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Comparison of Newcastle disease vaccine administered as powder or liquid in relation to the serum antibody response and adverse vaccinal reactions in broilers

WJM Landman, Katrien Huyge, Jean Paul Remon UGent, Chris Vervaet UGent and JHH van Eck (2015) AVIAN PATHOLOGY. 44(2). p.114-123
abstract
Liquid spray and aerosol mass vaccination of poultry have several drawbacks, such as uncontrolled deposition of vaccine particles in the respiratory tract and vaccine virus inactivation by formation and evaporation of droplets. These may be addressed by using dry powder vaccines with defined particle size distribution targeting the upper (primary vaccination) or the entire respiratory tract (booster vaccination). Therefore, a coarse Newcastle disease (LZ58 strain) powder vaccine was administered to specified pathogen free (SPF) broiler hens to compare the antibody response and adverse vaccinal reactions with those induced by a coarse liquid spray and a fine liquid aerosol. Groups of 40 broilers each housed in isolators were vaccinated at 4 days of age and intratracheally inoculated with Escherichia coli (strain 506) at 11 days of age. Adverse vaccinal reactions were evaluated by measuring body weight gain and mortality between 4 and 11 days of age and between 11 and 18 days of age, and by recording colibacillosis lesions at 18 days of age. The antibody serum response was measured at 18 days of age by the haemagglutination inhibition test. Despite the relative low initial vaccine virus loss and narrow particle size distribution of the powder vaccines in comparison with their liquid counter parts, no significant differences (P > 0.05) regarding adverse vaccinal reactions and antibody response were observed between broilers vaccinated with the powder vaccines or with their liquid counterparts.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
POULTRY, VIRUS, MASS VACCINATION, CHICKENS, RESPIRATORY-TRACT, ESCHERICHIA-COLI, LABORATORY EVALUATION, COLIBACILLOSIS SUSCEPTIBILITY, AEROSOL VACCINATION, INFECTIOUS-BRONCHITIS
journal title
AVIAN PATHOLOGY
Avian Pathol.
volume
44
issue
2
pages
114 - 123
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000350384500008
JCR category
VETERINARY SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
1.336 (2015)
JCR rank
36/138 (2015)
JCR quartile
2 (2015)
ISSN
0307-9457
DOI
10.1080/03079457.2015.1007920
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
7066091
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-7066091
date created
2016-02-02 09:59:49
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:47:08
@article{7066091,
  abstract     = {Liquid spray and aerosol mass vaccination of poultry have several drawbacks, such as uncontrolled deposition of vaccine particles in the respiratory tract and vaccine virus inactivation by formation and evaporation of droplets. These may be addressed by using dry powder vaccines with defined particle size distribution targeting the upper (primary vaccination) or the entire respiratory tract (booster vaccination). Therefore, a coarse Newcastle disease (LZ58 strain) powder vaccine was administered to specified pathogen free (SPF) broiler hens to compare the antibody response and adverse vaccinal reactions with those induced by a coarse liquid spray and a fine liquid aerosol. Groups of 40 broilers each housed in isolators were vaccinated at 4 days of age and intratracheally inoculated with Escherichia coli (strain 506) at 11 days of age. Adverse vaccinal reactions were evaluated by measuring body weight gain and mortality between 4 and 11 days of age and between 11 and 18 days of age, and by recording colibacillosis lesions at 18 days of age. The antibody serum response was measured at 18 days of age by the haemagglutination inhibition test. Despite the relative low initial vaccine virus loss and narrow particle size distribution of the powder vaccines in comparison with their liquid counter parts, no significant differences (P {\textrangle} 0.05) regarding adverse vaccinal reactions and antibody response were observed between broilers vaccinated with the powder vaccines or with their liquid counterparts.},
  author       = {Landman, WJM and Huyge, Katrien and Remon, Jean Paul and Vervaet, Chris and van Eck, JHH},
  issn         = {0307-9457},
  journal      = {AVIAN PATHOLOGY},
  keyword      = {POULTRY,VIRUS,MASS VACCINATION,CHICKENS,RESPIRATORY-TRACT,ESCHERICHIA-COLI,LABORATORY EVALUATION,COLIBACILLOSIS SUSCEPTIBILITY,AEROSOL VACCINATION,INFECTIOUS-BRONCHITIS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {114--123},
  title        = {Comparison of Newcastle disease vaccine administered as powder or liquid in relation to the serum antibody response and adverse vaccinal reactions in broilers},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03079457.2015.1007920},
  volume       = {44},
  year         = {2015},
}

Chicago
Landman, WJM, Katrien Huyge, Jean Paul Remon, Chris Vervaet, and JHH van Eck. 2015. “Comparison of Newcastle Disease Vaccine Administered as Powder or Liquid in Relation to the Serum Antibody Response and Adverse Vaccinal Reactions in Broilers.” Avian Pathology 44 (2): 114–123.
APA
Landman, W., Huyge, K., Remon, J. P., Vervaet, C., & van Eck, J. (2015). Comparison of Newcastle disease vaccine administered as powder or liquid in relation to the serum antibody response and adverse vaccinal reactions in broilers. AVIAN PATHOLOGY, 44(2), 114–123.
Vancouver
1.
Landman W, Huyge K, Remon JP, Vervaet C, van Eck J. Comparison of Newcastle disease vaccine administered as powder or liquid in relation to the serum antibody response and adverse vaccinal reactions in broilers. AVIAN PATHOLOGY. 2015;44(2):114–23.
MLA
Landman, WJM, Katrien Huyge, Jean Paul Remon, et al. “Comparison of Newcastle Disease Vaccine Administered as Powder or Liquid in Relation to the Serum Antibody Response and Adverse Vaccinal Reactions in Broilers.” AVIAN PATHOLOGY 44.2 (2015): 114–123. Print.