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Friendships matter: a cross-sectional latent class analysis of game addiction symptoms and online social interactions

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Abstract
We found that when combinations of online and gaming behaviors are considered as part of a PG syndrome, gamers could be clearly separated into social and non-social subgroups, with social classes reporting fewer feelings of problematic use at similar levels of play. These findings suggest that patterns of symptoms and gaming behavior thought to delineate problematic or disordered gaming are not independent of social online behaviors. The social subgroups may represent “engaged gamers” whose heavy gaming may be part of their active participation in a digital community. Before friendship quality was taken into account, all heavy gaming classes in both boys and girls were associated with more depressive symptoms. One possible explanation for this is heavy gamers feel depressed, and their heavy gaming, even with extensive social interaction, is not enough to relieve symptoms (Caplan, Williams, & Yee, 2009).
Keywords
Problematic Gaming, Friendship quality

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Colder Carras, Michelle, Tony van Rooij, Dike Van de Mheen, Rashelle Musci, Qian-Li Xue, and Tamar Mendelson. 2016. “Friendships Matter: a Cross-sectional Latent Class Analysis of Game Addiction Symptoms and Online Social Interactions.” In ICA 2016, Preconference “Just Games.”
APA
Colder Carras, M., van Rooij, T., Van de Mheen, D., Musci, R., Xue, Q.-L., & Mendelson, T. (2016). Friendships matter: a cross-sectional latent class analysis of game addiction symptoms and online social interactions. ICA 2016, Preconference “Just Games.” Presented at the International Communication Association.
Vancouver
1.
Colder Carras M, van Rooij T, Van de Mheen D, Musci R, Xue Q-L, Mendelson T. Friendships matter: a cross-sectional latent class analysis of game addiction symptoms and online social interactions. ICA 2016, Preconference “Just Games.” 2016.
MLA
Colder Carras, Michelle, Tony van Rooij, Dike Van de Mheen, et al. “Friendships Matter: a Cross-sectional Latent Class Analysis of Game Addiction Symptoms and Online Social Interactions.” ICA 2016, Preconference “Just Games.” 2016. Print.
@inproceedings{7081616,
  abstract     = {We found that when combinations of online and gaming behaviors are considered as part of a PG syndrome, gamers could be clearly separated into social and non-social subgroups, with social classes reporting fewer feelings of problematic use at similar levels of play. These findings suggest that patterns of symptoms and gaming behavior thought to delineate problematic or disordered gaming are not independent of social online behaviors. The social subgroups may represent {\textquotedblleft}engaged gamers{\textquotedblright} whose heavy gaming may be part of their active participation in a digital community. Before friendship quality was taken into account, all heavy gaming classes in both boys and girls were associated with more depressive symptoms. One possible explanation for this is heavy gamers feel depressed, and their heavy gaming, even with extensive social interaction, is not enough to relieve symptoms (Caplan, Williams, \& Yee, 2009).},
  author       = {Colder Carras, Michelle and van Rooij, Tony and Van de Mheen, Dike and Musci, Rashelle and Xue, Qian-Li and Mendelson, Tamar},
  booktitle    = {ICA 2016, Preconference 'Just Games'},
  keyword      = {Problematic Gaming,Friendship quality},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Tokyo},
  title        = {Friendships matter: a cross-sectional latent class analysis of game addiction symptoms and online social interactions},
  year         = {2016},
}