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Host and parasite life history interplay to yield divergent population genetic structures in two ectoparasites living on the same bat species

Jaap Van Schaik, Daan Dekeukeleire UGent and Gerald Kerth (2015) MOLECULAR ECOLOGY. 24(10). p.2324-2335
abstract
Host–parasite interactions are ubiquitous in nature. However, how parasite population genetic structure is shaped by the interaction between host and parasite life history remains understudied. Studies comparing multiple parasites infecting a single host can be used to investigate how different parasite life history traits interplay with host behaviour and life history. In this study, we used 10 newly developed microsatellite loci to investigate the genetic structure of a parasitic bat fly (Basilia nana). Its host, the Bechstein’s bat (Myotis bechsteinii), has a social system and roosting behaviour that restrict opportunities for parasite transmission. We compared fly genetic structure to that of the host and another parasite, the wing-mite, Spinturnix bechsteini. We found little spatial or temporal genetic structure in B. nana, suggesting a large, stable popula- tion with frequent genetic exchange between fly populations from different bat colo- nies. This contrasts sharply with the genetic structure of the wing-mite, which is highly substructured between the same bat colonies as well as temporally unstable. Our results suggest that although host and parasite life history interact to yield similar transmission patterns in both parasite species, the level of gene flow and eventual spa- tiotemporal genetic stability is differentially affected. This can be explained by the dif- ferences in generation time and winter survival between the flies and wing-mites. Our study thus exemplifies that the population genetic structure of parasites on a single host can vary strongly as a result of how their individual life history characteristics interact with host behaviour and life history traits.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
DISEASE, DISPERSAL, NYCTERIBIIDAE, SPECIFICITY, IXODES-URIAE, SEABIRD HOST, MYOTIS-BECHSTEINII, CLOSED SOCIETIES, SOCIAL SYSTEM, BECHSTEINS BATS, social system, Myotis bechsteinii, life history, host-parasite interactions, population genetics, empirical, Basilia nana
journal title
MOLECULAR ECOLOGY
Mol. Ecol.
volume
24
issue
10
pages
2324 - 2335
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000353961500004
JCR category
ECOLOGY
JCR impact factor
5.947 (2015)
JCR rank
11/149 (2015)
JCR quartile
1 (2015)
ISSN
0962-1083
DOI
10.1111/mec.13171
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
7053554
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-7053554
date created
2016-01-26 11:33:59
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:39:14
@article{7053554,
  abstract     = {Host--parasite interactions are ubiquitous in nature. However, how parasite population genetic structure is shaped by the interaction between host and parasite life history remains understudied. Studies comparing multiple parasites infecting a single host can be used to investigate how different parasite life history traits interplay with host behaviour and life history. In this study, we used 10 newly developed microsatellite loci to investigate the genetic structure of a parasitic bat fly (Basilia nana). Its host, the Bechstein{\textquoteright}s bat (Myotis bechsteinii), has a social system and roosting behaviour that restrict opportunities for parasite transmission. We compared fly genetic structure to that of the host and another parasite, the wing-mite, Spinturnix bechsteini. We found little spatial or temporal genetic structure in B. nana, suggesting a large, stable popula- tion with frequent genetic exchange between fly populations from different bat colo- nies. This contrasts sharply with the genetic structure of the wing-mite, which is highly substructured between the same bat colonies as well as temporally unstable. Our results suggest that although host and parasite life history interact to yield similar transmission patterns in both parasite species, the level of gene flow and eventual spa- tiotemporal genetic stability is differentially affected. This can be explained by the dif- ferences in generation time and winter survival between the flies and wing-mites. Our study thus exemplifies that the population genetic structure of parasites on a single host can vary strongly as a result of how their individual life history characteristics interact with host behaviour and life history traits.},
  author       = {Van Schaik, Jaap and Dekeukeleire, Daan and Kerth, Gerald},
  issn         = {0962-1083},
  journal      = {MOLECULAR ECOLOGY},
  keyword      = {DISEASE,DISPERSAL,NYCTERIBIIDAE,SPECIFICITY,IXODES-URIAE,SEABIRD HOST,MYOTIS-BECHSTEINII,CLOSED SOCIETIES,SOCIAL SYSTEM,BECHSTEINS BATS,social system,Myotis bechsteinii,life history,host-parasite interactions,population genetics,empirical,Basilia nana},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {2324--2335},
  title        = {Host and parasite life history interplay to yield divergent population genetic structures in two ectoparasites living on the same bat species},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.13171},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2015},
}

Chicago
Van Schaik, Jaap, Daan Dekeukeleire, and Gerald Kerth. 2015. “Host and Parasite Life History Interplay to Yield Divergent Population Genetic Structures in Two Ectoparasites Living on the Same Bat Species.” Molecular Ecology 24 (10): 2324–2335.
APA
Van Schaik, J., Dekeukeleire, D., & Kerth, G. (2015). Host and parasite life history interplay to yield divergent population genetic structures in two ectoparasites living on the same bat species. MOLECULAR ECOLOGY, 24(10), 2324–2335.
Vancouver
1.
Van Schaik J, Dekeukeleire D, Kerth G. Host and parasite life history interplay to yield divergent population genetic structures in two ectoparasites living on the same bat species. MOLECULAR ECOLOGY. 2015;24(10):2324–35.
MLA
Van Schaik, Jaap, Daan Dekeukeleire, and Gerald Kerth. “Host and Parasite Life History Interplay to Yield Divergent Population Genetic Structures in Two Ectoparasites Living on the Same Bat Species.” MOLECULAR ECOLOGY 24.10 (2015): 2324–2335. Print.