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Speech production and speech perception deficits in Parkinson's disease: are they related?

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Abstract
Background - Hypokinetic dysarthria in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) has been traditionally attributed to classic signs of the disease, namely muscle rigidity and bradykinesia. To date, research recognizes a broader alternative view in which hypokinetic dysarthria is considered to be more than a pure production deficit. This study aimed to examine a possible relationship between hypokinetic speech production and speech intensity perception in PD. Methods - Subjects included 14 patients with idiopathic PD and 14 one-to-one matched healthy control speakers (HC) with normal hearing and cognition. First, speech production was objectified through a standardized and norm-referenced speech intelligibility assessment at sentence level (DIA-S) and through acoustic analysis (F0 variability, amplitude variability, F2 transition, VSA, spectral centroid, speech diadochokinetic rate, jitter, shimmer, and MPT). Correlations between acoustic analysis and speech intelligibility were computed. Speech intensity was examined based on different tasks (spontaneous speech, reading and sustained phonation). Second, overall speech perception was determined by an overall estimation task, performed in two different conditions (immediate versus playback perception) based on two different tasks (spontaneous speech and reading). An intensity estimation task was addressed to evaluate speech intensity perception. Finally, the interaction between speech production and speech intensity perception was investigated by an intensity imitation task. Results - Concerning speech production, F0 variability and MPT were significantly decreased in patients with PD. Significant positive correlations were found between F0 variability, F2 transition, spectral centroid, and speech intelligibility. Speech intensity seemed to be task dependent. Concerning speech perception, significant differences between the different conditions and tasks in the overall estimation task were only found in the PD group. These results emphasize the discrepancy between spontaneous speech and cued regulation (e.g. non-propositional speech, auditory feedback) in patients with PD and point at the role of attention and feedback processes in the auditory perception of speech in PD. Despite the low cognitive load of the intensity estimation and imitation task, a different pattern in the auditory perception of speech intensity could be demonstrated in the PD group. Conclusions - Auditory perceptual deficits may influence speech production in patients with PD. The present results suggest a disturbed auditory perception related to an automatic monitoring deficit in PD.

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MLA
De Keyser, Kim, Patrick Santens, Annelies Bockstael, et al. “Speech Production and Speech Perception Deficits in Parkinson’s Disease: Are They Related?” Studenten OnderzoeksSymposium, 5e, Abstracts. Studentenraad Geneeskunde en Gezondheidswetenschappen (StuGG) ; Studentenraad Faculteit Farmacie (StuFF), 2015. Print.
APA
De Keyser, Kim, Santens, P., Bockstael, A., Botteldooren, D., Talsma, D., De Vos, S., Van Cauwenberghe, M., et al. (2015). Speech production and speech perception deficits in Parkinson’s disease: are they related? Studenten OnderzoeksSymposium, 5e, Abstracts. Presented at the 5e Studenten OnderzoeksSymposium (SOS), Studentenraad Geneeskunde en Gezondheidswetenschappen (StuGG) ; Studentenraad Faculteit Farmacie (StuFF).
Chicago author-date
De Keyser, Kim, Patrick Santens, Annelies Bockstael, Dick Botteldooren, Durk Talsma, Stefanie De Vos, Mieke Van Cauwenberghe, Femke Verheugen, Paul Corthals, and Miet De Letter. 2015. “Speech Production and Speech Perception Deficits in Parkinson’s Disease: Are They Related?” In Studenten OnderzoeksSymposium, 5e, Abstracts. Studentenraad Geneeskunde en Gezondheidswetenschappen (StuGG) ; Studentenraad Faculteit Farmacie (StuFF).
Chicago author-date (all authors)
De Keyser, Kim, Patrick Santens, Annelies Bockstael, Dick Botteldooren, Durk Talsma, Stefanie De Vos, Mieke Van Cauwenberghe, Femke Verheugen, Paul Corthals, and Miet De Letter. 2015. “Speech Production and Speech Perception Deficits in Parkinson’s Disease: Are They Related?” In Studenten OnderzoeksSymposium, 5e, Abstracts. Studentenraad Geneeskunde en Gezondheidswetenschappen (StuGG) ; Studentenraad Faculteit Farmacie (StuFF).
Vancouver
1.
De Keyser K, Santens P, Bockstael A, Botteldooren D, Talsma D, De Vos S, et al. Speech production and speech perception deficits in Parkinson’s disease: are they related? Studenten OnderzoeksSymposium, 5e, Abstracts. Studentenraad Geneeskunde en Gezondheidswetenschappen (StuGG) ; Studentenraad Faculteit Farmacie (StuFF); 2015.
IEEE
[1]
K. De Keyser et al., “Speech production and speech perception deficits in Parkinson’s disease: are they related?,” in Studenten OnderzoeksSymposium, 5e, Abstracts, Gent, 2015.
@inproceedings{7062800,
  abstract     = {Background - Hypokinetic dysarthria in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) has been traditionally attributed to classic signs of the disease, namely muscle rigidity and bradykinesia. To date, research recognizes a broader alternative view in which hypokinetic dysarthria is considered to be more than a pure production deficit. This study aimed to examine a possible relationship between hypokinetic speech production and speech intensity perception in PD.
Methods - Subjects included 14 patients with idiopathic PD and 14 one-to-one matched healthy control speakers (HC) with normal hearing and cognition. First, speech production was objectified through a standardized and norm-referenced speech intelligibility assessment at sentence level (DIA-S) and through acoustic analysis (F0 variability, amplitude variability, F2 transition, VSA, spectral centroid, speech diadochokinetic rate, jitter, shimmer, and MPT). Correlations between acoustic analysis and speech intelligibility were computed. Speech intensity was examined based on different tasks (spontaneous speech, reading and sustained phonation). Second, overall speech perception was determined by an overall estimation task, performed in two different conditions (immediate versus playback perception) based on two different tasks (spontaneous speech and reading). An intensity estimation task was addressed to evaluate speech intensity perception. Finally, the interaction between speech production and speech intensity perception was investigated by an intensity imitation task.
Results - Concerning speech production, F0 variability and MPT were significantly decreased in patients with PD. Significant positive correlations were found between F0 variability, F2 transition, spectral centroid, and speech intelligibility. Speech intensity seemed to be task dependent. Concerning speech perception, significant differences between the different conditions and tasks in the overall estimation task were only found in the PD group. These results emphasize the discrepancy between spontaneous speech and cued regulation (e.g. non-propositional speech, auditory feedback) in patients with PD and point at the role of attention and feedback processes in the auditory perception of speech in PD. Despite the low cognitive load of the intensity estimation and imitation task, a different pattern in the auditory perception of speech intensity could be demonstrated in the PD group.
Conclusions - Auditory perceptual deficits may influence speech production in patients with PD. The present results suggest a disturbed auditory perception related to an automatic monitoring deficit in PD.},
  author       = {De Keyser, Kim and Santens, Patrick and Bockstael, Annelies and Botteldooren, Dick and Talsma, Durk and De Vos, Stefanie and Van Cauwenberghe, Mieke and Verheugen, Femke and Corthals, Paul and De Letter, Miet},
  booktitle    = {Studenten OnderzoeksSymposium, 5e, Abstracts},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Gent},
  publisher    = {Studentenraad Geneeskunde en Gezondheidswetenschappen (StuGG) ; Studentenraad Faculteit Farmacie (StuFF)},
  title        = {Speech production and speech perception deficits in Parkinson's disease: are they related?},
  year         = {2015},
}