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Fictive Questions in Conditionals? Synchronic and Diachronic Evidence from German and English

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Abstract
This chapter discusses the alleged emergence of verb-first (V1) conditionals in English and German from question-driven fictive interaction of the type A: p? (B: Yes.) A: Then q. Since this scenario proves impossible to maintain with regard to English, an alternative model is proposed treating V1 as the grammaticalized residue of a stage in ancient Germanic at which word-order options were determined pragmatically instead of syntactically. The chapter shows that the conversational frame left its mark on V1-conditionals indirectly through the period as a rhetorical discourse unit in which V1 emerged as a marker of conditionality. This happened in different ways linked in part to the divergence of word-order systems between English and German.
Keywords
rhetorical discourse unit, verb-first conditionals, grammaticalization, Germanic

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Citation

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MLA
Leuschner, Torsten. “Fictive Questions in Conditionals? Synchronic and Diachronic Evidence from German and English.” The Conversation Frame: Forms and Functions of Fictive Interaction, edited by Esther Pascual and Sergeiy Sandler, vol. 55, John Benjamins, 2016, pp. 193–213.
APA
Leuschner, T. (2016). Fictive Questions in Conditionals? Synchronic and Diachronic Evidence from German and English. In E. Pascual & S. Sandler (Eds.), The Conversation Frame: Forms and Functions of Fictive Interaction (Vol. 55, pp. 193–213). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
Chicago author-date
Leuschner, Torsten. 2016. “Fictive Questions in Conditionals? Synchronic and Diachronic Evidence from German and English.” In The Conversation Frame: Forms and Functions of Fictive Interaction, edited by Esther Pascual and Sergeiy Sandler, 55:193–213. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Leuschner, Torsten. 2016. “Fictive Questions in Conditionals? Synchronic and Diachronic Evidence from German and English.” In The Conversation Frame: Forms and Functions of Fictive Interaction, ed by. Esther Pascual and Sergeiy Sandler, 55:193–213. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
Vancouver
1.
Leuschner T. Fictive Questions in Conditionals? Synchronic and Diachronic Evidence from German and English. In: Pascual E, Sandler S, editors. The Conversation Frame: Forms and Functions of Fictive Interaction. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins; 2016. p. 193–213.
IEEE
[1]
T. Leuschner, “Fictive Questions in Conditionals? Synchronic and Diachronic Evidence from German and English,” in The Conversation Frame: Forms and Functions of Fictive Interaction, vol. 55, E. Pascual and S. Sandler, Eds. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 2016, pp. 193–213.
@incollection{7086363,
  abstract     = {This chapter discusses the alleged emergence of verb-first (V1) conditionals in English and German from question-driven fictive interaction of the type A: p? (B: Yes.) A: Then q. Since this scenario proves impossible to maintain with regard to English, an alternative model is proposed treating V1 as the grammaticalized residue of a stage in ancient Germanic at which word-order options were determined pragmatically instead of syntactically. The chapter shows that the conversational frame left its mark on V1-conditionals indirectly through the period as a rhetorical discourse unit in which V1 emerged as a marker of conditionality. This happened in different ways linked in part to the divergence of word-order systems between English and German.},
  author       = {Leuschner, Torsten},
  booktitle    = {The Conversation Frame: Forms and Functions of Fictive Interaction},
  editor       = {Pascual, Esther and Sandler, Sergeiy},
  isbn         = {9789027246714},
  keywords     = {rhetorical discourse unit,verb-first conditionals,grammaticalization,Germanic},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {193--213},
  publisher    = {John Benjamins},
  series       = {Human Cognitive Processing},
  title        = {Fictive Questions in Conditionals? Synchronic and Diachronic Evidence from German and English},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/hcp.55.10leu},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {2016},
}

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