Advanced search
1 file | 170.25 KB

Attentional bias moderates the link between attachment-related expectations and non-suicidal self-injury

(2016) COGNITIVE THERAPY AND RESEARCH. 40(4). p.540-548
Author
Organization
Abstract
Insecure attachment is a transdiagnostic risk factor for the development of emotional and behavior problems. In the present study, we investigated the association between attachment-related expectations and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in a sample of 42 university students, taking into account the attentional bias around mother as a mechanism to explain this association. All participants completed the Self-Harm Inventory to assess life-time NSSI and the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment and the Attentional Breadth Task. Overall, 28.6 % of the participants engaged in at least one type of life-time NSSI. The results showed that participants who are less able to trust their mother are less likely to communicate with her, which is linked to more life-time NSSI, but only when their attention is more focused on her. Therefore, from a clinical point of view, it is advisable to also focus on the child-parent interaction while preventing or treating NSSI in adolescents and young adults.
Keywords
BEHAVIOR, FAMILY-THERAPY, ADOLESCENTS, MODELS, INVENTORY, Attachment, Non-suicidal Self-Injury, Attention

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 170.25 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Claes, Laurence, Rudi De Raedt, Magali Van de Walle, and Guy Bosmans. 2016. “Attentional Bias Moderates the Link Between Attachment-related Expectations and Non-suicidal Self-injury.” Cognitive Therapy and Research 40 (4): 540–548.
APA
Claes, Laurence, De Raedt, R., Van de Walle, M., & Bosmans, G. (2016). Attentional bias moderates the link between attachment-related expectations and non-suicidal self-injury. COGNITIVE THERAPY AND RESEARCH, 40(4), 540–548.
Vancouver
1.
Claes L, De Raedt R, Van de Walle M, Bosmans G. Attentional bias moderates the link between attachment-related expectations and non-suicidal self-injury. COGNITIVE THERAPY AND RESEARCH. 2016;40(4):540–8.
MLA
Claes, Laurence et al. “Attentional Bias Moderates the Link Between Attachment-related Expectations and Non-suicidal Self-injury.” COGNITIVE THERAPY AND RESEARCH 40.4 (2016): 540–548. Print.
@article{7084512,
  abstract     = {Insecure attachment is a transdiagnostic risk factor for the development of emotional and behavior problems. In the present study, we investigated the association between attachment-related expectations and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in a sample of 42 university students, taking into account the attentional bias around mother as a mechanism to explain this association. All participants completed the Self-Harm Inventory to assess life-time NSSI and the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment and the Attentional Breadth Task. Overall, 28.6 % of the participants engaged in at least one type of life-time NSSI. The results showed that participants who are less able to trust their mother are less likely to communicate with her, which is linked to more life-time NSSI, but only when their attention is more focused on her. Therefore, from a clinical point of view, it is advisable to also focus on the child-parent interaction while preventing or treating NSSI in adolescents and young adults.},
  author       = {Claes, Laurence and De Raedt, Rudi and Van de Walle, Magali and Bosmans, Guy},
  issn         = {0147-5916},
  journal      = {COGNITIVE THERAPY AND RESEARCH},
  keywords     = {BEHAVIOR,FAMILY-THERAPY,ADOLESCENTS,MODELS,INVENTORY,Attachment,Non-suicidal Self-Injury,Attention},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {540--548},
  title        = {Attentional bias moderates the link between attachment-related expectations and non-suicidal self-injury},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10608-016-9761-5},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2016},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: