ABRs were recorded in response to monaural acoustical, monaural electrical, and bimodal stimulation. Results: Electrical ABRs were found in all subjects in both the monaural and bimodal condition. Acoustical ABRs, on the other hand, were absent in a substantial amount of subjects. In the monaural condition, acoustical ABRs were obtained in three subjects. In the bimodal condition, acoustical ABRs were present in one and absent in another subject. In yet another subject, a myogenic artifact occurred and may have obscured the acoustical ABR. Conclusion: To our knowledge, the present study is the first to use a bimodal ABR recording paradigm. Preliminary data show that bimodal ABRs can be recorded. However, obtaining these responses is challenging due to both technical and patient-related factors. Therefore, it is still unclear how these bimodal responses relate to electrical-acoustical integration. This presentation will suggest methods to improve the current protocol.

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Chicago
Van Yper, Lindsey, Ingeborg Dhooge, KATRIEN VERMEIRE, EDDY DE VEL, and Andy Beynon. 2015. “Preliminary Results on Auditory Brainstem Responses Elicited by Simultaneously Presented Electrical and Acoustical Signals in Bimodal Cochlear Implant Users.” In Royal Belgian Society for Ear, Nose, Throat, Head and Neck Surgery, Congress Abstracts.
APA
Van Yper, L., Dhooge, I., VERMEIRE, K., DE VEL, E., & Beynon, A. (2015). Preliminary results on auditory brainstem responses elicited by simultaneously presented electrical and acoustical signals in bimodal cochlear implant users. Royal Belgian Society for Ear, Nose, Throat, Head and Neck Surgery, Congress abstracts. Presented at the 2015 Congress of the Royal Belgian Society for Ear, Nose, Throat, Head and Neck Surgery.
Vancouver
1.
Van Yper L, Dhooge I, VERMEIRE K, DE VEL E, Beynon A. Preliminary results on auditory brainstem responses elicited by simultaneously presented electrical and acoustical signals in bimodal cochlear implant users. Royal Belgian Society for Ear, Nose, Throat, Head and Neck Surgery, Congress abstracts. 2015.
MLA
Van Yper, Lindsey, Ingeborg Dhooge, KATRIEN VERMEIRE, et al. “Preliminary Results on Auditory Brainstem Responses Elicited by Simultaneously Presented Electrical and Acoustical Signals in Bimodal Cochlear Implant Users.” Royal Belgian Society for Ear, Nose, Throat, Head and Neck Surgery, Congress Abstracts. 2015. Print.
@inproceedings{7089008,
  abstract     = {Introduction: Bimodal hearing refers to the condition in which electrical hearing via a cochlear implant (CI) is combined with residual hearing in the non-implanted ear. Psychoacoustic research demonstrates improvements in speech perception in noise and sound localization. There is however a large inter-subject variability in bimodal outcome, which may partly be explained by the capacity of the auditory brainstem to integrate electrical and acoustical signals. The present study suggests a technique to assess brainstem processing of bimodal stimulation. 
Methods: Ten bimodal listeners were included in the study. The non-implanted ear was stimulated acoustically, whereas the implanted ear was stimulated electrically. Before starting the ABR acquisition, the electrical and acoustical stimulation were pitch and loudness balanced. Subsequently, ABRs were recorded in response to monaural acoustical, monaural electrical, and bimodal stimulation. 
Results: Electrical ABRs were found in all subjects in both the monaural and bimodal condition. Acoustical ABRs, on the other hand, were absent in a substantial amount of subjects. In the monaural condition, acoustical ABRs were obtained in three subjects. In the bimodal condition, acoustical ABRs were present in one and absent in another subject. In yet another subject, a myogenic artifact occurred and may have obscured the acoustical ABR. 
Conclusion: To our knowledge, the present study is the first to use a bimodal ABR recording paradigm. Preliminary data show that bimodal ABRs can be recorded. However, obtaining these responses is challenging due to both technical and patient-related factors. Therefore, it is still unclear how these bimodal responses relate to electrical-acoustical integration. This presentation will suggest methods to improve the current protocol.},
  author       = {Van Yper, Lindsey and Dhooge, Ingeborg and VERMEIRE, KATRIEN and DE VEL, EDDY and Beynon, Andy},
  booktitle    = {Royal Belgian Society for Ear, Nose, Throat, Head and Neck Surgery, Congress abstracts},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Namur, Belgium},
  title        = {Preliminary results on auditory brainstem responses elicited by simultaneously presented electrical and acoustical signals in bimodal cochlear implant users},
  year         = {2015},
}