Advanced search
Add to list

Continuous light as a way to increase greenhouse tomato production: expected challenges

(2012) Acta Horticulturae. 956. p.51-57
Author
Organization
Abstract
Tomato plants need six hours of darkness per day for optimal growth; therefore, photosynthesis does not take place for 25% of the day. If tomatoes could be grown under continuous light, a substantial increase in production is expected. In practice, however, continuous light-grown tomato plants develop a potentially lethal mottled chlorosis. Such continuous-light-induced injury is only poorly understood so far. Recently, we proposed a number of hypotheses that aim to explain the continuous-light-induced injury, and rediscovered that wild-tomato species were reported as continuous-light-tolerant. Here, we (i) present a simulation study which shows that if an ideal continuous-light-tolerant tomato genotype is used and no crop adaptations to continuous light are assumed, greenhouse tomato production could be 26% higher when using supplementary lighting for 24 h day(-1) in comparison with using supplementary lighting only for 18 h day(-1) during day time, and (ii) discuss expected changes in greenhouse energy budgets and alterations in crop physiological responses that might arise from cultivating tomatoes under continuous light.
Keywords
PHOTOPERIOD, INJURY, TEMPERATURE, PLANTS, GROWTH, supplementary light, greenhouse, chlorosis, continuous light, Solanum lycopersicum, QUALITY, PEPPER, POTATO

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Velez Ramirez, Aaron et al. “Continuous Light as a Way to Increase Greenhouse Tomato Production: Expected Challenges.” Acta Horticulturae. Ed. S Hemming & E Heuvelink. Vol. 956. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS), 2012. 51–57. Print.
APA
Velez Ramirez, A., Heuvelink, E., van Ieperen, W., Vreugdenhil, D., & Millenaar, F. (2012). Continuous light as a way to increase greenhouse tomato production: expected challenges. In S. Hemming & E. Heuvelink (Eds.), Acta Horticulturae (Vol. 956, pp. 51–57). Presented at the 7th International symposium on Light in Horticultural Systems, Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS).
Chicago author-date
Velez Ramirez, Aaron, E Heuvelink, Wim van Ieperen, Dick Vreugdenhil, and FF Millenaar. 2012. “Continuous Light as a Way to Increase Greenhouse Tomato Production: Expected Challenges.” In Acta Horticulturae, ed. S Hemming and E Heuvelink, 956:51–57. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS).
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Velez Ramirez, Aaron, E Heuvelink, Wim van Ieperen, Dick Vreugdenhil, and FF Millenaar. 2012. “Continuous Light as a Way to Increase Greenhouse Tomato Production: Expected Challenges.” In Acta Horticulturae, ed. S Hemming and E Heuvelink, 956:51–57. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS).
Vancouver
1.
Velez Ramirez A, Heuvelink E, van Ieperen W, Vreugdenhil D, Millenaar F. Continuous light as a way to increase greenhouse tomato production: expected challenges. In: Hemming S, Heuvelink E, editors. Acta Horticulturae. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS); 2012. p. 51–7.
IEEE
[1]
A. Velez Ramirez, E. Heuvelink, W. van Ieperen, D. Vreugdenhil, and F. Millenaar, “Continuous light as a way to increase greenhouse tomato production: expected challenges,” in Acta Horticulturae, Wageningen, The Netherlands, 2012, vol. 956, pp. 51–57.
@inproceedings{7051886,
  abstract     = {Tomato plants need six hours of darkness per day for optimal growth; therefore, photosynthesis does not take place for 25% of the day. If tomatoes could be grown under continuous light, a substantial increase in production is expected. In practice, however, continuous light-grown tomato plants develop a potentially lethal mottled chlorosis. Such continuous-light-induced injury is only poorly understood so far. Recently, we proposed a number of hypotheses that aim to explain the continuous-light-induced injury, and rediscovered that wild-tomato species were reported as continuous-light-tolerant. Here, we (i) present a simulation study which shows that if an ideal continuous-light-tolerant tomato genotype is used and no crop adaptations to continuous light are assumed, greenhouse tomato production could be 26% higher when using supplementary lighting for 24 h day(-1) in comparison with using supplementary lighting only for 18 h day(-1) during day time, and (ii) discuss expected changes in greenhouse energy budgets and alterations in crop physiological responses that might arise from cultivating tomatoes under continuous light.},
  author       = {Velez Ramirez, Aaron and Heuvelink, E and van Ieperen, Wim and Vreugdenhil, Dick and Millenaar, FF},
  booktitle    = {Acta Horticulturae},
  editor       = {Hemming, S and Heuvelink, E},
  isbn         = {9789066055452},
  issn         = {0567-7572},
  keywords     = {PHOTOPERIOD,INJURY,TEMPERATURE,PLANTS,GROWTH,supplementary light,greenhouse,chlorosis,continuous light,Solanum lycopersicum,QUALITY,PEPPER,POTATO},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Wageningen, The Netherlands},
  pages        = {51--57},
  publisher    = {International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS)},
  title        = {Continuous light as a way to increase greenhouse tomato production: expected challenges},
  volume       = {956},
  year         = {2012},
}

Web of Science
Times cited: