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Volunteering through governments as a governmental technique: capturing its social-political significance

Els De Waele (UGent) and Lesley Hustinx (UGent)
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Abstract
Recently, new developments regarding volunteering have been signaled in the academic literature. One of these developments concerns a growing trend of government intervention in the field of volunteering6,1,5,3,2. In one expression of this trend, volunteer work is increasingly being used by government institutions as an instrument to develop active citizenship in socially excluded individuals2. In practice, then, public benefit agencies refer welfare recipients to volunteer in organizations in the public or the third sector in an attempt to re-integrate them. The volunteering which results from this practice can be considered to be ‘volunteering through governments’ (VtG). The emergence of VtG is predominantly framed in the academic debate as an answer to the widely held conviction of increasing individualization and declining civic-mindedness3,2. Yet, when VtG is placed against the background of the wider social-political tendencies which are currently at play in modern welfare regimes, it becomes clear that this phenomenon is part of fundamental changes in the present day social-political relations. We argue that under these changing social-political conditions, VtG presents itself as a governmental technique4 aimed at the creation of active/affective citizens. In our paper, then, we aim to answer following research questions: (1) What does VtG entail as a governmental technique?; and (2) What is the social-political significance of VtG as a governmental technique? We study VtG in the case of the Belgian Public Centers for Social Welfare (PCSW); a public benefit agency which has as its core task the realization of the right to social integration of welfare recipients. Based on an analysis of the way VTG is framed in internal documents and in interviews with key figures of the PCSW, we aim to make a critical evaluation of the specific state – third sector partnership VtG fosters. References 1 Haski-Leventhal, D., Meijs, L.C.P.M., & Hustinx, L. (2009). The third-party model: enhancing volunteering through governments, corporations and educational institutes. Journal of Social Policy, 39(1): 139-158). 2 Hustinx, L. & Meijs, L. (2011). Re-embedding volunteering: in search of a new collective ground. Voluntary Sector Review, 2(1): 5-21. 3 Hustinx, L. (2010). Institutionally individualized volunteering: towards a late modern re-construction. Journal of Civil Society, 6(2): 165-179. 4 Rose, N. & Miller, P. (2010). Political power beyond the state: problematics of government. The British Journal of Sociology, 61(s1): 271-303. 5 Strickland, A. (2010). Recent developments in volunteering and citizenship. Voluntary Sector Review, 1(2): 253-258. 6 van Hal, T., Meijs, L., & Steenbergen, M. (2004). Volunteering and participation on the agenda: Survey on volunteering policies and partnerships in the European Union. Utrecht: CIVIQ.

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Chicago
De Waele, Els, and Lesley Hustinx. 2015. “Volunteering Through Governments as a Governmental Technique: Capturing Its Social-political Significance.” In IRSPM Conference, Abstracts.
APA
De Waele, E., & Hustinx, L. (2015). Volunteering through governments as a governmental technique: capturing its social-political significance. IRSPM Conference, Abstracts. Presented at the IRSPM Conference.
Vancouver
1.
De Waele E, Hustinx L. Volunteering through governments as a governmental technique: capturing its social-political significance. IRSPM Conference, Abstracts. 2015.
MLA
De Waele, Els, and Lesley Hustinx. “Volunteering Through Governments as a Governmental Technique: Capturing Its Social-political Significance.” IRSPM Conference, Abstracts. 2015. Print.
@inproceedings{7055951,
  abstract     = {Recently, new developments regarding volunteering have been signaled in the academic literature. One of these developments concerns a growing trend of government intervention in the field of volunteering6,1,5,3,2. In one expression of this trend, volunteer work is increasingly being used by government institutions as an instrument to develop active citizenship in socially excluded individuals2. In practice, then, public benefit agencies refer welfare recipients to volunteer in organizations in the public or the third sector in an attempt to re-integrate them. The volunteering which results from this practice can be considered to be {\textquoteleft}volunteering through governments{\textquoteright} (VtG). The emergence of VtG is predominantly framed in the academic debate as an answer to the widely held conviction of increasing individualization and declining civic-mindedness3,2. Yet, when VtG is placed against the background of the wider social-political tendencies which are currently at play in modern welfare regimes, it becomes clear that this phenomenon is part of fundamental changes in the present day social-political relations. We argue that under these changing social-political conditions, VtG presents itself as a governmental technique4 aimed at the creation of active/affective citizens.\unmatched{0009}
\unmatched{0009}In our paper, then, we aim to answer following research questions: (1) What does VtG entail as a governmental technique?; and (2) What is the social-political significance of VtG as a governmental technique?\unmatched{0009}
\unmatched{0009}We study VtG in the case of the Belgian Public Centers for Social Welfare (PCSW); a public benefit agency which has as its core task the realization of the right to social integration of welfare recipients.  Based on an analysis of the way VTG is framed in internal documents and in interviews with key figures of the PCSW, we aim to make a critical evaluation of the specific state -- third sector partnership VtG fosters.
References
1\unmatched{0009}Haski-Leventhal, D., Meijs, L.C.P.M., \& Hustinx, L. (2009). The third-party model: enhancing volunteering through governments, corporations and educational institutes. Journal of Social Policy, 39(1): 139-158).
2\unmatched{0009}Hustinx, L. \& Meijs, L. (2011). Re-embedding volunteering: in search of a new collective ground. Voluntary Sector Review, 2(1): 5-21.
3\unmatched{0009}Hustinx, L. (2010). Institutionally individualized volunteering: towards a late modern re-construction. Journal of Civil Society, 6(2): 165-179.
4\unmatched{0009}Rose, N. \& Miller, P. (2010). Political power beyond the state: problematics of government. The British Journal of Sociology, 61(s1): 271-303.
5\unmatched{0009}Strickland, A. (2010). Recent developments in volunteering and citizenship. Voluntary Sector Review, 1(2): 253-258.
6\unmatched{0009}van Hal, T., Meijs, L., \& Steenbergen, M. (2004). Volunteering and participation on the agenda: Survey on volunteering policies and partnerships in the European Union. Utrecht: CIVIQ.},
  author       = {De Waele, Els and Hustinx, Lesley},
  booktitle    = {IRSPM Conference, Abstracts},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Birmingham, United Kingdom},
  title        = {Volunteering through governments as a governmental technique: capturing its social-political significance},
  year         = {2015},
}