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Fictive Questions in Conditionals? Synchronic and Diachronic Evidence from German and English

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Abstract
This chapter discusses the alleged emergence of verb-first (V1) conditionals in English and German from question-driven fictive interaction of the type A: p? (B: Yes.) A: Then q. Since this scenario proves impossible to maintain with regard to English, an alternative model is proposed treating V1 as the grammaticalized residue of a stage in ancient Germanic at which word-order options were determined pragmatically instead of syntactically. The chapter shows that the conversational frame left its mark on V1-conditionals indirectly through the period as a rhetorical discourse unit in which V1 emerged as a marker of conditionality. This happened in different ways linked in part to the divergence of word-order systems between English and German.
Keywords
rhetorical discourse unit, verb-first conditionals, grammaticalization, Germanic

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Chicago
Leuschner, Torsten. 2016. “Fictive Questions in Conditionals? Synchronic and Diachronic Evidence from German and English.” In The Conversation Frame: Forms and Functions of Fictive Interaction, ed. Esther Pascual and Sergeiy Sandler, 55:193–213. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
APA
Leuschner, T. (2016). Fictive Questions in Conditionals? Synchronic and Diachronic Evidence from German and English. In E. Pascual & S. Sandler (Eds.), The Conversation Frame: Forms and Functions of Fictive Interaction (Vol. 55, pp. 193–213). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
Vancouver
1.
Leuschner T. Fictive Questions in Conditionals? Synchronic and Diachronic Evidence from German and English. In: Pascual E, Sandler S, editors. The Conversation Frame: Forms and Functions of Fictive Interaction. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins; 2016. p. 193–213.
MLA
Leuschner, Torsten. “Fictive Questions in Conditionals? Synchronic and Diachronic Evidence from German and English.” The Conversation Frame: Forms and Functions of Fictive Interaction. Ed. Esther Pascual & Sergeiy Sandler. Vol. 55. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 2016. 193–213. Print.
@incollection{7086363,
  abstract     = {This chapter discusses the alleged emergence of verb-first (V1) conditionals in English and German from question-driven fictive interaction of the type A: p? (B: Yes.) A: Then q. Since this scenario proves impossible to maintain with regard to English, an alternative model is proposed treating V1 as the grammaticalized residue of a stage in ancient Germanic at which word-order options were determined pragmatically instead of syntactically. The chapter shows that the conversational frame left its mark on V1-conditionals indirectly through the period as a rhetorical discourse unit in which V1 emerged as a marker of conditionality. This happened in different ways linked in part to the divergence of word-order systems between English and German.},
  author       = {Leuschner, Torsten},
  booktitle    = {The Conversation Frame: Forms and Functions of Fictive Interaction},
  editor       = {Pascual, Esther and Sandler, Sergeiy},
  isbn         = {9789027246714},
  keyword      = {rhetorical discourse unit,verb-first conditionals,grammaticalization,Germanic},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {193--213},
  publisher    = {John Benjamins},
  series       = {Human Cognitive Processing},
  title        = {Fictive Questions in Conditionals? Synchronic and Diachronic Evidence from German and English},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {2016},
}